Disney and Pixar’s newest film, Onward, holds a magic-filled-tale that takes the viewer on a journey full of laughs, growth, and forgiveness

Disney and Pixar’s newest film, Onward, holds a magic-filled-tale that takes the viewer on a journey full of laughs, growth, and forgiveness

Onward features a family of elves with who lost their father before their youngest son was born. Ian Lightfoot, voiced by Tom Holland, and older brother Barley, voiced by Chris Pratt, are two brothers who could not be more different. Single mom Laurel, voiced by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, has done her best to raise them in little New Mushroomtown. This is a world full of mythical creatures that have found a content life living without their gifts from nature. Magic has long been forgotten in favor of a more efficient and easier solution: Technology. The film begins on Ian’s 16th birthday, when the viewer sees him living a life with which he’s not quite satisfied. His shy tendencies, and not to mention his embarrassing older brother, make it hard for him to feel accepted and comfortable at school. Laurel reveals that their father had left behind a gift for the two sons, only to be given to them once they were both older than 16: A wizard’s staff, an enchanted stone and a spell to bring back their beloved dad for one whole day. Ian turns out to have a natural talent at casting spells, and is able to bring back their father. Well, the lower half of him. With the enchanted stone destroyed, the boys must embark on a quest to find another stone in order to bring back the entirety father before time runs out. Barley, who has a passion for table-top magic games, Ian with the wizard’s staff, and the hilarious pair of legs that is their father head out on their journey in order to be...
The Best and Worst of 2020 Super Bowl Commercials

The Best and Worst of 2020 Super Bowl Commercials

The Kansas City Chiefs stormed back in the last seven minutes to beat the San Francisco 49ers 31-20  during Super Bowl LIV Sunday, but those two teams weren’t the only ones battling for a spot on top. Because of the game’s massive annual viewership, the commercials aired before, during, and after the game can earn brands millions or set them millions behind. According to Fox Sports, some advertisers paid a record-breaking $5.6 million for their spots. But did any of that cash pay off by making connections … or selling products… to viewers? This year, companies used obscure humor and all-star celebrity cameos to make their products pop. In this list, we counted down the best and the worst of 2020’s Super Bowl Commercials. Best of the Best Google: “Remember”  Google has an affinity year after year to pull at our heartstrings with age-old themes like love and sacrifice. This year’s ad is no different. Loretta tells the story of an elderly man, who calls on the app’s “Hey Google” feature to recall the moments and memories of his late wife that he never wants to forget. It’s original, creative, and heartfelt with just enough whimsy to make you smile through your tears. In short, it’s a truly well-done love story told with beautiful imagery that will leave you sobbing. Amazon: “Before Alexa” It’s a simple truth that everyone loves Ellen. So when the talk show mogul and her wife, Portia De Rossi, question what life was like before Amazon’s Alexa, hilarity is sure to ensue. The commercial gives us some memorable, historical iterations of Alexa from a medieval...
Eliminating waste on Lipscomb’s campus

Eliminating waste on Lipscomb’s campus

Reducing plastic on college campuses has been a hot topic in Nashville ever since Vanderbilt completely eliminated single-use plastic on campus earlier this fall. So what is Lipscomb doing to eliminate plastic on campus? “To my knowledge at this point in time there really isn’t any initiative from the campus side or from the dining services side to try to work through eliminating or reducing plastic,” says Director of Dining Services, Wolcott Fairy. “At Vanderbilt, the initiative was driven primarily by the student groups. So as I was reading the article I could see that the students lobbied to the university, and the leadership groups, and was able to have them move into a direction that started with water bottles.” In the past, when students have tried to start initiatives they are quickly turned down. “In the past, the university did have recycling, but in the past couple of years those had been taken away,” says student Hannah Owens. “So one of my good friends and I reached out to an organization on campus to see if recycling could be brought back and to see why it was taken off-campus. They said no other part of the school was supporting recycling and it was too expensive for them. Now if you want to recycle you have to drive off campus, which is not convenient for students who do not have cars here.” SGA President Jack Weber is looking to start a formal recommendation process where SGA members can present a formal proposal to the Board of Trustees. “I think the thing on campus, in terms of what is going...
OPINION: Summer semester is the best semester

OPINION: Summer semester is the best semester

Ah, summer school — A place where (according to the movies) delinquent students who flunk a class during the school year have to spend their summer instead of enjoying vacations. Summer school is a punishment for many a high-schooler, a tool to keep students motivated to do their work or be forced to redo it during their precious break. Summer school in college is rarely talked about in the movies, however: Is summer school still for the unmotivated college students? Is it a punishment for not taking school seriously? It is neither of those. In fact, in my experience, it is the exact opposite. Students who take summer classes during Lipscomb’s summer semester are the most motivated. They want to graduate on time, or graduate early, or in my case graduate with extra degrees that may or may not help with graduate school admissions. Other than the winter semester (known as Wintermester at Lipscomb) Summer Semester is the shortest of the school semesters. In fact, it is broken up into three different semesters that are each five weeks long: Maymester, Junemester, and Julymester (catchy names, I know). Some classes last 10 weeks, throughout two of the semesters. These are called “full-term” summer semester classes, but they are just June and July. This means you can get three credit hours knocked out in five weeks or 10-weeks! Sure, the classes are fast-paced and you typically have to be there every day or for four hours on one day, but most professors I’ve had are efficient teachers and don’t ever hold you the entire length of the class. I’ve also learned...
Letter from the (old) editor: farewell, Lumination

Letter from the (old) editor: farewell, Lumination

It’s actually here. I’m officially an alumna from Lipscomb as of Saturday, which means I’ve passed the Lumination “Editor” mantle on to a new leader. I started serving as editor the summer after my freshman year. When I got started, I remember truly not knowing what to expect, but I also remember truly being excited about what the future held. Now, Lumination Network will be getting a completely new editorial staff since Russell Vannozzi, one of our managing editors, and I have both graduated. Our second managing editor, Spencer Boehme, is a rising junior, but he will be turning to primarily focus on Lumination Radio to serve as the radio sports director. Rising junior Mckenzi Harris will be the new Editor-in-Chief, rising sophomore Kathryn Farris will be one of the managing editors and rising sophomore Erika Plunkett will also serve as a managing editor. As we passed on Lumination to this new leadership team filled with three strong women, I have written this column to offer a few words of advice and to express my gratitude for being able to serve you by bringing the news to the Lipscomb campus. Firstly, pay attention to your student news. Freedom of the press is important, no matter what scale or “level” that press is, whether it’s student news or the New York Times. As a journalism geek, I have a mug with a quote on it by Thomas Jefferson that has resonated with me as I pursue a career in journalism: “Our liberty depends on freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost.” In today’s political climate,...
DC’s latest film ‘Shazam’ captures essence of youth

DC’s latest film ‘Shazam’ captures essence of youth

Childhood is one of the most memorable times in our life — a time where dreams of becoming princesses, astronauts and cowboys are never questioned — when being a superhero was as easy as climbing up the top of the stairs with a blanket tied to your neck, jumping as far as you can, until being defeated by the ultimate super villain. Gravity. Shazam takes those memories, along with action, humor and childhood antics and then wraps it up all in one for a great time for everyone. Zachary Levi (Shazam) was a dark horse for the role of the Great Wizard once the movie was announced in 2017, but his performance captures the warmness and wit that makes Shazam such a great character in all of comic books. Billy Batson (Asher Angel) has been in the foster care system since he was a young child, and he’s only had one person to look out for — himself. That changes when a family takes in the rebellious teen. While reluctantly adjusting to life with a family, he encounters the Great Wizard, Shazam, who champions Batson and bestows his powers to him when Batson says one word, SHAZAM! The highlight of the film is the accuracy of how it would be should a 14-year-old boy actually be granted super powers. The child in everyone relates to Billy with his decisions while being the Great Champion. Again, Levi does an amazing job of harnessing the joy and newness of youth. Angel also gives a wonderful performance as the rebellious teenager creating a sense of understanding from the audience. Originality of Shazam’s...