OPINION: Summer semester is the best semester

OPINION: Summer semester is the best semester

Ah, summer school — A place where (according to the movies) delinquent students who flunk a class during the school year have to spend their summer instead of enjoying vacations. Summer school is a punishment for many a high-schooler, a tool to keep students motivated to do their work or be forced to redo it during their precious break. Summer school in college is rarely talked about in the movies, however: Is summer school still for the unmotivated college students? Is it a punishment for not taking school seriously? It is neither of those. In fact, in my experience, it is the exact opposite. Students who take summer classes during Lipscomb’s summer semester are the most motivated. They want to graduate on time, or graduate early, or in my case graduate with extra degrees that may or may not help with graduate school admissions. Other than the winter semester (known as Wintermester at Lipscomb) Summer Semester is the shortest of the school semesters. In fact, it is broken up into three different semesters that are each five weeks long: Maymester, Junemester, and Julymester (catchy names, I know). Some classes last 10 weeks, throughout two of the semesters. These are called “full-term” summer semester classes, but they are just June and July. This means you can get three credit hours knocked out in five weeks or 10-weeks! Sure, the classes are fast-paced and you typically have to be there every day or for four hours on one day, but most professors I’ve had are efficient teachers and don’t ever hold you the entire length of the class. I’ve also learned...
Letter from the (old) editor: farewell, Lumination

Letter from the (old) editor: farewell, Lumination

It’s actually here. I’m officially an alumna from Lipscomb as of Saturday, which means I’ve passed the Lumination “Editor” mantle on to a new leader. I started serving as editor the summer after my freshman year. When I got started, I remember truly not knowing what to expect, but I also remember truly being excited about what the future held. Now, Lumination Network will be getting a completely new editorial staff since Russell Vannozzi, one of our managing editors, and I have both graduated. Our second managing editor, Spencer Boehme, is a rising junior, but he will be turning to primarily focus on Lumination Radio to serve as the radio sports director. Rising junior Mckenzi Harris will be the new Editor-in-Chief, rising sophomore Kathryn Farris will be one of the managing editors and rising sophomore Erika Plunkett will also serve as a managing editor. As we passed on Lumination to this new leadership team filled with three strong women, I have written this column to offer a few words of advice and to express my gratitude for being able to serve you by bringing the news to the Lipscomb campus. Firstly, pay attention to your student news. Freedom of the press is important, no matter what scale or “level” that press is, whether it’s student news or the New York Times. As a journalism geek, I have a mug with a quote on it by Thomas Jefferson that has resonated with me as I pursue a career in journalism: “Our liberty depends on freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost.” In today’s political climate,...
DC’s latest film ‘Shazam’ captures essence of youth

DC’s latest film ‘Shazam’ captures essence of youth

Childhood is one of the most memorable times in our life — a time where dreams of becoming princesses, astronauts and cowboys are never questioned — when being a superhero was as easy as climbing up the top of the stairs with a blanket tied to your neck, jumping as far as you can, until being defeated by the ultimate super villain. Gravity. Shazam takes those memories, along with action, humor and childhood antics and then wraps it up all in one for a great time for everyone. Zachary Levi (Shazam) was a dark horse for the role of the Great Wizard once the movie was announced in 2017, but his performance captures the warmness and wit that makes Shazam such a great character in all of comic books. Billy Batson (Asher Angel) has been in the foster care system since he was a young child, and he’s only had one person to look out for — himself. That changes when a family takes in the rebellious teen. While reluctantly adjusting to life with a family, he encounters the Great Wizard, Shazam, who champions Batson and bestows his powers to him when Batson says one word, SHAZAM! The highlight of the film is the accuracy of how it would be should a 14-year-old boy actually be granted super powers. The child in everyone relates to Billy with his decisions while being the Great Champion. Again, Levi does an amazing job of harnessing the joy and newness of youth. Angel also gives a wonderful performance as the rebellious teenager creating a sense of understanding from the audience. Originality of Shazam’s...
LU’s GQ: How to wear a suit and look good

LU’s GQ: How to wear a suit and look good

There comes a time in every man’s life when he has to wear a suit. However, wearing a suit is a far more complex task than many perceive it to be. The majority of men have no idea what they’re doing as they simply go out and purchase a suit with no thought, especially college students. So here are five simple rules to make wearing a suit a memorable experience, whatever the occasion — because there is nothing wrong with having a little edge. The suit: If you speak to a tailor or anyone in the fashion industry, and ask him or her the most important aspect when it comes to wearing a suit, tailors will most definitely say the fit, 100% of the time. It doesn’t matter if your suit is made from the finest Italian fabric or diamonds, if it doesn’t compliment your body, it can make you look sloppy and unprofessional. You can easily make a $100 suit look like a $1,000 suit just by fine-tuning all the little details of a suit in order to fit your body nicely. Belt and shoes: When wearing a suit, combine it with a nice pair of dress shoes and a belt. Shoes, and belts come in different colors, shapes and sizes. The general rule for shoes is that they must match the belt in color. The pocket square: A pocket square adds a new level of style and polish but make sure it does not match your tie in either pattern or material. It should simply complement your shirt, and tie. Be creative with the pocket square, from...
GLUTEN-FREE FRIDAY: Juice Bar gives health-boost for spring break

GLUTEN-FREE FRIDAY: Juice Bar gives health-boost for spring break

With Nashville’s weather being as unpredictable as *insert typical Southern phrase here*, Berry Hill’s Juice Bar is a welcome sanctuary of healthy choices for all eaters. Juice Bar, located only two miles from campus, offers more than just refreshing, vitamin-filled juices. With various food choices, like spring rolls and sandwiches, smoothies/smoothie bowls, and even shots (don’t worry–they’re non-alcoholic), Juice Bar is a local hero for everyone who wants to be healthy and/or stay that way. One of my personal favorite menu choices at Juice Bar is the dragonfruit smoothie bowl. First off, the color of the smoothie bowl is a stunning deep pink, which I think only enhances the whole eating experience. The bowl tastes bright and spunky, with its sweet mango complimented by the zingy dragonfruit, all topped off with honey, bananas and strawberries. If you’re gluten-free, make sure to ask for no granola—maybe they’ll be nice and sub cacao nibs or another gluten-free treat for you instead. Another favorite for me is the Pad Thai Noodle Bowl. The noodles are made from sweet potatoes, which provide a light yet sturdy texture that works well as noodles. The sauce is sweet and perfectly seasoned, with seeds and cashews on top, making it a protein-rich, gluten-free meal.  If you are feeling under the weather, but you’re still not quite brave enough to try one of Juice Bar’s Power Shots, like the Ginger & Cayenne shot, go for the Sweet Greens juice. Sweet Greens contains the perfect combination of fruits and vegetables, including lemon, kale, spinach, cucumber and parsley. Yes, parsley. I’m not about the parsley-eating life, but if you...
REVIEW: Captain Marvel features sturdy storyline and cast, overdone themes

REVIEW: Captain Marvel features sturdy storyline and cast, overdone themes

Transitions can be hard — moving out of your parents’ house and actually paying bills, or when your university changes from Pepsi to Coke. #neverforget With Marvel’s highly anticipated “Avengers: Endgame” premiering late next month, “Captain Marvel” sneaks in as the last superhero introduced in Phase Three, Marvel’s timeline of character storylines, thus transitioning into the next chapter of the Marvel Universe. The movie isn’t anything too spectacular; it doesn’t help that it’s placed in the middle of “Infinity War” and “Endgame,” acting as an appetizer before we devour the main course. Captain Marvel (Brie Larson) finds herself right in the middle of the war between the warmongering Kree and the shapeshifting Skrulls. With her mind swiped of her memories, Carol Danvers must hone her newly-found radioactive powers and regain who she is. The storyline is solid, but the overall ideas and themes are overdone. You enter into “Total Recall“ territory with the lost memory premise and then combine that with an intergalactic war of “Star Wars” proportions and sprinkle in “Star Trek”-like cosmetics. Larson’s supporting cast is a bright spot of the film, which is led by Jude Law (Sherlock Holmes) and Ben Mendelsohn (Rogue One), and you can’t have a Marvel movie without the Kangol-wearing king of box office blockbusters, Samuel L. Jackson. It makes sense that casting for this film would be so strong, considering how importantly the storytelling in this film will lead into more to come. In the comics, Captain Marvel becomes the new leader of the Avengers with Iron Man passing the torch to her. It seems to be the way the movies...