Holiday Entertainment- commuting home edition

Holiday Entertainment- commuting home edition

While Covid is on the rise and traveling is discouraged, the campus is closed and that means most students have to commute home.  Whether you are driving to visit family or flying back home, a good holiday commute should be filled with music, podcasts and movies.  I grew up in a Christmas fanatic family. We are most easily comparable to the Griswolds and there is no denying it. Our yard stays filled with lights till the end of January and the Christmas season begins before thanksgiving — sometimes even before Halloween.  All that said, I would consider myself somewhat of an expert in holiday music and movies.  We can start with music. Here are my top favorite songs for the Christmas season this year. Ribbons and Bows — Kacey Musgraves Not Christmas till you come Home — by Norah Jones White Christmas — George Ezra It’s been a year — Stephen Day You’re a mean one Mr. Grinch — Tyler the Creator Merry Christmas Darling — The Carpenters Santa Claus is coming to town — The Jackson 5 Step into Christmas — Elton John Another Wonderful Christmas — Joey and Rory Up on the Housetop — Pentatonix Check back for some of my top favorite Holiday Movies! Have a happy holidays! xoxo,...
Students don’t mince words when describing Fall 2020

Students don’t mince words when describing Fall 2020

Tim Ghianni, adjunct professor/journalist-in-residence, asked his Multimedia Storytelling class to choose one word that best described this unusual semester and then explain it. Some needed more than one word.  Other students may see a bit of themselves in the following short essays: Unmotivating & Exhausting Don’t get me wrong, this semester has definitely not been all bad. But I think we can all admit, COVID sucks! It has been hard to focus on school work with everything going on, and a lot of times I have felt completely drained. Sometimes I even get the “what’s the point attitude?” Which really sucks. I have had ups and downs with motivation— some days I’m eager to work, and on others work is the last thing on my mind. It feels like we were go-go-going without being able to take a break or even a breath. Pretty much all of my teachers have been understanding, which I really appreciate. This semester has not been an easy one… But it has been one to appreciate the smaller moments of joy in between all the doom and gloom stuff. Hopefully, this will be a season of being more grateful, humble, and understanding than ever before! I like to think something good will come out of all this. -Josephine Ballard Blessed When I think of the semester that is coming to a close in hindsight, my word is blessed. When I think of the moments that were difficult, I would say overwhelming, but when I think about how those two things work together, I think that I feel lucky. At the beginning of the semester,...
Thanksgiving with COVID: Students describe how unwanted ‘guest’ flavors holidays

Thanksgiving with COVID: Students describe how unwanted ‘guest’ flavors holidays

Adjunct professor Tim Ghianni, journalist-in-residence at Lipscomb, asked his 21st Century Media students to ponder the holidays, their traditions and what COVID-19 will or will not spoil this year. Here are some of their responses: Extra cautious because of grandparents My extended family loves being together. Both on my mom’s side of the family and my dad’s. We alternate each year who we spend each holiday with, and each year it is always a blast, laughing together, playing games, sharing memories and just having that time to slow down and just spend time together. Leading up to this year’s holiday season, I think we all feared that we would not be able to spend time together. Thankfully, my family’s holiday plans have not changed drastically because of COVID, but a few things leading up to the holiday season have had to change. I  know for me personally, I had a few trips planned recently that I was really looking forward to, but because I knew that I would be spending Thanksgiving with my grandparents, I had to cancel those trips. Both myself and my brother have had to be extra cautious in these last few days at Lipscomb in preparation for spending time with my grandparents. … I know so many are not even able to be with anyone outside of their immediate family for this holiday season. So many things have been taken away from us this year because of COVID, and it is unfortunate that such a joyful time such as Thanksgiving and Christmas has to be taken away as well. But, hopefully we can all come away from...
“Vote your voice” : Student Opinion

“Vote your voice” : Student Opinion

With the presidential election less than a month away, those who have the opportunity to vote need to understand the power they hold. We were all taught about voting to some extent in school, but with everything else going on, why does it really matter? Heleena Kabtimer, a junior International Business Management major, said, “As a person of color and a woman, there’s so many times when voting in our history has not been provided to someone like me. Now that I can use my voice to vote in elections, all those people didn’t fight for me to not use it.” Suffrage is a privilege, a time when people get to use their voice to stand up for what they believe in. Concerning people who choose not to vote, Jessica Heffington, a senior Accounting major, claims she understands people choose not to vote for various reasons, but said, “If you choose not to, then you can’t be mad at the outcome.” Both Kabtimer and Heffington admit they did not vote when they first turned eighteen. The main reason was that it wasn’t a presidential election year. Local elections don’t garner nearly as much attention as federal elections, but looking back Kabtimer wishes she understood that local elections are actually just as important as federal elections. “Every town, city, and state is different and those who live there should have a say in what affects them every day,” Heffington said. A common obstacle to first-time voters is not knowing how the voting process works. Kiana Rafiei, a junior Psychology major, thinks schools need to better prepare students to go out...
A canceled match turns into a canceled season for Lipscomb men’s golf team

A canceled match turns into a canceled season for Lipscomb men’s golf team

By Anica Gilbert, Ben Browning, Riley Hoag and Casey King Lipscomb men’s golf team had a lot of potential before the COVID-19 national emergency ended the season and cut those hopes short. “We were on a trajectory to the postseason,” said coach Will Brewer. “That’s what our goal was at the beginning of August and we had a great shot. “Everyone was coming together and playing well. The team was really gelling.” Brewer said.”The team was stunned as they watched a canceled match turn into a canceled season. The team had high hopes and a promising chance at continuing to the postseason.” Then came COVID-19. “They were very emotional, very shocked and a lot of disbelief,” said coach Brewer. “The best part of the season was before everything got shut down because the team was working hard and pushing each other,” said freshman Gregor Mckenzie. “We had something nice going with the team, where everybody was concerned about each other, and everyone was accountable for what they were doing.” For senior Conner McKay, relationships with his teammates were especially important, he started adding that the talks with his teammates led him to redefine his faith and relationship with God. “This year was different because of the chemistry. I started to grow in my faith and a couple of guys on the team introduced me to the Bible for the first time,” McKay said. “About a month ago I accepted Christ as my Lord and savior.” Despite the ups and downs, the team is continuing to move forward in training for next year’s matches, but with all golf courses being...
Lumination staffers share their social-distancing experiences

Lumination staffers share their social-distancing experiences

The importance of family time, the joy of TV binge-watching, missing contact with friends in classes, worrying about the illness, learning how to sew, reading books or becoming aware of how important it is to wash your hands are just a few things that have occupied students’ minds in the weeks since spring break and the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown. Here are some of the thoughts and worries from the Lipscomb students in adjunct Tim Ghianni’s Practicum in Journalism. Chances are that fellow students will recognize themselves in these short essays: The thought of being locked in your house without face to face contact with the outside world is terrifying, especially for someone with a go-getter personality. That go-getter would be me. I am the type to try and fill every second of the day with productive tasks, oftentimes making more work for myself just to keep from what I would say is “wasted time.” Throughout quarantine, I have re-learned the art of relaxing. I don’t remember the last time I was able to just sit and watch a movie or hang out with my family just because. While I know this won’t last forever, there are several lessons I’ve learned that I plan to take with me out of quarantine. Most of them are simple, but I’ve learned they are crucial for my mental health. I plan to take more time to enjoy family and friends and just hang out. Life is too short to occupy each second with strenuous working and being “productive.” I also plan to spend more time on the things I love, like photography and art. I...