Eagles’ dominant second half proves too much for the Bisons

Eagles’ dominant second half proves too much for the Bisons

Lipscomb came off of a split last weekend with UNF and looked poised to bounce back against the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles, but the Bisons were unable to stop the Eagles who outplayed Lipscomb in the second half and won by a score of 79-69. With an 11-0 run to start off the game for Lipscomb, things looked optimistic in the first half. However, from there, FGCU went on a 19-4 scoring run that had them up midway through the first half by four.  The Bisons managed to claw their way back towards the end of the half with a three-pointer from sophomore guard KJ Johnson, free throws from senior guard Romeao Ferguson and hustle plays from senior forward Parker Hazen. With the late surge in the first half, Lipscomb found themselves ahead 36-32 going into the halftime break. With a fairly even first half from the conference foes, the question was who would pull ahead in the second half. As Lipscomb has been struggling to hold leads in recent matchups, the Bisons were hoping to break the trend with some reliable defense for the second half. Out of the gates, things were neck and neck. Both teams battled for the lead, but once the Eagles took the lead with 12:36 in the second half, they wouldn’t look back.  Lipscomb tried to hold on, closing the lead back to three with six minutes remaining in the contest, but then with back-to-back 3’s from FGCU, the game became out of reach for the Bisons. The Bisons had no answer for the 47 point explosion in the second half from FGCU,...
Lipscomb Security officer Maurice Conner dies after brief battle with COVID-19

Lipscomb Security officer Maurice Conner dies after brief battle with COVID-19

“It is with great sadness that I share the news of another loss in the Lipscomb family,” read an email from President Randy Lowry sent out to the Lipscomb community on Thursday afternoon. President Lowry went on to explain that the Lipscomb Security veteran and minister at the 19th Avenue Church of Christ in Springfield, Tennessee, Maurice J. Conner, had died of COVID-19, marking the third loss in the Lipscomb community in the past six weeks. Maurice Conner started at Lipscomb as a student and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1981. Shortly after graduating, he joined Lipscomb’s security team in 1983 and while serving the security team also earned his Master of Arts in Bible in 2000. Dr. Lowry shared how respected and loved Conner was among the Lipscomb community due to the “wisdom, compassion, and joyful nature,” that Conner brought to his job every day. “The deep and profound respect and love the security team has for Maurice was obvious as they relayed stories about shared work experiences, his humorous radio calls to dispatch to report on weather conditions during the third shift and their lively conversations about faith, theology and life,” said Lowry “In addition to being a dedicated security officer, Maurice was also a minister and mentor to his colleagues through the years.” In addition to the kind sentiments Dr. Lowry shared in his message, members of the Lipscomb Security team also expressed their admiration for Conner. “He was definitely gentle, caring, and very devout. He had clearly done a lot of his own thinking so any religious conversation you might have he...
President Joe Biden’s inaugural address focuses on unity after era of discord

President Joe Biden’s inaugural address focuses on unity after era of discord

President Joe Biden looked toward a future of unity as well as to the problems he inherited when he took the oath of office at high noon D.C. time Wednesday. “This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge,” the newly inaugurated president said in his address that was greeted with enthusiasm around the world and at Lipscomb, where a socially distant viewing party took place. “…Unity is the path forward. And we must meet this moment as the United States of America. If we do that, I guarantee you we will not fail,” said the 46th president of the United States. The inauguration was historically important in many ways, including the fact that Biden’s Vice President Kamala Harris is the first female to hold that office. She also is the first Black and Indian-American vice president. This inauguration held special significance for many reasons including a raging pandemic (U.S. COVID deaths surpassed 400,000 in the day prior), a fortressed Capitol and the notable absence of former President Donald Trump, who broke with the nation’s symbolic peaceful transition — a shining light to the world — by flying to Mar-A-Lago, his exclusive Palm Beach resort rather than attending the ceremony. Former presidents George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton and their spouses attended the inauguration as well as joined Biden and Harris for a wreath-laying at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. The only other living President Jimmy Carter, 96, could not attend the ceremonies because of his age, but Biden took note of Carter and his support. Carter, who took office in 1977, expressed his regrets...
Dr. Orpheus Heyward speaks on good samaritan and social injustice for MLK Day Gathering

Dr. Orpheus Heyward speaks on good samaritan and social injustice for MLK Day Gathering

Today at the Lipscomb University virtual gathering Dr. Orpheus Heyward spoke. The university used the chapel to honor the life of Dr. Martin Luther King and the importance of his work. This year, 3 students offered up three of Dr. Martin Luther King’s prayers.  Amara Ukazim read ”Help us rise up out of our egotism.” Dorie Harrison read a prayer for uncertain times, “Love even our enemy neighbors.” Donovan Ross read, “We are made for the high places.” “In a climate like today, we need a balanced voice like Martin Luther King Jr,” said Dr. Orpheus Heyward. Dr. Heyward discussed how the world is facing much social injustice today and how the “heart of a racist can only be addressed for the perspective of God.”  Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. did a sermon out of luke chapter 10, verse 25, and following on the good samaritan. This was the parable that Dr. Heyward taught out of the chapel.  “Jesus moved the conversation from who is my neighbor to what is a neighbor in the bible.” In the parable, God used a Samaritan as the hero of the story. Dr. Heyward related the samaritan to how we should act as well. Dr. Heyward answers the question of who should be treated as a neighbor by stating,“Anyone who’s in crisis” is who needs help from a neighbor.  “We need people to behave as neighbors,” said Dr. Heyward,” Love as God loves.” Colleges such as Belmont, Fisk, Lipscomb, Meharry, Nashville State, Tennessee State University, Trevecca and Vanderbilt, as well as other area colleges and universities are honoring the life and legacy of...
Lipscomb security asks students to ‘stay safe’ as fears of inauguration unrest loom near

Lipscomb security asks students to ‘stay safe’ as fears of inauguration unrest loom near

After last week’s deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol, Nashville police and Lipscomb Security are remaining vigilant for planned armed protests at Nashville’s Legislative Plaza. The Federal Bureau of Investigations warned of protests in all 50 state capitols from January 16 through at least January 20. “Recent news stories have pointed to the potential for rallies surrounding the day of the inauguration, with Nashville being one of the places mentioned. There is no reason for alarm, but there is reason to be aware, as we have seen many rallies take negative turns over the last year,” said Lipscomb Security Executive Director Kyle Dickerson in an email to the student body Friday. “If you find yourself needing to move about the city, we always encourage you to remain aware of your surroundings, travel with a friend or in groups when possible, and keep your cell phone charged and with you.” Metro Police made the Metro Council aware of the specifically planned protests, in a memo shared via Twitter by Council Member Bob Mendes. The first potential protest, planned to occur Sunday, is called the “Tennessee Freedom Event”. In the memo, Police Chief John Drake shares this event is connected to a call for rallies at every state capitol in the country. Another planned protest is set to happen on Inauguration Day [Jan. 20], for what police describe as a “pro-Trump rally.” <blockquote class=”twitter-tweet”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>INBOX: Letter from Chief Drake to Metro Council about potential protests at the State Capitol. <br><br>Summary – no indication of imminent threat of violence, but MNPD will be monitoring. <a href=”https://t.co/sIqQ2eORJ3“>pic.twitter.com/sIqQ2eORJ3</a></p>&mdash; Bob Mendes (@mendesbob) <a href=”https://twitter.com/mendesbob/status/1348766412588908546?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw“>January 11, 2021</a></blockquote> <script async...
Students required to test negative before returning to campus

Students required to test negative before returning to campus

Although Davidson County’s COVID-19 policies don’t look that much different from when students left campus last November, Lipscomb’s plan for this semester has a few significant changes.  The first major change for students this semester will be the required testing for students. Lipscomb revealed this plan to students via email on Dec. 18 from the Incident Management Team of Lipscomb.  “I’ve really enjoyed hearing that everybody had to be tested to come back to campus. I felt like it left no discrepancy. It kind of puts everyone on a level playing field of being healthy and getting to start the semester off on a better note,” Freshman, Madison Schomer. “I think it’s great that they’re being so cautious. I’m a nursing student so I get to see what covid looks like first hand and I’m proud to go to a school that takes it so seriously. I’m ready to be back to normal and by being so cautious, we will be back to normal life faster. I think the testing before coming back requirement is crucial in avoiding people bringing it to campus,” said Junior Nursing Major Kaelyn Miller. Below we’ve answered some questions that students might be wondering.  What if I already had COVID?  If you tested positive for COVID-19 within the last three months (or on or after Oct. 18) you don’t have to get retested. You can instead upload your positive test results to Med Proctor.  What if I’m a commuter student?  You still must get tested to come on campus as a commuter student. For testing, locations click here.  “Sure it was annoying to have...