About Lumination Network

Who We Are

Lumination Network is Lipscomb University’s official student news service. We are a group made up of students from all majors who have a desire to submit various forms of media to be shared with the Lipscomb community. Lumination Network publishes news in several formats – articles, photo galleries, TV and Radio.

Get Involved

Lumination Network accepts writers, photographers, videographers, and ad salesmen of all majors. Interested in being on the staff? Simply show up to one of our Monday news meetings that take place at 11 a.m. in Ezell 155 and we’ll get you involved. Have a story idea or a question? Email the editor at editor@luminationnetwork.com. We would love to hear from you!

Staff

Mckenzi Harris

Mckenzi Harris

Editor-in-Chief

Kathryn Farris

Kathryn Farris

Managing Editor

Erika Plunkett

Managing Editor

Grant Ledgister

Sports Editor

Spencer Boehme

Spencer Boehme

Contributing Writer

Cavin Jacobson

Radio Director/reporter

Rachel Pavelich

Fashion Columnist

Tyler Harvey

Tyler Harvey

Staff writer

Ben Davis

Ben Davis

Photographer

Jimmy McCollum

Jimmy McCollum

Faculty Advisor

Tim Ghianni

Tim Ghianni

Faculty Adviser

Recent News

Killings of Floyd, two other black citizens ‘inexcusable’ says Lipscomb president

The killings of three black Americans — including the recent slaying of George Floyd, killed by a white Minneapolis police officer who kept his knee on his neck for almost nine minutes, until he was dead — are “tragic and inexcusable,” said Lipscomb President Randy Lowry. Lowry addressed the Floyd case — the officer has been charged with murder and more charges are expected against the other three officers on the scene —  and the other two deadly racist incidents in an email to the Lipscomb community. The killing of Floyd has led to demonstrations and rioting across the nation, including in Nashville, where a peaceful rally on Saturday was overshadowed by mob violence and arson of the Metro Courthouse and looting on Lower Broadway.  Downtown businesses continue on alert in case other incidents flare-up. “I write to you this Monday evening with a sense of deep sadness as we respond to the tragic and inexcusable deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor,” Lowry said. “It follows recent similar instances when the lives of black Americans have been wrongfully taken revealing continuing injustice and inequality in our nation. The Lipscomb community stands clearly on the side of respect and love. We are completely intolerant of racial abuse and injustices for all. “The Lipscomb community stands clearly on the side of respect and love,” he said. “We are completely intolerant of racial abuse and injustices for all.” The death of Floyd came on the heels of two highly publicized killings of black people by authority figures. Taylor, 26, an emergency room technician in Louisville, Kentucky, was shot at...

Lipscomb campus construction workers test positive with COVID-19

Several members of a construction team working on the Lipscomb campus have tested positive for the coronavirus, said President Randy Lowry in an email sent out to faculty members. “Yesterday one of the contractors on-site notified us that during routine daily health screenings required before an employee enters the construction site, several of their employees presented with a fever and were asked to leave the construction site to get COVID-19 tests and to self-quarantine,” Lowry wrote in the email. All of the individuals working at the site were tested, and the results have begun to come in. “While we are awaiting results from all of the tests, the contractor has notified us that several of the construction workers did test positive for the virus,” Lowry said. “When we learned of self-reported cases through one of our contractors, we engaged with the contractor to ensure access to testing was available to all members of the work crew,” said Kim Chaudoin, Lipscomb assistant vice president for public relations and communications. The site has been temporarily shut down for cleaning, and Lipscomb is taking precautions by holding virtual meetings with all of the contractors working on summer projects and reviewing their protocols. “The university has also implemented enhanced precautionary measures that require all subcontractors to assess their employees when they arrive on the work site, including a temperature check and health screening, wear masks and maintain appropriate physical distance among other measures,“ said Chaudoin. “While these results are concerning, we were not necessarily surprised to have a situation like this occur at some point, and we are prepared,” Chaudoin continued. “This quick...

Lady Bisons softball season cut short due to the coronavirus

By Megan Kuper, Shelby Talbert and Rose Schaddelee The Lady Bisons softball team looks for its 12th win of the 2020 season, approaching the fourth inning ahead by 10. Less than an inning later, Lipscomb defeats the Lady Tarheels due to the “mercy” run rule. The girls celebrate the big win and give hope to having the best season yet… until the unimaginable happened. The day after the Bisons big win, all winter and spring sports were brought to an end by the NCAA, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak that became a national emergency. “There’s no way that it’s over,” said Jenna Endris, a Bison whose junior season abruptly ended. “We did not see it coming at all,” she said, drawing a long, slow breath. “And it doesn’t seem real….” Hearing the season is over sprung many “Whys?” to Endris and the team: ”Why did we want to kill ourselves in the fall from conditioning and weights? And why did we go to practice for four hours every single day to not even compete for a championship?” Every day gets easier for the junior, she explained. The Lipscomb Bisons are reigning conference champions, and her positive attitude was fueled by cracking light-hearted jokes about going “back-to-pause-back (instead of “back-to-back”) conference champs” in her final season as a Lady Bison next season. Endris was not the only one feeling the impact of the season’s cancellation. “There were lots of tears and many expressed frustration, you know some having worked their whole softball careers and to have it end like this….,” said coach Kristin Ryman. “However we tried to remind...

Recent Galleries

Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb’s 129th graduation ceremony looked quite different than was expected when the school year began in August. Allen Arena, which typically hosts the celebratory event, sat empty on Saturday when the COVID-19 outbreak forced the university to host its first virtual graduation. From the charge to the alma mater, Lipscomb faculty and students combined live and pre-recorded clips to create an all-new commencement ceremony experience. President Randy Lowry opened the commencement ceremony with a video pre-recorded in Allen Arena. “Well this isn’t exactly like I imagined it,” Lowry said. “Here I am standing in Allen Arena, and if this was a normal moment: Students you would be here with me. You would be dressed in caps and gowns, and there would be five thousand people surrounding us as this amazing moment took place. We would march in, we’d hear the bagpipes; the faculty would follow a little bit later. You’d be on the stage walking across, I’d shake your hand, and you would have your college degree, your graduate degree. You would have completed this moment, and the celebration would be wonderful. “The reality is we all know that this is a different time. And we’re giving up something:We’re giving our Allen Arena moment in order to protect others,” said  Lowry. One of the many faculty members joining  Lowry in conducting the online ceremony, Dean of Community Life Prentice Ashford gave out the Stephen Marsh Award. “Steve was a 1977 Lipscomb graduate and the son of one of our former board members, Lee Marsh,” said Ashford. “He was a Christian example in every aspect of his life as a...

Lipscomb Full Moon Festival raises $6,700 for YES Mission

Lipscomb clubs, Delta Omega and Theta Psi host the Full Moon Festival each spring semester to raise money for a different mission. This year the clubs raised $6,700 for “The Mission of Youth Encouragement Services (YES).” The mission of yes is to “enrich the lives of children in Inner City Nashville, helping them to develop academically, physically, spiritually and socially.” The event functions as a philanthropy event but also united the student body through music. Throughout the evening, from 6 pm till 9 pm, students perform high-end karaoke with a live band and singing songs they have rehearsed. There is dancing, fun, and music all geared around a 50’s theme. The event is essentially a sock-hop playing current music mixed with old hits.   Riley Hoag captured a gallery of the event here. ...

Career-highs lead the Bisons past Kennesaw State in 73-85 win

The Lipscomb Bisons opened there 2020 home slate on Thursday night hosting ASUN opponent, Kennesaw State in their third conference game of the year. Despite a late comeback attempt by the Owls, the Bisons were able to pull away with a 73-85 victory behind senior guard Michael Buckland’s career-high 25 points and redshirt sophomore center Ahsan Asadullah’s career-high 28 points. “For about 34 minutes, I thought we played really, really well – some of our best play offensively. We went 13-26 from the 3-point line; the reason we did that is that we moved the ball,” said Lipscomb head coach Lennie Acuff. The two teams played competitively for much of the first half with both sides going on scoring runs, however, it was the Bisons who went into halftime with the lead 31-39, due to several key defensive stops. “I can come in as a senior and demand that defensive mentality from the younger guys. Because that’s where we are going to get conference wins,” Buckland said. “We are going to get scouted, offense is going to be stagnant at times, and so when it does get stagnant you have to be able to make stops on the defensive end.” Coming out of the half, Lipscomb got off to a hot start and began to take control of the game, leading by 20 points with 10 minutes remaining in the game. But, Kennesaw State refused to go home quietly.  “Our problem this year has been that we will have little lulls, and we have to learn to eliminate those lulls,” Buckland said. This lull cost the Bisons’ their large...