20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

“A plane just hit one of the World Trade Center Towers.” R. Samuel Lynn, Lipscomb veterans advocate and a former Marine, recalls hearing those words from his desk at an architectural firm in upstate New York on Sept. 11, 2001. He immediately thought that a small plane must have mistakenly gone off course. “It seemed like just a couple of minutes later [that the secretary] … slow-walked into the office,” Sam Lynn said. “[Her] face was just white. She said, ‘Another plane just hit one of the towers.'” “And that’s when … my heart hit my toes.” Lynn and his colleagues watched the news channel all day, as most Americans did, and realized that they were witnessing a terrorist attack against the United States. The event would alter the trajectory of America and the world– they knew “it was all going to change.” Lynn was right about the changes, which included the creation of The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the United State’s engagement in war in the Middle East. The attack was the impetus for 20 years of consequences. Four years after 9/11, Lynn became a Marine. He spent 10 years in the military and completed two tours of duty in the Middle East with Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was injured during his service. After rehabilitation, he became a combat marksmanship instructor. Today, he serves the Lipscomb University Community as director of Veterans Services. Lynn’s has a multi-level view on the events, since he experienced the events of 9/11 as a civilian and then participated in the war that followed as a Marine. Veteran Programs Coordinator Jimmie L....
McQueen addresses students during first Gathering as president

McQueen addresses students during first Gathering as president

On her first day as Lipscomb University’s 18th president, Dr. Candice McQueen made several announcements during Tuesday’s Gathering. After introductions from SGA President Grant Hitchcock and her daughter, freshman Abigail McQueen, Dr. McQueen made her entrance on the podium. McQueen, greeted by a warm round of applause from the audience, cited the students as the primary reason for accepting this leadership position. “Lipscomb University exists for students,” said McQueen. “And we will empower our community, our administrators to make sure students are job one, and we will live out the visions of our founders to help you, our students, to be equipped to fully integrate with your academic passions and careers. McQueen made a few special announcements, such as the start of the President’s Student Advisory Council, otherwise known as PSAC. PSAC will allow McQueen to directly hear feedback from students through a collaborative effort with the SGA. Nominations for council members are ongoing, with the council set to be announced toward the end of September. To make up for the sophomore class’ lost opportunities, McQueen revealed that next week will be sophomore week. At the start of the week, sophomores will receive a gift package filled with an assortment of treats as well as tickets to events that lead up to an exclusive silent disco party. McQueen addressed and confirmed that the recent dining staff shortages and restaurant closures were due to a COVID outbreak. To make up for the inconvenience, students were treated to a cookout of hamburgers and hot dogs as an appreciation for their patience and willingness to cooperate with the staff shortages. Finally, McQueen recognized...
Labor Day: The history behind our day off

Labor Day: The history behind our day off

Every year, students of all ages look forward to the first Monday of September, whether that holds an end-of-summer get together or a break from an already busy school year. But where exactly did Labor Day come from, and why is it a significant holiday in the history of America? The story of Labor Day starts with the labor movements of the late 19th century. Conditions for American workers at the time were notoriously bad. Twelve-hour workdays and unsanitary factories made their jobs dangerous, and benefits (such as health care) were either severely limited or non-existent. There were also no laws protecting child workers, who were often subjected to particularly unsafe jobs, like getting into and cleaning out chimneys, because of their small size.  To protest their unfair treatment, labor unions across the country organized strikes, some of which were more violent than others. In the infamous Pullman strike of 1894, the American Railroad Union led a nationwide boycott of Pullman Palace train cars to protest wage cuts. The strike ended only when the government sent troops to Chicago, which triggered a series of deadly riots. Such shocking events caused many writers, photographers, activists, and politicians to turn their focus to exposing the horrors of factories, helping workers fight for their rights, and pushing for legislators to make serious changes. As greater awareness of the plight of workers began to spread, many advocated for a holiday to celebrate American workers and their contributions to society. In 1887, Oregon became the first state to recognize Labor Day as an official holiday, and four other states (Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and...
Convocation marks new year and welcoming of new president

Convocation marks new year and welcoming of new president

With the tolling of the bell, Tuesday’s Presidential Convocation officially marked the start of the 2021-2022 school year, with outgoing President Randy Lowry and his successor Dr. Candice McQueen both looking toward the future. McQueen said she formed three phrases to help everyone navigate through this academic year together. The first is “being a light,” she said. That starts by learning and growing in Christ, whether it be through plugging in at the Gathering, breakouts, classes, discussions with friends or even at your local church, McQueen said. “Being a light will force us to put away our selfish ways and demands that we actually put a spotlight on [Jesus] and others,” she said. Then comes “bringing your best,” she said, noting that means to reach out for others who cannot do for themselves.  She said the community members must be prepared to encourage others, while also holding themselves accountable to a high bar. “Bringing your best requires forethought, intention and discipline—it does not just happen,” Finally, she said it is a matter of beginning the process.  “Take the first step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step,” she said,  quoting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “Although no one can go back and make a brand-new start, anyone can start now and make a brand-new ending,” she said. A highlight from the event was the presentation of the Kopio Award, given to Dr. Carl McKelvey. McKelvey,  the executive vice president of the Center for Spiritual Renewal, has been a part of the Lipscomb community for nearly 70 years (recently celebrating his 90th birthday)....
Lipscomb closes majority of dining options due to staffing issues

Lipscomb closes majority of dining options due to staffing issues

Lipscomb announced Tuesday morning that campus dining is experiencing “industry-wide” staffing issues due to COVID and the national labor shortage. “Many industries across the country are experiencing staffing shortages due to labor availability and health concerns. Unfortunately, from time to time these challenges also affect the Lipscomb community,”said the university in an email to students. “This week, Sodexo, our partner that operates and staffs Lipscomb Dining operations, is experiencing a staffing shortage across their Nashville operations which has an impact on the number of employees who are available to staff the various dining locations on our campus.” Toss, Blue Coast Burrito, Au Bon Pain, Chick-fil-A and Creekstone will be closed for the foreseeable future. Lipscomb also warned students that open dining establishments are likely to experience longer than normal wait times. This story is developing. Lumination will continue to update you on the dining closures. ...
In letter to campus community, Lipscomb Academy addresses ‘never appropriate’ Trent Dilfer sideline actions

In letter to campus community, Lipscomb Academy addresses ‘never appropriate’ Trent Dilfer sideline actions

Lipscomb Academy has addressed the controversy sparked by head football coach Trent Dilfer’s actions Friday night during a game against Independence High School. A viral video surfaced after the game on Friday night that has amassed over 11.4 million views on TikTok, the popular video sharing service. The video shows head coach and former Super Bowl-winning NFL quarterback Dilfer grabbing and pushing his starting tight end, Beau Dawson. During the altercation, Dawson throws his helmet, which causes Dilfer to verbally reprimand him as well. BroBible, an account featuring sports highlights and lifestyle videos for athletes, posted the video that took off over the weekend, and social media users across all platforms have come to the defense of both player and coach. Dawson, a senior, is the son of Phil Dawson, another NFL veteran who played as a kicker for 20 years. The Mustangs’ special-teams coordinator, Phil is a longtime friend of Dilfer dating back to their professional days. In an email to the Lipscomb Academy community obtained by Lumination Network, Head of School Brad Schultz and Associate Head of School for Athletics Michelle York stated that it is “never appropriate for a Lipscomb employee to have a physical response with a student while frustrated or angry” and that they “are confident a similar event will not happen in the future.” The email reads in full: “Many of you by now are probably aware of an unfortunate incident between our head football coach, Trent Dilfer, and one of his players at this past Friday’s game. “Coach Dilfer apologized to the player, issued a comprehensive public statement on social media, and discussed the...