Lipscomb announces intent to return to campus for fall semester

Lipscomb announces intent to return to campus for fall semester

Ever since the close of the spring semester, uncertainty has been in the air over the slowly approaching fall semester. Lipscomb announced its intention to move ahead on the fall semester; however, what that will look like depends on a variety of factors in the coming months. “The challenge is really how do you figure out how to bring 1,500 people back and live in dorms two to a room and use a common bathroom down the hall and take care of those that might get sick along the way,” said President Randy Lowry in a video call to faculty on May 7. A return to campus would come with potential adjustments, due to the spread of COVID-19 across the country. “The No. 1 concern will be our health security,” said Lowry, announcing his intentions to appoint a new director of Health and Wellness. Lipscomb follows in the steps of several other colleges and universities, each grappling with the impact of COVID-19. “We also are planning to be able to open not just the middle of August, but also right after Labor Day, and also the first of October,” Lowry said. “Students generally are not going to change their plans, especially if we have through the summer done all the things we’re trying to do to connect with them. They can tolerate three weeks online before we open the door.” Another possible plan mentioned by Lowry was an early finish before Thanksgiving. “Now, that may sound kind of screwy, but that’s a 12-week period of time,” Lowry said. “It’s essentially what a quarter would be in the other system....
Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb’s 129th graduation ceremony looked quite different than was expected when the school year began in August. Allen Arena, which typically hosts the celebratory event, sat empty on Saturday when the COVID-19 outbreak forced the university to host its first virtual graduation. From the charge to the alma mater, Lipscomb faculty and students combined live and pre-recorded clips to create an all-new commencement ceremony experience. President Randy Lowry opened the commencement ceremony with a video pre-recorded in Allen Arena. “Well this isn’t exactly like I imagined it,” Lowry said. “Here I am standing in Allen Arena, and if this was a normal moment: Students you would be here with me. You would be dressed in caps and gowns, and there would be five thousand people surrounding us as this amazing moment took place. We would march in, we’d hear the bagpipes; the faculty would follow a little bit later. You’d be on the stage walking across, I’d shake your hand, and you would have your college degree, your graduate degree. You would have completed this moment, and the celebration would be wonderful. “The reality is we all know that this is a different time. And we’re giving up something:We’re giving our Allen Arena moment in order to protect others,” said  Lowry. One of the many faculty members joining  Lowry in conducting the online ceremony, Dean of Community Life Prentice Ashford gave out the Stephen Marsh Award. “Steve was a 1977 Lipscomb graduate and the son of one of our former board members, Lee Marsh,” said Ashford. “He was a Christian example in every aspect of his life as a...
Lipscomb IDEAL Program’s first virtual graduation

Lipscomb IDEAL Program’s first virtual graduation

The Lipscomb IDEAL Program used Facebook to hold its 2020 graduation ceremony. Professors, internship supervisors, advisers and peer mentors made videos congratulating these students on their accomplishments during their time at Lipscomb. Graduate Molly Bruns received the Miss Sunshine Award.  “She is so outgoing, social and so involved on campus. She did so well with her academics, but also made lots of new friends,” said Bruns’ adviser Sarah Roe-Hall.s. Graduates Saul Buda and Hassun Syed’s internship supervisor, commissioner Brad Turner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, made an appearance in the videos as well.  “Saul, I love when you would be in the office with me, and we would talk a little bit about sports,” said Turner. “Hassun, I used to always love when you come to my office every morning to shake hands, or give me a high five, or say hello to see how I was doing”. Graduate Erin Campbell’s professor, Scott Sager, spoke on Campbell’s achievements at Lipscomb.  “Your last project in the class was outstanding, and I have shown it to others to show them what good work looks like, and I want you to know how proud I am,” said Sager.  Al Surgeon, the dean of Student Life, closed the celebration. “We are so proud of your accomplishments,” he said. “It has been a great honor for us to watch you succeed here. You bring us so much joy. That is my prayer of blessing for you on this special...
Lumination staffers share their social-distancing experiences

Lumination staffers share their social-distancing experiences

The importance of family time, the joy of TV binge-watching, missing contact with friends in classes, worrying about the illness, learning how to sew, reading books or becoming aware of how important it is to wash your hands are just a few things that have occupied students’ minds in the weeks since spring break and the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown. Here are some of the thoughts and worries from the Lipscomb students in adjunct Tim Ghianni’s Practicum in Journalism. Chances are that fellow students will recognize themselves in these short essays: The thought of being locked in your house without face to face contact with the outside world is terrifying, especially for someone with a go-getter personality. That go-getter would be me. I am the type to try and fill every second of the day with productive tasks, oftentimes making more work for myself just to keep from what I would say is “wasted time.” Throughout quarantine, I have re-learned the art of relaxing. I don’t remember the last time I was able to just sit and watch a movie or hang out with my family just because. While I know this won’t last forever, there are several lessons I’ve learned that I plan to take with me out of quarantine. Most of them are simple, but I’ve learned they are crucial for my mental health. I plan to take more time to enjoy family and friends and just hang out. Life is too short to occupy each second with strenuous working and being “productive.” I also plan to spend more time on the things I love, like photography and art. I...
Coronavirus Prevention Tips and more from office of Health Services

Coronavirus Prevention Tips and more from office of Health Services

Lipscomb’s director of Health Services tells students “there is no reason to panic” about COVID-19, but there are steps to take to prevent the illness. “The group we need to be the most careful with are the elderly, over the age of 60 years, and those with chronic diseases especially those with compromised immune systems,” said Erin Keckley, the health director. “This virus is spread by respiratory droplets,” said Keckley, “So when you cough or sneeze, these droplets float in the air and then eventually land on a surface. Some common symptoms of this virus are fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Some less frequent symptoms are headache, sore throat, or diarrhea. And, of course, it has been proven to induce dangerous blood clots and has been deadly in thousands of cases. The incubation period is two to 14 days. Keckley provided these simple tips to cut down on chances of contracting the disease: Make sure you are washing your hands. This is the single most important thing you can do. It is also important to be washing for at least 20 seconds or more and using soap and water. Keckley said, ” Take a song, make sure it’s at least 20 seconds long, and sing along.” Try to leave hand sanitizer in different places like your car, backpack, or room. Don’t shake hands. Cover your mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then, throw that tissue away. Clean and disinfect surfaces, like kitchen and bathroom counters. Try to avoid touching your face. Viruses are often transmitted through your mucus membrane through your hands, nose, and mouth....
Student Government offices filled via e-mail balloting; Five freshmen additions coming in the fall

Student Government offices filled via e-mail balloting; Five freshmen additions coming in the fall

Forty students ran for 27 open office positions on next year’s Student Government Association (SGA). Because of the COVID-19 pandemic that closed campus, this year’s elections were held via e-mail. Five additional senator positions representing the freshman class will be filled when the new students arrive to Lipscomb in the fall. Below is a list of the SGA office position winners. Check back for interviews with the new SGA officers. Executive Officers: President: Mimi Vance Vice President: Dexter Woods Secretary: Rylee Russell Treasurer: Grant Lander Senior Class Senators: Chloe Allen Adelia Birdwell Elliot Forst Ellis Osburn Erin Stanley Junior Class Senators: Grant Bobo Grace Davis Carson Freund Megan Hinerman Grant Hitchcock Sophomore Class Senators: Adele Brothers Dumebi Ene Liz McKell Angie Medina Galeaz Hannah Mulzer At-Large Senators: Madi Ford Will Huff Lorena Maury Mackenzie McConnell Nate Messer Fiona O’Neal Donovan Ross Patrick...