Lowry reflects on time as president before stepping aside on Monday

Lowry reflects on time as president before stepping aside on Monday

President Randy Lowry doesn’t exactly remember his first day at Lipscomb. He does remember sitting in his office for the first week or two and not thinking there was much to be done.  Now, 16 years later, as he prepares to end his time as Lipscomb’s president, he no longer has to wonder, “What am I supposed to be doing?”  “Eventually, we figured that out and the pace picked up,” Lowry told Lumination Network. “Once the pace picked up, it hasn’t paused since then.” Lowry said there were a lot of emotions he associated with his coming to Lipscomb, including hopefulness for what he could accomplish.  “This Christian college, which is a sister school to Pepperdine where I was coming from, really could and should be the leading university in our church fellowship,” said Lowry. “I was filled with anticipation, very excited and complemented to be here.” Now, as Lowry steps down as president at midnight tonight and assumes the role of chancellor, he says he’s looking forward to taking a break. He added for context that most university presidents only serve six years.  “After 16 years, if we’re being really honest with ourselves, we’re probably more exhausted than we know. And so I’m going to sleep for the first 10 days,” he said with a laugh.   Lowry said that in the next few months he’ll be taking a working sabbatical in which he wants to take piano lessons, which he hasn’t done since high school. He also said he plans on spending a lot of time with his nine grandchildren, all of whom have been born during his...
Bonnaroo 2021 canceled due to heavy rain

Bonnaroo 2021 canceled due to heavy rain

Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival will not take place again this year. The festival announced in an email and via social media that it would be canceling the event in the days leading up to its launch. Instead of being shut down for COVID like in 2020, this year it’s because of heavy rain. Bonnaroo has faced flooding from the rain that is impacting most of the southeast due to Hurricane Ida. In the email, they said, “While this weekend’s weather looks outstanding, currently Centeroo is waterlogged in many areas, the ground is incredibly saturated on our tollbooth paths, and the campgrounds are flooded to the point that we are unable to drive in or park vehicles safely.” This past day in Middle Tennessee has been raining nonstop, contributing to the flooding that has led them to deem the grounds unfit for concerts this year. The event was supposed to take place this upcoming weekend. Those with tickets will receive a refund within 30 days. Their message ended with the hope that Bonnaroo will return next summer. “WE WILL SEE YOU ON THE FARM IN JUNE...
As Nashville grows, homeless communities are getting neglected; nonprofits offer aid

As Nashville grows, homeless communities are getting neglected; nonprofits offer aid

When it comes to a growing urban community such as Nashville, one of the main concerns, in the eyes of the government, is where people are going to live.  As more and more people move to the city, Metro is eager to increase housing available for those who are able and willing to pay for it. However, those in the lowest income brackets are left behind more often than not.  As a result, many homeless people’s lives are being disrupted. Some people, such as Cecelie Eiler, are now doing work to combat this.  “[Nashville has] got all these people moving here,” said Eiler, a recent Lipscomb graduate who now works with these homeless populations. “We want to put up the nicest things for the nicest people and what that means is…the people at the bottom just keep getting shoved to the side.” With rent prices rising, construction companies are eager to build newer and more housing options and push out those who can not afford the competitive prices, and it’s happening currently in East Nashville’s River Chase Apartments.  Eiler is originally from Freeport, Illinois, and received a degree in environmental and sustainability science at Lipscomb, graduating in May 2021. She now works in the nonprofit sector dedicated to helping the homeless population.   “What’s happening is that there is a set of developers that are buying those apartments and they’re planning to tear them down,” Eiler said. “Currently, there are 60 housing units there that take Section 8.” Section 8 is a government-funded voucher program for low-income houses that allows them to find their own living space. However, the landlord...
Summer heat in Nashville brings dangerously high temperatures

Summer heat in Nashville brings dangerously high temperatures

Summer can be a brutal time for hot temperatures. The past week in Nashville has been especially extreme, which is easily noticeable as soon as one leaves the air conditioning.  A heat advisory was declared for Middle Tennessee for Aug. 11 and Aug. 12. With temperatures in the upper 90s residents were encouraged to stay out of the heat as much as possible. The Nashville Weather Service projects highs to remain in the 90s till Sunday, Aug. 15. Although the southeast has been especially hot, many others across the country have also been affected. According to NBC, almost 200 million people were under a heat advisory as of Aug. 12.  As the rest of the week continues to present these high temperatures, stay hydrated, don’t spend too much time in the heat, and keep an eye on those vulnerable to heat such as senior citizens and...
George Floyd murder by police, other racial injustices, have BSU setting future goals

George Floyd murder by police, other racial injustices, have BSU setting future goals

Sparked by the headlines about the murder of George Floyd as well as other Black men killed by police officers and a growing awareness of racial injustice, Lipscomb’s Black Student Union is among the citizens and organizations that nationwide are putting a fresh spotlight on issues too often ignored. Lipscomb’s BSU President Dorie Harrison said the tumult of the past year has offered her an incentive to reflect upon the past injustices and set goals for the betterment of the future. Last semester, Harrison, a senior marketing major from Nashville and a Lipscomb Lady Bison basketball player, had a unique experience. In her Legal Aspects class, students watched the video of the death of George Floyd and were instructed individually to decide the sentence of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin (the suspect in Floyd’s murder trial).  Harrison said she recalls feeling shocked as several students didn’t seem to see any wrongdoing in Chauvin’s actions: “To see so many of my classmates say that Chauvin was completely innocent and to go back and justify the death of George Floyd. My hands were shaking.”  As a person of color at a school with a historically high population of White students, Harrison said she often feels put on the spot in these types of situations.  “I was the only Black person in the class, so everyone was looking at me like, ‘Oh, what is she gonna say?’” Harrison said.  Harrison said she has seen a lot of groupthink in her classes. She said people seem to fall in with the majority opinion, leaving little room for those with different viewpoints to speak...