PREVIEW: Dove Awards set to return to Lipscomb stage for 50th annual show

PREVIEW: Dove Awards set to return to Lipscomb stage for 50th annual show

It’s that time of year again — a white tent has been placed outside Allen Arena, and weekly parking email warns of an expansive list of closed parking spots for Tuesday evening when Lipscomb will host the 50thannual Dove Awards. It’s Lipscomb’s seventh year hosting the GMA Dove Awards, and as usual, several genre heavyweights will be in attendance. This year’s guest list includes artists like Lauren Daigle, Amy Grant, Hillsong Worship and MercyMe. Performances are expected from the five new artist of the year nominees Riley Clemmons, Austin French, Kelontae Gavin, Josh Baldwin and Aaron Carter. The nominations for major category song of the year shine a light on writers and performers like Francesca Battistelli’s “The Breakup Song” and Lauren Daigle’s “You Say.” Daigle’s song “You Say,” co-written by Jason Ingram and Paul Mabury, recently broke the record for the longest No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot Christian Songs chart. Presenters will include comedian John Crist, Kathy Lee Gifford, for KING & COUNTRY and Lipscomb alum Pat Boone. Lumination will bring you full coverage of the big event, so check back Tuesday evening. Till then, check out last year’s coverage here.  Photo by Ben...
Lipscomb students “spin” themselves to a healthier community

Lipscomb students “spin” themselves to a healthier community

Before her class began at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Emily Patti spent a few minutes adjusting her seat pedals and fixing her microphone. She greeted students individually as they walked in the door and warmly welcomed new members. Then, she dimmed the lights, got on her bike, and blasted the stereo. This is Spin, the world of indoor cycling, which first found its way to Lipscomb University in 2009. Since then, group fitness has had a sharp increase in participation with Spin being the most attended class on campus. The concept of Spin is simple: a 45-minute fitness session where students ride stationary bikes at various levels of resistance while led by an instructor. This, combined with bass pumping music and a dark room, makes for an immersive yet entertaining workout. In recent years, spin classes have become extremely popular, with celebrities like Beyonce and former President Barack Obama loving the fast-paced and high-intensity workouts that make them break a sweat. But it’s more than just the challenging workout that keeps students coming back week after week. Some students rely on the class environment with an upbeat instructor to keep them involved in this fitness fad.  “I love the fun group vibe here and the music,” said Lipscomb student, Abigail Hardage. “Yes, it’s a challenging workout, but Emily motivates me to be the absolute best. I honestly don’t think I’d be able to do on my own what she pushes me to do each week.” Emily Patti is the instructor for the twice-weekly class, she began teaching after a soccer injury left her unable to exercise with the team. She...
Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse offers ‘a bit of nostalgia and fun’

Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse offers ‘a bit of nostalgia and fun’

A bit of nostalgia for ‘older kids,’ the children’s play Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse plays through Saturday, Sept. 28, at Shamblin. Lipscomb’s School of Fine and Performing Arts is presenting the show, based on the children’s books by Kevin Henkes. The tale features a mouse named Lilly who loves everything about school. Pals Chester and Wilson say they are two peas in a pod, but Lilly soon comes to town and eventually becomes best friends with both of them. “It’s really good for ages 5-10,” said Emma Harvey, who plays Chester, when talking about the play. “Adults love it too, though,” she said. “There are some really specific parts of the show that are geared towards adults, and that children just won’t get. For college students, it’s really nostalgic because we grew up reading the books.” Tickets for can be purchased here for the remaining shows at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27, and at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 28, in Shamblin Theatre. Harvey encourages her college schoolmates to catch it before it’s gone. “You should definitely come see this show for a little bit of nostalgia and fun.” Gallery by Madison Sharpe. DSC9178 Aperture: 4Camera: ILCE-7RM3Iso: 1600 « ‹ 1 of 21 ›...
Lipscomb students sample Ken Burns’ sprawling ‘Country Music’ documentary

Lipscomb students sample Ken Burns’ sprawling ‘Country Music’ documentary

Sunday night Lipscomb School of Music hosted a free concert and viewing of part of Ken Burns newest massive documentary series on “Country Music.” The entire series consists of eight segments running at least two hours in length. Before students watched the documentary there was a concert featuring, Cindy Morgan, Scott Mulvahill, Johnson Roberts and Abby Siler. Cindy Morgan performed the longest set, but all of the singers sang an old hymn and the crowd sang along with them. After the concert was over the documentary started. “Country Music” details how country music began and its episodes explore the development of he genre to what it is now. Burns interviews country artists and music industry figures for the film series. Those interviewed include Carlene Carter, who carries the Carter Family name forward, Kris Kristofferson, who changed the literary style of country music, as well as megastars like Garth Brooks and Dolly Parton. Music and photos of such historic stars as The Carters, Mac Wiseman, Hank Williams, Cowboy Jack Clement are featured throughout the documentary. For example, episode six focuses on the wordplay offered up by Kristofferson and his contemporary from the folk-rock world Bob Dylan. The two men’s connections to Johnny Cash are explored in depth. The full documentary series is being shown on PBS stations nationwide (WNPT-Channel 8 in Nashville) and also is available On...
Kelli Anderson talks paper art and ‘ Lo-fi Magic’

Kelli Anderson talks paper art and ‘ Lo-fi Magic’

What can paper do? If you ask acclaimed artist, Kelli Anderson, she would say “the possibilities are endless.” On Monday, September 9th, Anderson visited Lipscomb University to talk about her work as a paper engineer.  During her career as an artist, she has worked with institutions such as the MoMa, NPR and The New Yorker. Paper as a medium has become a unique focal point in her work because she loves exploring the complexities of a very mundane object. Anderson spoke on how fascinating it is that something like a math equation can be so challenging when written on paper, but you can begin to understand the complexities of the once impossible problem by folding and changing the shape of the paper. Anderson has taken paper and molded and shaped it into a camera, a planetarium, an instrument, and a speaker. You can find these in her two interactive pop-up books titled, This Book is a Camera and This Book is a Planetarium. Throughout her notable career, she has taken art to a whole new dimension. Her love for paper, graphic design, and animation have turned her into a household name among artists everywhere. Anderson’s mantra throughout her creative career has been, “why are lo-fi things so appealing to us in a world full of modern technology?” Why is there a love for paper and pop-up books in a seemingly, only digital age? Anderson’s answer is simple, “There is this beautiful relationship between working with one’s hands and something that is only 2-D or digital plane.”   Since kindergarten, we are taught to work with our hands and solve problems hands-on, but...
New Exhibit ‘Animators After Dark’ features local legends art work

New Exhibit ‘Animators After Dark’ features local legends art work

A new exhibit in Lipscomb’s Hutchenson gallery was announced this past week to kick off the fall season. The new exhibit titled, “Animators After Dark” features a more dramatic side of the industry experts with works from Tom Bancroft, Tim Hodge, John Pomeroy, and Scott Sava.  These local legends have created some of your favorite films and shows including Veggie Tales, The Lion King, Tom & Jerry, and more. But when the animating ends, these artists go home “after dark” to create their own work. This allows them to express themselves in other mediums without the pressure of deadlines or storyboarding. “This exhibition showcases what Bancroft, Hodge, Pomeroy, and Sava create in their free moments of artistic exploration. With some of the pieces, you will be able to see a clear parallel to the work that these artists create in their “day job”. For example, Bancroft’s pieces still feature his famous Disney characters and Sava’s pieces feature vibrant illustrations of pop culture characters. But, some of the pieces are a stark contrast to the artists’ animation work,” said Mia Jaye Thomas, program coordinator for the Hutcheson Art Gallery. While serving as adjunct professors in the animation department, the four professionals featured in the gallery have helped shape the next generation of students at Lipscomb. Through this gallery, the animators hope to showcase the side projects that they work on when they want to explore their own stories. Ultimately, the illustrations, paintings, and sketches are also a chance to inspire their students to create. “We hope that students and faculty come to see this exhibition (and all of our exhibitions)...