REVIEW: Little Women reminds us of the timelessness of Alcott’s novel

REVIEW: Little Women reminds us of the timelessness of Alcott’s novel

Based on the novel of the same name, Little Women explores the complexities of life through the four March sisters. Director Greta Gerwig artfully recreates Louisa May Alcott’s classic and weaves together a beautiful and visually powerful film. Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, and Eliza Scanlen headline as Jo, Meg, Amy, and Beth March alongside Timothee Chalamet as Laurie, Meryl Streep as Aunt March, and Laura Dern as Mother “Marmie” March. The chemistry between these actresses and their faithful representations of their characters endear viewers to this family with all of its triumphs and struggles. Jo, an aspiring writer, struggles with discovering her voice, debating between the popular sensationalized drama and the real stories that move and drive our lives. Through love, sadness, separation, disagreements, and the trials of growing up, she can find clarity and discover what she truly wants in life.  Alcott’s and Gerwig’s intrinsic understanding of human nature is evident in this story and provides the timeless appeal of this piece. The characters are not afraid to expose their weaknesses alongside their accomplishments, and the family dynamics of the March family take viewers back to their childhoods. The relationships forged among characters welcome viewers into the family, evoking laughter, tears, and sympathetic sighs. The powerful seamlessness of the movie is created through the frame in which the story is told. Each scene comes full circle as it is told alongside flashbacks, giving the full story of the Marches. The juxtaposition of these scenes years apart sheds clarity on the growth of the family, collectively and individually. In addition, the very real and very relatable challenges...
Lighting of the Green sparks the beginning of Lipscomb’s holiday season

Lighting of the Green sparks the beginning of Lipscomb’s holiday season

Hot chocolate, Christmas cookies, Santa and Amy Grant braved the chilly temperatures all in the name of the holiday spirit for Tuesday night’s 15th annual Lighting of the Green. The festive event marked the start of Christmas for the Lipscomb community and gave students the opportunity to celebrate the past semester before the hectic atmosphere of finals week. Per tradition, Lipscomb welcomed back artist Amy Grant to host the musical celebration. During her set, Grant brought out several “friends” and musical guests to perform songs such as “Silver Bells,” “Grown-up Christmas List” and the local staple “Tennessee Christmas.” Speaking on her song “Tennessee Christmas,” Grant told the crowd “nobody really gets it quite like the Nashville crowd.” Choirs from the University as well as the Academy had a special role in the celebration, for they spent the night singing alongside Grant on stage. Other guests of the night included Marc Martel and Anthem Lights, the Christian based artists joined Grant on stage to sing the holiday songs that have shaped their “Like probaly many of you, I grew up with the music of Miss Amy Grant in the house..which is really mind-blowing for me.” Martel told the audience. Throughout the night, attendees from the Lipscomb community and the surrounding neighborhoods gathered while admiring Christmas lights and enjoying activities such as the “Merry Marketplace.” The Marketplace took place in McQuiddy Gym and featured free photos with Santa and several Holiday vendors. A major highlight of the night is the recognition of a College of the Entertainment and the Arts student with the Amy Grant Scholarship. This year’s recipient is Abby...
Frozen 2 delivers backstory but doesn’t stack up against the first Disney classic

Frozen 2 delivers backstory but doesn’t stack up against the first Disney classic

Disney has re-entered the world of ice, castles, and comedy with its long-awaited sequel, Frozen 2. In the past, Disney has admittingly had trouble with remakes and sequels. However, the animation giant seems to be regaining its quintessential magic with its newest release. The last two Disney sequel releases, Incredibles 2 and Toy Story 4, shattered box office records to become the top two highest-grossing animated features of all time and the Frozen sequel is already right on their heels. Currently, the film is taking the third grossing spot and outpacing these two films in presale tickets alone. Despite a nearly six-year gap since the first Frozen release, Frozen 2 seems to recognize that the fan base itself has grown while leaving room for younger kids to also enjoy the film. Both Elsa and Anna lose their signature braids and dresses in favor of sleek ponytails and pants, seemingly to mark the transition from innocent young girls to courageous adult women. Their quest: to find the origin of Elsa’s ice powers and reunite the kingdom of Arendelle with its mysterious enchanted forest counterpart. Over the course of their adventure, Princess Anna (voiced by Kristen Bell)  worries that her sister’s ice powers aren’t enough to protect her from the world beyond their safe home. Queen Elsa (voiced by Idina Menzel) battles the elements to learn that she’s valued and deserving of a greater purpose than just being queen. Olaf, the living snowman, is given youthful humor that peaks at naivety while Kristoff and Sven, the former iceman/reindeer duo, figure out how to pop the question to an unsuspecting Anna. And...
Global Learning student photos spotlighted in Worldview exhibit

Global Learning student photos spotlighted in Worldview exhibit

Worldview: A Photography Exhibit, was created to feature combined photo works by students who have experienced a Lipscomb Global Learning program. But it took a little extra time to get it opened. The exhibit opened Oct. 28 and will continue to be open for students to walk through and experience until Jan. 8. The original Oct. 21 opening was delayed due to shipping issues. The exhibit was rescheduled to open first thing in the morning Oct. 28, but was pushed back even then. “We are trying to get it up by the end of the day,” said Mia Jaye, Lipscomb’s program coordinator and gallery assistant. The pictures were finally hung and the exhibit was open that evening. The John C. Hutcheson Gallery, located in the east wing of the institution’s Beaman Library, is brand new to the campus. After over a week’s worth of delays the gallery is up and running and several Global Learning alumni have stopped in to see if their pictures were selected. One of those alums, Brianna Burch, said: “the pictures that were selected are really cool and I hope they do something like this again. I think it’s really cool to be able to see other students’ experiences.” Burch has been to the United Kingdom, Italy, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, and Vatican City. The visual arts program decided to create an exhibit where students could submit their own work from their experiences abroad. The photos have been curated by two School of Art and Design students Haley Herold and Grant Gasser. For more information, please contact Mia Jaye Thomas at miajaye.thomas@lipscomb.edu....
Kirk Franklin boycotts Dove Awards after police-brutality speech is edited

Kirk Franklin boycotts Dove Awards after police-brutality speech is edited

Gospel artist Kirk Franklin says he will boycot future Dove Awards, the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) and the Gospel Music Association (GMA), until “tangible plans are put in place to protect and champion diversity.” The GMA has responded by beginning a process to reconcile with Franklin and other stars who have announced support for him. The GMA Dove Awards, an annual show that recognizes achievement in the Christian music industry, took place on Lipscomb University’s campus for the seventh consecutive year on Oct. 16. Franklin’s boycott, that he announced early in November, is in response to the network removing comments during his Artist of the Year award acceptance speech. Franklin spoke of  the death of a 28-year-old black woman who died after a Fort Worth police officer shot through her window Oct. 12. “A young girl by the name of Atatiana Jefferson was shot and killed in her home by a policeman, and I am just asking that we send up prayers for her family and for his,” Franklin said. “And asking that we send up prayers for that 8-year-old little boy that saw that tragedy.” That moment, along with others, was edited out of the 50th Annual Dove Awards television broadcast. In response, Franklin took to social media and posted a video calling for a boycott of the show. He said the ultimate goal of the boycott is “reconciliation and accountability.” “It is important for those in charge to be informed,” he said. “Not only did they edit my speech, they edited the African-American experience.” Franklin said that this isn’t the first time the GMAs have chosen to...
Steve Martin, Edie Brickell’s ‘Bright Star’ mixes roots music with redemption

Steve Martin, Edie Brickell’s ‘Bright Star’ mixes roots music with redemption

When attending “Bright Star” at Collins Alumni Auditorium, “people should expect to laugh, but be prepared to cry a lot as well,” said Emma Harvey, a member of the ensemble cast. The innovative musical  by comedian actor and musician Steve Martin and by Edie Brickell, former leader of the New Bohemians and wife of rock lyricist Paul Simon, will run November 1, 2, 8, and 9 at 7:30 pm; November 3 and 10 at 2:30 pm in Collins Alumni Auditorium. “The play centers around the life of Alice Murphy, it’s set in the 1920s-1940s,” said Harvey. “It is a story of loss, love, and redemption.” The leads of the show are Hatty King and Easton Curtis. The musical is the first of its kind — it’s bluegrass centered and blends that rootsy music with traditional musical theater. The play actually sprung from a 2013 album by Martin — who also is an acclaimed banjo player — and Brickell, “Love Has Come For You.” Two songs from that album are part of the score, with the rest composed by the star tandem. Brickell is credited with the lyrics, while Martin wrote the book. This show is way more focused on the adult audience and gracefully tackles real-world issues. Students can attend the play for free by using the code StuTix1920 at checkout. Photos provided by CEA photographer, Sarah...