Olivia’s Way: ‘feminist fashion’ trends

Olivia’s Way: ‘feminist fashion’ trends

It’s been said that a picture is worth a thousand words. And clothing can be too. And what’s better than clothing that makes a statement? Let me introduce everyone to a fashion movement close to my heart: The Feminist Fashion. There are two ends of the reaction spectrum to this growing and ever-important trend: those who are wary, and those who are spiritually and emotionally awakened to the beauty of a period power T-shirt. At this point, maybe you’re wondering what I’m even talking about, and that’s cool. I’m here to show you the wonderful world of empowering clothing. When I say, “feminist fashion,” I mean outfits ranging from the classic “The Future is Female” shirt all the way to the remarkably witty pins, hats and other articles of clothing. But why is this so important? It’s because these articles of clothing are pushing the boundaries of what everyone believes “feminism” to be (I promise it’s not a scary word). Instead of making picket signs and spending hours of our precious time marching, screaming and arguing, we now have a platform to shout louder than we ever could: fashion. And through this universal platform, feminists (and everyone who believes in equality) are finally able to proudly wear and show what they believe, without having to say a word. Don’t get me wrong, I am the first one to march and argue and make “punny” equality signs, but it’s also nice to use my body as a walking equality sign! Like Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie says, “Culture does not make people. People make culture.” And we are the ones making the...
Olivia’s Way: ‘one size fits all’

Olivia’s Way: ‘one size fits all’

“One Size Fits All” — a phrase that makes me, along with most women, shudder. Maybe it’s because I usually don’t shop (and when I do it’s at Goodwill), but I really thought this “One Size” tag had gone away. Sadly, I was wrong. At my new job in retail I have discovered multiple articles of clothing claiming to fit everyone and every body type. So I decided to give it a shot with a pair of dark green leggings. I could barely make it past my knees. At first, I felt embarrassed, chubby and angry, but then I realized that I’m not 12 years old anymore, and I actually have curves now. As women, our weight fluctuates all the time. This is normal, ladies. Whether we’re going through stress or a hard time, or even a really good/exciting phase of life, our bodies react differently to each season. Many thin women can feel threatened by the fact that the majority of people attack stores like Brandy Melville for catering to smaller sizes. But that’s not why these stores are attacked. They are attacked for the limited sizing, scarce variety in model types and even “cookie-cutter” retail associates who work in the front of the store. Even during the interview process for stores like Brandy, a lot of applicants report that the store managers will take multiple pictures of them and what they’re wearing, not saying what the images are for. Ruby Seid, a sales associate for Brandy Melville, said she has noticed this bias as well. “I think, to be honest, the real reason why they hired me is...
Living as a black man in America: thoughts on the wrongful shooting of Stephon Clark

Living as a black man in America: thoughts on the wrongful shooting of Stephon Clark

As a young kid, my mom played “Changes” by Tupac Shakur every time we drove around in my hometown of Tullahoma, Tennessee. “That’s just the way it is, Things will never be the same” — lyrics I think about every time I see a shooting of an unarmed black man. Recently, Stephon Clark, 22, was shot and killed in the backyard of his grandmother’s Sacramento home, after police suspected he had a gun. Later, the police discovered it was only a cell phone. In weeks since the shooting, protests were held in Sacramento that shut down a Sacramento Kings game. This week, Clark’s funeral was held in a South Sacramento church, where family and friends said their goodbyes to Clark. He left behind a wife and two daughters. Watching the body camera of the Clark shooting, you can see the policeman chasing him into the backyard, then stopping and taking cover at the side of the house. The two officers then shoot him eight times, mostly in the back. Once Clark is on the ground, you can hear police officers tell him to get up. You then hear one of the officers say “Hey mute?” and then the audio is cut off. The pressure and risk that the police go through in their jobs goes without question. Not all police are bad. But there are other ways to deal with a suspect then to fatally shoot them, and Stephon Clark’s shooting shows a lack compassion from the police. In the video, Clark is shown running away from them and stopped at a considerable distance away from the officers. At...
‘Ready Player One’ escapes reality into virtual world

‘Ready Player One’ escapes reality into virtual world

Stephen Spielberg is back again, just three months after the release of The Post. This time around, he’s having a lot more fun in the directing chair with Ready Player One. Ready Player One takes place in the near future of 2045 where most people are captivated with a virtual reality world called the “Oasis” that was created by a Bill Gates-type character named James Halliday (Mark Rylance). The story follows Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan), a very stereotypical teen who finds his escape in the video game world of the Oasis. He enters into a competition, engineered by Halliday, that sets him on a mission to find three keys that unlock the door to ownership and control of the Oasis. After earning the first key in an adrenaline-fueled race at the wheel of the DeLorean, Wade, also known by his in-game name Parzival, joins forces with his best friend Aech (Lena Waithe) and the famous Art3mis (Olivia Cooke) on his quest for the keys. Together, they travel back into the recorded memories of Halliday to search for clues, while fighting off the forces of the evil corporation IOI (Innovative Online Industries), helmed by CEO Nolan Sorrento (Ben Mendelsohn). Ready Player One is co-written by Ernest Cline, the author of the novel. And it’s easy to tell. In trying to stay loyal to the source material, Cline has crammed as much of the book as he can into the film. This makes for an exposition-heavy first fifteen minutes of the film that is filled to the brim with information about the world in an already lengthy two hour and 20...
Falling short in NCAA tourney shouldn’t diminish Lipscomb’s historic season

Falling short in NCAA tourney shouldn’t diminish Lipscomb’s historic season

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Season-ending losses are typically filled with tears and disappointment, frustration of what could have been had a certain play or shot fallen differently. But when Lipscomb lost to North Carolina by a score of 84-66 in the first round of the NCAA basketball tournament on Friday, it didn’t bring the type of shock that usually comes in March. Yes, there were a few hung heads and some tears from the Bisons, who had hoped to pull an upset against the defending national champions. However, when the team returned to their Holiday Inn in uptown Charlotte, the lobby wasn’t filled with sadness. Seniors Aaron Korn and George Brammeier were seen hugging family members. Rob Marberry took a seat on a couch to talk with friends, sporting a bruise after taking an elbow to the face early in the game. Other players opted to get up to their rooms and pack for the team’s charter flight back to Nashville. Junior forward Eli Pepper leaned over to me and said, “We’ll be back…just need to put together a 40-minute performance next year.” There were no signs of a crushing defeat. How could anyone be overly upset? The Bisons won their first-ever ASUN tournament title and stood their ground in their March Madness debut. “It’s an honor just to be part of this Lipscomb basketball team and what the program has become,” sophomore guard Kenny Cooper said. “(Making) our first tournament and being part of (the Big Dance) exceeded our expectations.” Sure, it’s cliché to say that one loss doesn’t define an otherwise successful season, or to call the team...
So you’re saying there’s a chance?: Bisons face long odds in NCAA tourney

So you’re saying there’s a chance?: Bisons face long odds in NCAA tourney

Sunday’s TBS Selection Show brought plenty of anticipation as the Lipscomb basketball team learned the destination of its first-ever NCAA tournament game. The answer? A date with the North Carolina Tar Heels in Charlotte. After the initial excitement wore off, a harsh reality set in: the Bisons must take down Goliath for their season to extend past Friday’s matchup against the defending national champions. Nearly every national analyst has picked the Tar Heels to win, and rightfully so. Coached by Roy Williams, North Carolina has won seven national titles and is routinely in the hunt for a Final Four berth. Most Vegas oddsmakers have the Tar Heels as a 19-point favorite against the Bisons. But North Carolina hasn’t been untouchable this season. While most of their losses came against highly ranked teams, the Tar Heels dropped a 79-75 contest to Wofford on Dec. 20 at home. Just three days earlier, Tennessee came within five points of beating the Tar Heels in Knoxville. Nonetheless, ESPN’s Matchup Predictor gave the Bisons just a 3.3 percent chance of beating the 25-10 Tar Heels. The Athletic’s Ken Pomeroy echoed those sentiments, giving Lipscomb a 4.1 percent chance of reaching the second round. Other media outlets acknowledged Lipscomb’s outside chance at an upset. SB Nation’s Alex Kirshner listed the game his “Category 4: It’s possible. Don’t laugh” upset pick, while Tennessee State coach Dana Ford told 104.5 The Zone’s Midday 180 show that the Bisons’ shooting prowess makes them a contender. “I like Lipscomb’s chances because in order to win in (the NCAA) tournament as a lower seed, you must make threes,” Ford told...