Opinion: summer classes are better than fall and spring classes

Opinion: summer classes are better than fall and spring classes

Ah, summer school. The movies portray it as some kind of dungeon that sucks up your summer while all your friends who did good in school enjoy the pool. Summer school does have a negative connotation to it. Some people view summer school as a place where degenerates go after partying too much and flunking their fall and spring classes. When college students hear that the classes are typically three weeks to eight weeks long yet still jam a whole semester into them, they think only sadists would do that to themselves. Summer school, however, is not only easier than traditional school, it’s faster, and it keeps you in the rhythm of school. At Lipscomb, there are four summer semesters: Maymester, Junemester and Julymester, and also a full summer semester that stretches throughout June and July. This summer, I took two classes in Maymester that lasted only three weeks, four classes in the full summer semester that only took eight weeks and another final class in Julymester that went along with the final three weeks of my full summer classes. I took 19 credit hours in the span of 12 weeks, as opposed to a 16-week traditional semester. I still get a three-week break before classes start up again in the Fall, which is the same amount of time as Christmas break, and all the time away I need. The pacing of summer classes is fantastic. Too many times in too many classes I have spent what feels like an eternity on one chapter or one concept that I got down in the first few days. Meeting twice a...
‘Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again!’ adds new twist to the original musical

‘Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again!’ adds new twist to the original musical

Sequel films rarely ever live up to expectations, but Mamma Mia fanatics will be just as enthralled with Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again! as they were with the original, despite the ten-year gap between films. Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again! takes fans back to the Greek Islands and tells the story of young Donna (Lily James)  exploring the world and finding her path alongside the modern day progression of Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) as she re-opens her mother’s hotel. Donna’s story is unpacked beyond the diary featured in the first film, and fans get to see the events of the fateful summer she meets Harry, Bill and Sam, and the journey that led to her opening the hotel and raising Sophie. While diving into the adventures of 20-something Donna, the modern-day grand opening of the newly renovated hotel brings old friends and Sophie’s three fathers back together. The film explores the past that led to the original Mamma Mia! story and wraps up Sophie’s journey and the loose ends left in the first film, including her relationship with Sky. The film features a healthy mix of the old and new, showcasing the original 2008 cast plus several new talented members. Lily James holds her own as the young Donna, originally played by Meryl Streep, and she brings her own style to the beloved character. Fans will not be disappointed in the music as a few beloved ABBA songs from the first film re-appear along with a whole new soundtrack of songs from the famous band. Though some characters from the first film are not featured as much as...
Marvel scores big again with ‘Ant Man and the Wasp’

Marvel scores big again with ‘Ant Man and the Wasp’

Ant-Man and the Wasp is the first Marvel movie after Avengers: Infinity War left theater-goers speechless. Ant-Man and the Wasp is its own standalone movie that mingles very little with the other Marvel films, not confronting the cliffhangers in Infinity War. If you haven’t seen Infinity War yet, you don’t need to in order to understand and enjoy this film. Ant Man and the Wasp is possibly even the best film Marvel could have put out right after Infinity War as it allowed Marvel fans to stop stressing over the cliffhanger at the end of Infinity War and focus on another great superhero adventure that is going on at the same time. Ant-Man and the Wasp follows Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) way over on the other side of the United States in sunny San Fransisco, a place that doesn’t have much of a superhero presence (as opposed to New York City, where most of Marvel’s heroes live). Scott has been on house arrest now for two years following the events of Captain America: Civil War, and of course, he only has one week left until he is a free, non-superhero man. During his last week on house arrest, he has a dream about Hank Pym’s (Michael Douglas) wife, Janet Van Dyne (Michelle Pfeiffer) who has been trapped in the Quantum Realm since before the events of the first film. Scott then gets roped into another adventure with Hank and Hope Pym (Evangeline Lilly) to rescue Janet from the Quantum Realm. This time, Hope dons the suit of the Wasp, who can fly, has laser guns and is much more...
‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor’ offers look into Mister Rogers’ genuine care for children

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor’ offers look into Mister Rogers’ genuine care for children

There’s nothing easy about being a child. Within only half-a-decade from birth, you’re expected to walk, talk, socialize, behave and conform to the “adult” way of your culture. Nowadays, a conversation about emotion and the nuances of life are rarely shared with children outright; instead, children are expected to just grow and guess how the adults have it figured out (we don’t).  This wasn’t always the case though. Several decades ago, a piano composer named Fred Rogers became upset with the way that early television treated its child audience. He was appalled with the silly and slapstick nature of  TV shows aimed at younger audiences. So he put aside his goal of being an ordained Presbyterian minister and set out to create a show that would speak to children at their level, with dignity and sincerity, while also displaying authority and wisdom. And he did exactly that. Every day, Fred Rogers would be “Mister Rogers” to the children of the Pittsburgh area, and then to the rest of the United States. Won’t You be my Neighbor is a very special kind of documentary. It isn’t a biopic on the inner workings of the man Fred Rogers, and it isn’t some history piece detailing Mister Roger’s Neighborhood and the way it came to be renowned in the United States. It’s a barely even a documentary. Really, it’s something far more wholesome. Won’t You be my Neighbor is a celebration of a time long past. It’s a presentation of ideas and ideologies of one genuinely kind man. The film does not go deep into Fred Roger’s personal life, nor does it...
Guatemala missions: a daily journal

Guatemala missions: a daily journal

  Serving with Lipscomb Missions in Guatemala was one of the most fulfilling experiences of my college career. I always expected service and missions work to be physically challenging or difficult, but I was unaware of the incredible experiences that happen working far outside your comfort zone with an incredible team of individuals. The images below were shot on film during our spring break missions trip in Guatemala.     Saturday, March 10, 2018. We were already on a bus by 2:31 a.m. this morning. Each member of our team took a pre-packed bag of medical supplies to check and took what we needed for our week abroad in our carry-ons. The first image of our group leaders was taken during our first layover in the airport at about 10 a.m. We didn’t end up in Guatemala until after 3 p.m. that day. 3:19 pm. Our group split into two groups, one of nursing students who went to Clinica Ezell, and one group who went to the mountains in Chichicastenango to work in mobile clinics in rural Guatemala. I was in the Chichicastenango group, so we had an additional multiple-hour bus ride up the mountains. Upon arrival, we enjoyed our first group devotional with the local mission team, and then we went to sleep. Sunday, March 11, 2018. We rode to church in the backs of pickup trucks today, where we got to worship and spend time with the locals. We played ninja with the children at church and got to eat pizza and socialize with our brothers and sisters in Christ. That evening, we returned to our hotel...
‘Avengers: Infinity War’ packs powerful punch, but is it real? (no spoilers!)

‘Avengers: Infinity War’ packs powerful punch, but is it real? (no spoilers!)

Avengers: Infinity War had a lot of hype to live up to. Ten years in the making gathers a lot of buildup, not only in the story it’s forced to tell, but in the sheer magnitude of characters that must star in such a massive undertaking. With 20+ big-name celebrities such as Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Chris Hemsworth, Robert Downey Jr. and more, the film has a lot of powerful characters to include. One would think this much power all at one time would create a sort of screen-time tug-of-war. While it can seem like a lot at one time, Infinity War triumphantly succeeds in what it had set out to do. Perhaps it’s because the real star isn’t one of these 20+ headliners, but the leading villain, Josh Brolin’s Thanos. One of the biggest qualms about Marvel films has been its lack of dynamic villain characters. Marvel Studios has not yet had a villain as iconic as DC’s The Joker, as Marvel often fails at developing its villains as well as its heroes. DC even had a film dedicated entirely to villains in Suicide Squad, while Marvel’s villains in film still can’t compare to The Joker’s celebrity. While Thanos still doesn’t reach that level, his super-villain character, nonetheless, is developed far beyond the typical Marvel villain. To Thanos, his ideas are noble. Thanos is intent on completing his mission of “killing people to prevent overpopulation,” letting nothing stop him, not even if it means hurting himself in the process. Yet Thanos is far from the brilliant criminal mastermind, with his “success” coming from his sheer power rather than...