SGA to host drive-in movie this Friday 

SGA to host drive-in movie this Friday 

Have you been missing the movies lately? Well good news, there’s going to be a drive-in this Friday (October 16th) at Woodmont Hills Church.  With Regal just announcing the closing of all their in-person theatres until further notice, this event couldn’t come at a better time.   There are five different options for what movie will show on Friday. The choices are “Knives Out”, “Little Women”, “Zootopia”, “Jumanji: The Next Level”, and “Ratatouille”.  Students can find the Google Form to vote for their favorite on the weekly email from the Office of Student Life. The chosen movie will be announced either this Wednesday or Thursday.   There’s only room for the first 100 cars, so be sure to get there early. The lot opens at 7:30 pm and the movie begins at 8 pm. Bring your student ID with you in order to get a spot.  To get to Woodmont Hills Church just turn right onto Woodmont Blvd, drive a little over a mile, and then turn right onto US-31. You’ll see the church on the left after you turn.   Thanks to OID, SAB and SGA, you and your friends can spend your Friday night under the stars with a great movie and no cost. It will be a great event so make sure you check it out.  If you have any more questions you can send an email to studentlife@lipscomb.edu or swing by their office on the first floor of...
Professors speak on challenges of teaching during a pandemic

Professors speak on challenges of teaching during a pandemic

For universities across the country, 2020 has been quite the educational roller coaster. From being uprooted from campuses in March to some finally returning in August equipped with masks and hand sanitizer, college life is looking different for everyone.  Many have seen first hand how this has impacted students, but that introduces the question: What has this been like for teachers? Or in other words, what does the new normal look like for those in charge of educating?  Dr. Paul Prill, the former Honors College director and current professor of Communication, Technology and Society, said, “The new normal for me is very simple—I will never be in a closed space with my class for 50 minutes.”  Prill based his decision on recent studies that showed reduced COVID transmission rates when outdoors versus inside.  Though new guidelines are in place, a lot was still left up to the teachers. “[Lipscomb has] allowed [students] to decide if you want to be in person or virtual”, said Prill. “They’ve allowed [teachers] to decide if we want to be in person or virtual or some hybrid of the two.”  Prill opted for a hybrid of both Zoom and outside in-person classes; his class has been divided into 3 “cohorts” that alternate weeks to meet in person for lectures. Even so, all the students would be giving speeches over Zoom.   If his class was inside, the students would all be required to wear masks at all times. “Then I can’t see your facial expressions,” said Prill. “I could barely notice any difference in your eye contact.”  Many other teachers are opting for the hybrid...
Things to do in Nashville during a pandemic

Things to do in Nashville during a pandemic

Nashville–home of the Grand Ole Opry, country music and the Predators–is a big city that keeps getting bigger, which is great unless there’s a global pandemic that’s currently putting a stop to life as we know it.  According to asafenashville.org, September 1st marked the transition into Phase 2 of the reopening plan for Nashville. While businesses and mask mandates remain relatively unaffected by these most recent changes, restaurants and event venues are now allowed to expand their capacity, provided that social distancing and outdoor availability are followed.  It’s no secret that Nashville has been called out for its lack of attention to these protocols, and downtown Nashville bars have been exposed as doing a particularly poor job. Lucky for you, here’s a short guide of things to do in the huge city of Nashville that won’t get you on the news for being part of the problem.  First things first–the outdoors.  In an article from The New York Times, Lindsey Marr, an engineering professor and aerosol scientist at Virginia Tech, was quoted as saying, “I think outdoors is so much better than indoors in almost all cases.”  So if you’re anxious to get out and want to stay as safe as possible, try a hike. AllTrails.com lists Radnor Lake State Park, Beaman Park and Long Hunter State Park as some of the top hikes in the Nashville area.  Another option is going to Cheekwood, a botanical garden with plenty of flowers to see and activities to do.  However, before you visit any of these parks, just be sure to check each park’s website for closings and information.  Although quarantine allowed for...
President Lowry teaches “Surviving and Thriving in Uncertain Times” class

President Lowry teaches “Surviving and Thriving in Uncertain Times” class

Lipscomb President Randy Lowry said he “was a little bit surprised” by the interest in the summer class “Surviving and Thriving in Uncertain Times.” “We had about 200 students who took the course,” said Lowry about the new class he, with the aid of nine faculty members, taught online to incoming freshmen. Of course, due to the pandemic, the class was offered online and free of charge. The students gathered virtually to listen to the speaker, ask questions, engage in small-group discussions and take part in other activities. Lowry said the course, offered July 6-17, filled a need that he thought must exist. Knowing most of these freshmen have not had classes since around March when schools and universities nationwide shut down due to the pandemic, Lowry correctly predicted that some incoming freshmen might be anxious to get tastes of the Lipscomb educational experience. “I just had an idea that our incoming freshmen … must be bored and must want to get started,” said Lowry. The class was structured so that for the first part of the day students would have two 15- to 20-minute mini-lectures — or, as Lowry described them, “TED Talks” — from either himself or from another one of Lipscomb’s educators. A 15-minute video created by the College of Entertainment & the Arts was inserted into the programming for a change of pace.  After the presentations from the faculty, there would be a live chat that allowed students to ask questions. Lowry described the Q&A sessions as very popular and said there were more than 100 questions. He said the students seemed “to be absolutely...
Lipscomb introduces new protocols to on-campus food service

Lipscomb introduces new protocols to on-campus food service

It’s no secret that college campuses will look different this semester. With safety at top priority, Lipscomb has created some new ways for students to eat on campus.  There have been new dining options, a full-service Chick-fil-A and even a healthy snack bar added to Bennett in preparation for students’ arrival in the fall. “We will be doing some fairly dramatic changing in terms of food service,” said President Randy Lowry in a conversation with Lumination about dining at Lipscomb this fall. Lowry talked about four specific changes that students will notice come August. The first “dramatic change” Lowry noted was the limiting of seating in Bison Cafe to half of its usual capacity, in order to follow social distancing guidelines. To accommodate for this loss of seating, there will now be seating available in two additional spaces: Room 1891 and downstairs in Shamblin.  Not only will there be a reduction in seating, but the serving of the food itself will no longer look the same either.  That’s where the next two major changes come into play. “There will be no self-service in the cafeteria,” Lowry said. “Everything will be served to you.” The Bison Cafe won’t be changing what food is served, just how the food is served. These modifications will limit contact between those in the cafeteria to reduce the spread of germs.  “We will have a very robust grab-and-go kind of concept that will be introduced,” Lowry said.  There will be an area where students can pick up pre-portioned food in addition to a cafeteria-style station. Not only will this be safer for students, but it will...