Breaking: Indoor Mask Mandate extended until January 31st

Breaking: Indoor Mask Mandate extended until January 31st

The indoor mask mandate on campus has been extended until January 31st. Lipscomb students were informed of the news via an email sent out Thursday Afternoon by Dr. Matt Paden, executive vice president. “This week we have experienced the highest positivity rate in our community over the last 18 months due to a spike in cases as a result of the presence of the omicron variant as well as a significant number of cases of the flu among students,” said Paden in the email to students. According to the Campus COVID Statistics, the number of positive COVID Tests increased tremendously this week. More than 40 positive tests occurred on January 18. “As we continue to do what we can to minimize the impact of the virus and its variants in our community, the indoor mask mandate is extended through Monday, Jan. 31.” Students, faculty, staff, and guests are expected to wear masks throughout all university buildings, regardless of vaccination status. “We will continue to monitor the situation and adjust as appropriate,” Paden assured students in the email “We are hopeful that we are about to reach a plateau and that we will soon be on the downside of this spike.”  Photo by Cora...
Classes remain in-person, on schedule; masks required indoors through Jan. 31

Classes remain in-person, on schedule; masks required indoors through Jan. 31

As the upcoming semester gears up, questions have been circling over the current rise in COVID cases across the state and postponements of in-person learning for other area universities. Lipscomb notified students and faculty via email on Tuesday morning that the university will welcome back students for in-person learning as previously planned.  “We continue to believe that it will take every member of the Bison Herd doing their part to ensure we can have a productive and engaging semester,” said Dr. Matt Paden, executive vice president, in his email to students.  “An effective way to mitigate the spread of the virus is to wear a mask.” Lipscomb is “temporarily” reinstating the indoor mask mandate for students, faculty and guests regardless of vaccination status. Masks will be required indoors through Jan. 21. Lipscomb has since updated the policy and extended the mask mandate to Jan. 31. “The CDC, as well as state and local health officials, recommend wearing an N95 or KN95 mask if possible,” Paden said. “These masks provide the greatest protection of everyone against the virus. We will continue to monitor the situation and adjust as appropriate.” Vaccinations are additionally being encouraged by the university. Free COVID vaccine and booster drives are scheduled to take place this semester on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 1-3 p.m. in Bennett Campus Center. University faculty (including student workers) are “currently required to comply” with the OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) federal vaccine mandate for employers with 100 or more employees. This means, before Jan. 10, Lipscomb employees will be required to receive the COVID vaccine to adhere to federal guidelines. “The U.S. Supreme Court has...
Lighting of the Green returns to bring Christmas spirit

Lighting of the Green returns to bring Christmas spirit

Students, family members and Nashville residents gathered on Lipscomb’s campus Tuesday night to celebrate the 17th Lighting of the Green. It is an annual tradition hosted by Amy Grant that ushers its attendees into the holiday mood.  Some family-friendly festivities began as early as 4 p.m. including a photo opportunity with Santa for the children and a holiday market with specialty vendors.  When the sun went down and the many Christmas lights began to glow brighter, the concert began. The grass outside of the Student Activities Center that usually lies empty was converted into a space for hundreds, complete with a large stage, speakers and seats for guests.  Since the event was entirely virtual last year, many expressed their feelings on returning in person.  “Are you happy to be back live this year?” asked NewsChannel 5’s Leland Stanton, the emcee for the event. He received delighted applause from the audience.  The opening act was Lipscomb Academy’s chorus followed by Amy Grant’s first appearance. Grant has been with the event since its first show almost two decades ago.  “I cannot believe we’ve been doing this for 17 years,” said Grant. “It’s so wonderful that you all made the effort – I have no idea where you parked or how far you walked!”  Her second song was her own classic “Tennessee Christmas.” CeCe Winans, a well-known gospel artist, performed next. “Alright, it’s Christmas,” Winans said before jumping into her upbeat performance. Let’s have some fun!” There were several other songs from the university choir and Corinna Gill, who is Grant’s daughter. Not only was there abundant Christmas music featured, but some clips...
Dates to know for upcoming breaks 

Dates to know for upcoming breaks 

As the winter holidays are approaching, students in dorms are expected to go home and are therefore not allowed to remain in the residence halls. If you are living on campus, below are some upcoming dates to keep in mind. For Thanksgiving break:  Halls close on Nov. 20 at 10 a.m.   Halls reopen Nov. 27 at 6 p.m.  For Winter break:  Halls close on Dec. 16th at 1 p.m.  For graduating students, halls close on Dec. 18th at 6 p.m. Halls reopen Jan. 8th at 6 p.m. For the holiday dining hours, you can find those...
Sigma Alpha embraces cryptocurrency, accepts Bitcoin as dues

Sigma Alpha embraces cryptocurrency, accepts Bitcoin as dues

Of the several social clubs at Lipscomb, only one will accept your club dues through Bitcoin. Sigma Alpha is pioneering the introduction of cryptocurrency to college organizations.  Sigma Alpha started in 2019 and is a smaller and relatively newer club that prides itself on its recent innovation. Sean Hagan, a junior philosophy major from Nashville, introduced the idea of incorporating Bitcoin.  Hagan is the president of the club and sees Bitcoin as a way for his younger group to build their reputation as well as their finances. This fall was the first semester that members were able to pay their dues in Bitcoin instead of dollars.  “We have to find these creative solutions and innovative ways to protect and maintain at least what we do have, potentially build our purchasing power, and increase what we’re able to do,” Hagan said.  Bitcoin is a relatively new and upcoming currency that takes place all digitally. Unlike fiat currency, government-backed money like the U.S. dollar, there is no paper trail.  Even before it was officially created in 2009, Bitcoin has had an interesting and somewhat mysterious history.  “Bitcoin is a digital asset. It was created in the wake of the [economic] crises by the man or entity under the pseudonym of Satoshi Nakamoto,” Hagan said.   The identity of Nakamoto is entirely unknown. Prior to Bitcoin’s creation, it published a paper that explained its function and use.  “It’s built on the concept of digital scarcity,” Hagan said. “There are only 21 million bitcoins that will ever be in supply.”  Bitcoin’s set value is what makes it stand out from other value systems such...
20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

“A plane just hit one of the World Trade Center Towers.” R. Samuel Lynn, Lipscomb veterans advocate and a former Marine, recalls hearing those words from his desk at an architectural firm in upstate New York on Sept. 11, 2001. He immediately thought that a small plane must have mistakenly gone off course. “It seemed like just a couple of minutes later [that the secretary] … slow-walked into the office,” Sam Lynn said. “[Her] face was just white. She said, ‘Another plane just hit one of the towers.'” “And that’s when … my heart hit my toes.” Lynn and his colleagues watched the news channel all day, as most Americans did, and realized that they were witnessing a terrorist attack against the United States. The event would alter the trajectory of America and the world– they knew “it was all going to change.” Lynn was right about the changes, which included the creation of The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the United State’s engagement in war in the Middle East. The attack was the impetus for 20 years of consequences. Four years after 9/11, Lynn became a Marine. He spent 10 years in the military and completed two tours of duty in the Middle East with Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was injured during his service. After rehabilitation, he became a combat marksmanship instructor. Today, he serves the Lipscomb University Community as director of Veterans Services. Lynn’s has a multi-level view on the events, since he experienced the events of 9/11 as a civilian and then participated in the war that followed as a Marine. Veteran Programs Coordinator Jimmie L....