Lipscomb grieves the passing of student Anthony Kuh

Lipscomb grieves the passing of student Anthony Kuh

 Lipscomb lost a loved member of its community Nov. 9 with the death of Anthony Kuh, a 31-year-old student and Army veteran from Clarksville, Tennessee. He joined the Lipscomb family as an online student last summer.  President Randy Lowry said “[Kuh] completed several deployments and served in the Signal Corps as an imagery analyst.”  Kuh’s passing came as a result of heart attack complications. Lowery shared this information with Lipscomb students in an email on Tuesday.  Sam Lynn and Jimmie Handley, who are in charge of Lipscomb’s Office of Veterans Services both said that Kuh had been looking forward to his future and the work he could do after getting a Lipscomb degree. There have been no finalized plans announced for Kuh’s remembrance yet, but Lowry assured that the plans will be communicated to students when they’re arranged.  “Anthony is survived by his wife, Colleen, and their four young children, among other family and friends,” said Lowry.  “Please join me in praying for Anthony’s family, his classmates, his friends and everyone who loved him,” said Lowry. (Know that you don’t have to go through grief alone, and if you are in need of grief counseling, you can reach out to the University Counseling...
COVID-19 won’t stop Lipscomb’s Veterans Day celebrations

COVID-19 won’t stop Lipscomb’s Veterans Day celebrations

COVID caused the city of Nashville to cancel this year’s Veterans Day parade, but that didn’t stop Lipscomb University from shining the light on the contributions of veterans. “Personally, I do not think the lack of a parade will have a large impact on Veterans Day,” said Andrew Santander, president of Campus Veterans Organization. “Veterans Day serves a much larger purpose than the need to be celebrated with a parade. I served because of a larger purpose, for my brothers and sisters to my left and right.” Veterans Day at Lipscomb University is going to look a little different but keep its usual spirit. Lipscomb’s Veteran Services will continue to hold events so that veterans and nonveterans alike can remember those who have served. There will be American flags set up around the center of campus and yellow ribbons tied around some of the trees of campus. If you want to tie a ribbon to honor a veteran, you can pick one that has been cut to the appropriate length at the campus Starbucks. Additionally, there will be coupons for veterans for a free meal that can be used throughout this week. It qualifies veterans for breakfast, lunch or dinner in the upstairs cafeteria of the Student Center. The coupons will be available at the Veteran Services office. Most people today know the celebration as Veterans Day, but that’s not what it always has been. The holiday was originally called Armistice Day and began as a reminder to honor those who served in World War I. The Armistice, ending the First World War was signed November 11, 1918. The...
TRAFFIC UPDATE: Campus access points to be streamlined due to upcoming debate

TRAFFIC UPDATE: Campus access points to be streamlined due to upcoming debate

Wednesday afternoon, campus security released plans to help with traffic flow ahead of Thursday’s presidential debate at Belmont University. Beginning at 2 p.m. the campus will begin the transition into a three-way entry/exit. The three access and exit points for the campus will be University Park Drive off of Belmont Boulevard, the Steam plant entrance off of Granny White Pike and Ferndale Drive by Lipscomb University Health Services. Starting at 5 p.m., students will need their ID to get into these entrances. Lipscomb security also advised students to remain aware of certain points of portions of I-65, I-40, and I-440 becoming closed ahead of the debate, saying “We encourage you to plan ahead and seek alternative routes home to prevent being stuck in a difficult traffic situation during the afternoon.” These changes are being made in preparation for security concerns, while such a high-profile event takes place so close to campus. Demonstrations are scheduled to take place in front of Belmont by “Be Better Belmont”, a group aiming to call out the university for ignoring black and brown communities by holding a debate with president trump, whom they say refused to condemn white supremacist at the first presidential debate. On security concerns, Lipscomb security said in their email to students “while we don’t anticipate any issues, we always want to be prepared because the safety and security of the Lipscomb community is our top priority.” Photo Courtesy of Lipscomb...
Road and business closures begin as partially muted final presidential debate launches Belmont invasion

Road and business closures begin as partially muted final presidential debate launches Belmont invasion

The final meetup of 2020 presidential candidates Donald Trump and Joe Biden is scheduled to take place Thursday, Oct. 22 up the boulevard at Belmont University. After an uncertain few weeks since President Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis and the cancellation of the second debate, Belmont is moving full speed ahead with debate plans. But those plans have sparked another controversy after officials announced microphones will be muted during portions so that candidates are able to make their points. President Trump has said he is displeased with this new rule sprung by his behavior at the first debate. Meanwhile, Belmont University has called for numerous area road and business closures, the majority of which will go into effect Wednesday. Belmont Boulevard from Portland Avenue to Bernard Avenue, is currently closed till Friday.  Belmont Boulevard from 18th Avenue South to Delmar Avenue will close Wednesday at noon. Acklen Avenue from 17th Avenue South to 18th Avenue South closes at noon Wednesday. Acklen Avenue from 14th Avenue South to 15th Avenue South, closes 6 p.m. Wednesday. Delmar Avenue from 15th Avenue South to Belmont Boulevard, closes 6 p.m. Wednesday. Compton Avenue from 15th Avenue South to Belmont Boulevard, closes noon Wednesday. Caldwell Avenue from 15th Avenue South to 12th Avenue South closes 6 p.m. Wednesday. The excitement of a presidential debate is not felt by at least one Belmont-area business that already has been hit by COVID-19-forced closures during the pandemic shutdown. In an Instagram post to their more than 16,000 followers, local business Proper Bagel expressed frustration toward the road closures. View this post on Instagram 🚨 please read 🚨  thanks to the presidential debate taking place directly across...
Virtual learning instead of hands-on experience offers new challenges for nursing students

Virtual learning instead of hands-on experience offers new challenges for nursing students

Lipscomb’s nursing program, always reliant on physical interaction and hands-on experiences in the past, had to adapt dramatically when the school switched to virtual learning. The pandemic that mandated virtual learning also caused problems in terms of the opportunities for nursing students. “Many clinical partners, around the same time Lipscomb decided to switch to virtual learning, also decided to no longer let students into their facilities,” said Dr. Chelsia Harris, the program’s executive director. “The rationale was to conserve their personal protection equipment, or PPE’s, for essential workers that absolutely needed them.” “It was challenging for me to finish online in the spring, seeing a lot of cool things in my clinicals (at Vanderbilt Trauma Unit), but was only able to go twice before everything started shutting down,” said McKenzie Allen, a senior. Despite many clinical partners and direct physical interaction being cut off, the nursing program made successful adaptations, according to Harris. “We have such incredible faculty and staff that worked really hard to work with some of the vendors in a virtual capacity, and were able to launch a high-fidelity type virtual simulation,” she said. “Some of the simulations are so realistic, and actually have students think more critically than what you thought you would even imagine comparatively to bedside with a real patient.” “The Tennessee State Board of Nursing as well as our national accreditation body were in full support of the utilization of virtual simulations as long as students were able to meet outcomes,” Harris said. The sudden shift to isolation for students and faculty did cause adjustment, according to Harris. “It was gut-wrenching to...
Killings of Floyd, two other black citizens ‘inexcusable’ says Lipscomb president

Killings of Floyd, two other black citizens ‘inexcusable’ says Lipscomb president

The killings of three black Americans — including the recent slaying of George Floyd, killed by a white Minneapolis police officer who kept his knee on his neck for almost nine minutes, until he was dead — are “tragic and inexcusable,” said Lipscomb President Randy Lowry. Lowry addressed the Floyd case — the officer has been charged with murder and more charges are expected against the other three officers on the scene —  and the other two deadly racist incidents in an email to the Lipscomb community. The killing of Floyd has led to demonstrations and rioting across the nation, including in Nashville, where a peaceful rally on Saturday was overshadowed by mob violence and arson of the Metro Courthouse and looting on Lower Broadway.  Downtown businesses continue on alert in case other incidents flare-up. “I write to you this Monday evening with a sense of deep sadness as we respond to the tragic and inexcusable deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor,” Lowry said. “It follows recent similar instances when the lives of black Americans have been wrongfully taken revealing continuing injustice and inequality in our nation. The Lipscomb community stands clearly on the side of respect and love. We are completely intolerant of racial abuse and injustices for all. “The Lipscomb community stands clearly on the side of respect and love,” he said. “We are completely intolerant of racial abuse and injustices for all.” The death of Floyd came on the heels of two highly publicized killings of black people by authority figures. Taylor, 26, an emergency room technician in Louisville, Kentucky, was shot at...