Frozen 2 delivers backstory but doesn’t stack up against the first Disney classic

Frozen 2 delivers backstory but doesn’t stack up against the first Disney classic

Disney has re-entered the world of ice, castles, and comedy with its long-awaited sequel, Frozen 2. In the past, Disney has admittingly had trouble with remakes and sequels. However, the animation giant seems to be regaining its quintessential magic with its newest release. The last two Disney sequel releases, Incredibles 2 and Toy Story 4, shattered box office records to become the top two highest-grossing animated features of all time and the Frozen sequel is already right on their heels. Currently, the film is taking the third grossing spot and outpacing these two films in presale tickets alone. Despite a nearly six-year gap since the first Frozen release, Frozen 2 seems to recognize that the fan base itself has grown while leaving room for younger kids to also enjoy the film. Both Elsa and Anna lose their signature braids and dresses in favor of sleek ponytails and pants, seemingly to mark the transition from innocent young girls to courageous adult women. Their quest: to find the origin of Elsa’s ice powers and reunite the kingdom of Arendelle with its mysterious enchanted forest counterpart. Over the course of their adventure, Princess Anna (voiced by Kristen Bell)  worries that her sister’s ice powers aren’t enough to protect her from the world beyond their safe home. Queen Elsa (voiced by Idina Menzel) battles the elements to learn that she’s valued and deserving of a greater purpose than just being queen. Olaf, the living snowman, is given youthful humor that peaks at naivety while Kristoff and Sven, the former iceman/reindeer duo, figure out how to pop the question to an unsuspecting Anna. And...
Global Learning student photos spotlighted in Worldview exhibit

Global Learning student photos spotlighted in Worldview exhibit

Worldview: A Photography Exhibit, was created to feature combined photo works by students who have experienced a Lipscomb Global Learning program. But it took a little extra time to get it opened. The exhibit opened Oct. 28 and will continue to be open for students to walk through and experience until Jan. 8. The original Oct. 21 opening was delayed due to shipping issues. The exhibit was rescheduled to open first thing in the morning Oct. 28, but was pushed back even then. “We are trying to get it up by the end of the day,” said Mia Jaye, Lipscomb’s program coordinator and gallery assistant. The pictures were finally hung and the exhibit was open that evening. The John C. Hutcheson Gallery, located in the east wing of the institution’s Beaman Library, is brand new to the campus. After over a week’s worth of delays the gallery is up and running and several Global Learning alumni have stopped in to see if their pictures were selected. One of those alums, Brianna Burch, said: “the pictures that were selected are really cool and I hope they do something like this again. I think it’s really cool to be able to see other students’ experiences.” Burch has been to the United Kingdom, Italy, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Vatican City. The visual arts program decided to create an exhibit where students could submit their own work from their experiences abroad. The photos have been curated by two School of Art and Design students Haley Herold and Grant Gasser. For more information, please contact Mia Jaye Thomas at miajaye.thomas@lipscomb.edu....
Kirk Franklin boycotts Dove Awards after police-brutality speech is edited

Kirk Franklin boycotts Dove Awards after police-brutality speech is edited

Gospel artist Kirk Franklin says he will boycot future Dove Awards, the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) and the Gospel Music Association (GMA), until “tangible plans are put in place to protect and champion diversity.” The GMA has responded by beginning a process to reconcile with Franklin and other stars who have announced support for him. The GMA Dove Awards, an annual show that recognizes achievement in the Christian music industry, took place on Lipscomb University’s campus for the seventh consecutive year on Oct. 16. Franklin’s boycott, that he announced early in November, is in response to the network removing comments during his Artist of the Year award acceptance speech. Franklin spoke of  the death of a 28-year-old black woman who died after a Fort Worth police officer shot through her window Oct. 12. “A young girl by the name of Atatiana Jefferson was shot and killed in her home by a policeman, and I am just asking that we send up prayers for her family and for his,” Franklin said. “And asking that we send up prayers for that 8-year-old little boy that saw that tragedy.” That moment, along with others, was edited out of the 50th Annual Dove Awards television broadcast. In response, Franklin took to social media and posted a video calling for a boycott of the show. He said the ultimate goal of the boycott is “reconciliation and accountability.” “It is important for those in charge to be informed,” he said. “Not only did they edit my speech, they edited the African-American experience.” Franklin said that this isn’t the first time the GMAs have chosen to...
Steve Martin, Edie Brickell’s ‘Bright Star’ mixes roots music with redemption

Steve Martin, Edie Brickell’s ‘Bright Star’ mixes roots music with redemption

When attending “Bright Star” at Collins Alumni Auditorium, “people should expect to laugh, but be prepared to cry a lot as well,” said Emma Harvey, a member of the ensemble cast. The innovative musical  by comedian actor and musician Steve Martin and by Edie Brickell, former leader of the New Bohemians and wife of rock lyricist Paul Simon, will run November 1, 2, 8, and 9 at 7:30 pm; November 3 and 10 at 2:30 pm in Collins Alumni Auditorium. “The play centers around the life of Alice Murphy, it’s set in the 1920s-1940s,” said Harvey. “It is a story of loss, love, and redemption.” The leads of the show are Hatty King and Easton Curtis. The musical is the first of its kind — it’s bluegrass centered and blends that rootsy music with traditional musical theater. The play actually sprung from a 2013 album by Martin — who also is an acclaimed banjo player — and Brickell, “Love Has Come For You.” Two songs from that album are part of the score, with the rest composed by the star tandem. Brickell is credited with the lyrics, while Martin wrote the book. This show is way more focused on the adult audience and gracefully tackles real-world issues. Students can attend the play for free by using the code StuTix1920 at checkout. Photos provided by CEA photographer, Sarah...
PREVIEW: Dove Awards set to return to Lipscomb stage for 50th annual show

PREVIEW: Dove Awards set to return to Lipscomb stage for 50th annual show

It’s that time of year again — a white tent has been placed outside Allen Arena, and weekly parking email warns of an expansive list of closed parking spots for Tuesday evening when Lipscomb will host the 50thannual Dove Awards. It’s Lipscomb’s seventh year hosting the GMA Dove Awards, and as usual, several genre heavyweights will be in attendance. This year’s guest list includes artists like Lauren Daigle, Amy Grant, Hillsong Worship and MercyMe. Performances are expected from the five new artist of the year nominees Riley Clemmons, Austin French, Kelontae Gavin, Josh Baldwin and Aaron Carter. The nominations for major category song of the year shine a light on writers and performers like Francesca Battistelli’s “The Breakup Song” and Lauren Daigle’s “You Say.” Daigle’s song “You Say,” co-written by Jason Ingram and Paul Mabury, recently broke the record for the longest No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot Christian Songs chart. Presenters will include comedian John Crist, Kathy Lee Gifford, for KING & COUNTRY and Lipscomb alum Pat Boone. Lumination will bring you full coverage of the big event, so check back Tuesday evening. Till then, check out last year’s coverage here.  Photo by Ben...
Lipscomb students “spin” themselves to a healthier community

Lipscomb students “spin” themselves to a healthier community

Before her class began at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Emily Patti spent a few minutes adjusting her seat pedals and fixing her microphone. She greeted students individually as they walked in the door and warmly welcomed new members. Then, she dimmed the lights, got on her bike, and blasted the stereo. This is Spin, the world of indoor cycling, which first found its way to Lipscomb University in 2009. Since then, group fitness has had a sharp increase in participation with Spin being the most attended class on campus. The concept of Spin is simple: a 45-minute fitness session where students ride stationary bikes at various levels of resistance while led by an instructor. This, combined with bass pumping music and a dark room, makes for an immersive yet entertaining workout. In recent years, spin classes have become extremely popular, with celebrities like Beyonce and former President Barack Obama loving the fast-paced and high-intensity workouts that make them break a sweat. But it’s more than just the challenging workout that keeps students coming back week after week. Some students rely on the class environment with an upbeat instructor to keep them involved in this fitness fad.  “I love the fun group vibe here and the music,” said Lipscomb student, Abigail Hardage. “Yes, it’s a challenging workout, but Emily motivates me to be the absolute best. I honestly don’t think I’d be able to do on my own what she pushes me to do each week.” Emily Patti is the instructor for the twice-weekly class, she began teaching after a soccer injury left her unable to exercise with the team. She...