Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Professor traveling in France offers perspective on Nice attack, advice to study-abroad students

Professor traveling in France offers perspective on Nice attack, advice to study-abroad students

‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR

NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR


Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

Modern-day technology comes to life in Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman’s thriller Nerve. High school senior Vee Delmonico (Emma Roberts) is tired of living in the shadow of her best friend Sydney (Emily Meade). However, this all changes when Sydney introduces Vee to Nerve, an online reality game similar to truth or dare. Nerve is divided into two categories: watchers and players. Players are dared by the watchers to perform and film embarrassing or dangerous tasks. The only way out for the players is to succeed, bail or fail. Vee decides to try Nerve and is immediately dared to kiss a stranger. This dare leads her into an exciting partnership with fearless veteran player Ian (Dave Franco). Vee and Ian’s partnership quickly becomes popular among the watchers, but as their popularity increases, their dares only become harder. Soon, Vee and Ian find themselves in the top 10 of all Nerve players, thanks to a series of difficult dares, but it all quickly becomes too much for Vee. Freaked out by the intensity of the game, she reports the game to a police officer — going against the only rule Nerve enforces. Vee is now seen as a “snitch” to the watchers, and she is deemed a prisoner while all the money is taken out of her family’s bank account. The only way to win back her money and freedom is to win the entire game. Once she learns that Ian, too, is a prisoner, Vee sets out to win Nerve, but it may not be in the way the watchers expect. I am usually not a fan of thrillers...
‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

The controversy and backlash surrounding the female “Ghostbusters” reboot has been in the air since the first trailer dropped in March. After months of angry comments, extreme dislikes and waiting, we finally have the answer to the question, “Is the film actually any good?” In my opinion, yes. I actually think it improves on the original. Physicist Erin Gilbert (Kristen Wiig) reunites with childhood friend Abby Yates (Melissa McCarthy), and they team up with Jillian Holtzmann (Kate McKinnon) and Patty Tolan (Leslie Jones) to investigate paranormal activity in New York City. Of course, many doubters and the mayor of the city are against them, until a large device that amplifies the paranormal unleashes an apocalypse of ghosts. As a huge fan of all four of the leading ladies, I was hyped about this movie since it was announced, and I was not disappointed. While certainly paying homage to the original with its many Easter eggs and cameos, “Ghostbusters” was able to stand on its own as a film with its own unique plot and characters. While Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig and Leslie Jones were all fantastic, Kate McKinnon absolutely stole the show with her quirky, adorable, mad scientist characteristics. Almost everything she did was laugh-out-loud funny. I laughed out loud throughout most of the film, whereas I only chuckled a few times watching the original “Ghostbusters.” The secretary character was much more interesting in this version, and there were more ghosts to bust. Best of all, the bonds between the characters were much stronger. These ladies (and Chris Hemsworth) just work so well together, and it’s nice to see...
Graduate discusses New York City career, short film appearing at Cannes Film Festival

Graduate discusses New York City career, short film appearing at Cannes Film Festival

2013 Journalism and New Media graduate Brynn Elliot Watkins is a lady with many hats. After graduating from Lipscomb, Watkins moved from Music City to pursue a fashion career in the Big Apple. She now is doing wardrobe styling for films and editorials, as well as running her lifestyle site, Being Elliott. She also is doing fashion consulting for brands, interior design projects and personal styling. “There’s never a dull moment,” Watkins noted. In addition to her fashion and lifestyle career, Watkins also does some film work “on the side.” Watkins recently collaborated with her husband, Aaron Craig, a filmmaker by trade, who started We Are Films. On a whim, the couple decided to submit their film that they shot on her family farm for inclusion in the Cannes Film Festival — and they got in. Watkins said finding out that they were going to be attending Cannes was an awesome and surreal experience. “We were thrilled for sure,” Watkins said. “Cannes has always been a dream, and we are so glad we were able to attend. God provided the opportunity, and I was thankful for that!” The short film is titled “Speak of the Lights. The story line centers on “a young boy who goes missing after a mysterious light appears. The town bands together to find out what happened.” “It was a very small cast and crew, but we all had an awesome time working together,” Watkins said. Watkins said she and Craig had always wanted to collaborate as a couple and thought this was a great opportunity for both of them. “We both did a little...
‘The Secret Life of Pets’ is tail-wagging good time

‘The Secret Life of Pets’ is tail-wagging good time

Some might think Katie should have let sleeping dogs lie (. . . or in her case, one sleeping dog lie). Max (Louis C.K.) and Katie (Ellie Kemper) are best friends. Katie got Max when he was just a puppy, so they’ve been together almost all of Max’s life. Max dutifully waits for her to come home from work every day, and she always greets him with a big hug when she comes home before they eat dinner and stare off into the scenic, brightly-lit New York City skyline together. One day, though, Katie messes up the idyllic life they have; she brings home, to their small New York apartment, a “brother” for Max — Duke (Eric Stonestreet), a gigantic mutt from the shelter who doesn’t have a family. Max, of course, doesn’t take to this new family member well. Viewers can see Max’s perspective; Duke is a “threat,” taking over Max’s life — eating his food and sleeping in his bed.  On the other hand, Duke was eager to join a new family and is just getting accustomed to his new life. Eventually, the two new brothers get lost in NYC together and meet up with Snowball (Kevin Hart), a bunny with a posse of misfit pets trying to lead a revolution against mankind. There’s a host of likable characters, including Max’s friends — Chloe, (the cat who could not care less, voiced by Lake Bell), Tiberius (the hawk who’s just learning how to make friends rather than eat them, voiced by Albert Brooks — aka Marlin in Finding Nemo), and Gidget (the soap-opera-watching, crazy-in-love French pup leading the rescue mission, voiced...
Alan and Lisa Robertson talk ‘Duck Dynasty,’ marriage, ‘A New Season’

Alan and Lisa Robertson talk ‘Duck Dynasty,’ marriage, ‘A New Season’

Alan Robertson, the “beardless brother” of the Duck Dynasty clan, and his wife Lisa recently sat down with Lumination to discuss faith, family, Duck Dynasty and their newest book, A New Season. The Robertsons were on campus to speak at Lipscomb’s Summer Celebration. A&E’s Duck Dynasty aired its first episode on March 21, 2012. The show has since broadcast 101 episodes over nine seasons, and it holds the record for cable’s most-watched nonfiction telecast for the Season 4 premiere. On August 14, 2013, the Season 4 premiere drew a total of 11.8 million viewers. Lumination: What’s your latest book, A New Season, about? Lisa: It’s about our family; It’s about us when we were growing up, and the things that shaped us — the mistakes that we’ve made — both in our life and our marriage. It’s also about what God can do when you completely turn your life over to Him and allow Him to reshape you and redirect your path. It’s really about love, forgiveness and redemption. It’s a great book! Everyone should read it. Alan: There’s a teaching aspect to it as well — “Here’s what God taught us to help you in your relationships.” It’s a little bit of a teaching book as well as a book just about our lives. Lumination: What’s the biggest lesson a college student could learn from your book? Alan: The best thing about our book is that it teaches you what not to do. If you take a college kid or a young person that’s entering into marriage — if they can learn some things about what not to do or...
X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

As Coach Carpenter, one of my main responsibilities is “coaching up” the freshman players. The first day we were on the field with them, Coach Webb huddled up the skill players and asked, “Who here is a quarterback?” No one raised their hand. He kind of snickered to himself and said, “All right, well, who here would call themselves a quarterback.” Finally two guys raised their hands. Ian and Josh. In eighth grade the year before, Josh was the starting quarterback and Ian was the backup. Coach Winfree and I went through fundamentals with them — quick catch and throw, three step drops, basic follow throughs on release and how to grip the ball — basic things just to get those kids warmed up. After so much fundamental work, we went to work with the wide receiver groups. We had them throw slants, hitches and seams — simple routes that will be incorporated in their growth. Holy cow were we impressed with them. They were young with a lot of talent, but Coach Winfree called them “coachable.” I thought that was the perfect way to describe them. The act of being coachable is very important. If you aren’t coachable we can’t help you. Coachability is the willingness to be corrected and to act on that correction. It’s humility. It’s being able to realize that you need the guidance of others to be better. In a way, I have had to be coachable the past two months as well — primarily because of how raw of a coach I am. I’ve sat to the side watching these coaches coach up...
Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Lipscomb’s Madi Talbert came up just short in the Olympic Trials for the 300m steeplechase on Monday, July 4th. Talbert was named as one of the 35 best runners in the country and competed for a spot in the 2016 Summer Olympics, which will be held in Rio de Janeiro. Talbert qualified for the trials by running a personal best 9:50.57 in the 2015 NCAA Division I East Region Prelims, which was the fourth best time in the nation from the East Region and West Region Prelims combined. At the Olympic Trials, she came in 29th with a time of 10:09.76. The top 14 qualified for the Olympic games. “It’s been a crazy experience!” Talbert said. Just a few weeks prior, Talbert competed in Eugene, Oregon, during the National Championship rounds where she qualified for the Olympic Trials shortly after, therefore she had little time to prepare and rest. “I’ve run all the races that I want to run,” Talbert said. “Pros and collegiate athletes have very different schedules, so it was very hard to be racing at that level as a collegiate athlete at the end of my season,” she noted. “By then, you’ve been racing for months and months and months, while professionals have been racing for only a few months. So I was at my peak physically, and it was very hard to maintain my endurance. It was kind of overwhelming.” Nevertheless, Talbert added that competing in the Olympic Trials was an incredible opportunity. “The Olympic Trials was a completely amazing experience. I was envious of the high school athletes because they hadn’t had nationals yet,...
NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR

NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR

Lipscomb athletics continues to succeed off the field as well as on the field. Men’s & women’s golf and softball both received the NCAA Public Recognition award for accomplishments in the classroom this past week. This award comes a season after Kristin Ryman’s softball squad was named National Champions in the classroom for their cumulative GPA (3.65) by the National Fast Pitch Association. Lipscomb Softball’s All-American second baseman (2014-2016) Baylee Williams just completed her collegiate career. Williams was part of the National Championship team for GPA and acknowledges how important her time in the classroom was. “Academics to an athlete is very important because sports are temporary and academics is what is ultimately going to determine how life is after college,” Williams said. “It’s important to have a good balance between the two, but academic focus will get you further in life.” The three teams were honored for finishing in the top 10 percent in the Academic Progress Rate (APR) in their sports during the 2014-15 academic year. All three teams posted scores of 1,000. “”We are very proud of our golf and softball athletes who continue to excel academically, as well as on the field or course,” Dr. Lin Garner, associate athletics director for academics and senior woman administrator, said in a statement.  “Kudos also to their coaches who invest so much time in and attention to academics.” The APR is meant to hold NCAA institutions accountable for their academic progress and graduation, which has become a major focal point in recruiting. Teams must earn an APR of 930 to compete in Championships. Visit the NCAA APR’s website for a...
X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: my coaching philosophy

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: my coaching philosophy

A few years ago, my buddy Anse Rigby made me a pallet guitar that now sits by my fireplace. On the back he wrote: “Pat, continue to praise the Lord with your incredible talent! You rock.” – Anse. Thanks, Anse, you rock, too. Underneath, he wrote a proverb that I had never heard of before. It was Proverbs 27:17. It reads, “As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.” I have been Coach Carpenter or Coach Pat, depending on who you talk to, for about a month now at Franklin High School. When I first got the idea about wanting to coach, my professor at Mississippi State in 2013 told me that I needed to develop a coaching philosophy. My philosophy, I thought, was simple: I want to run a vertical passing attack benefiting from play action off a strong power run game.  Simple, right? Well. After being around the coaches and players at Franklin High School for the past month, I have decided this. I want to have two philosophies. The aforementioned philosophy is my X and O plan, but I decided that I needed a coaching philosophy with the players and, mostly, with myself. That philosophy can be summed up into a few words: Proverbs 27:17. One thing I think our society has forgotten is how to build people up. When people fail, we laugh. We mock them. We make memes with Michael Jordan crying on their face. We don’t challenge others to be better. Instead, we are so involved with ourselves that we aren’t coachable ourselves. This morning, one of the coaches said something  that was simple, yet...
X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: first steps

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: first steps

Sometimes all you need is an opportunity. Sometimes all you need is a chance. And sometimes your first opportunity comes from chance. My name is Patrick Carpenter, and I have been a musician for over 10 years now. I love music. It’s been in every major aspect of my life. Luckily, God not only gave me the gift of music, but He also made me a nerd as well. The primary subject I “nerd out” about outside of music is football, especially the quarterback position. Being from Mississippi, my football hero was the largest football icon there was, who also happened to be from my state — Brett Favre. The way that Favre played as an athlete spoke to me as a musician. Favre improvised; he had fun; he loved every moment and was not afraid to make mistakes. As a guitar player, I had the same mindset when it came to how I approached the instrument. This past spring, I had an idea. I knew I only had a few hours left to complete my undergrad degree, so I was looking for something to “fill” my time during the summer. In the back of my head, I kept hearing many of my instructors in my academic department saying, “Never be afraid to tackle what you fear the most. Take chances.” At some point, I got the idea to be a coach. I have studied football relentlessly and have been in several leadership positions. In my head, I knew I was more than prepared to be a coach. I knew I had the tools, but was it something that...
IMPACT 2016 photo gallery

IMPACT 2016 photo gallery

The Christ-centered youth camp Impact kicked off last week, celebrating its 25th consecutive year on campus with teens, counselors and adults worshiping God. Impact has two programs — Impact Junior, for grades 6-8, and Impact Senior, for grades 9-12. The Junior Camp is a weekend program and was held June 17th-20th. The Senior Camp is a week-long program and was held June 20th-25th. Senior Campus Minister Steve Davidson started the program after prayer and a lot of work nearly 30 years ago. Impact started in 1992 with 250 campers, counselors, and adults coming together to worship God. Impact 2016 had almost 3,100 students on campus....
June Advance ‘Nocturnal Madness’ photo gallery

June Advance ‘Nocturnal Madness’ photo gallery

June Advance — two days led by the Quest leaders for incoming freshman to register for classes, make new friends, meet with their academic department and explore the campus they’ll soon call home — kicked off on Thursday and ran through Friday morning. One of the students’ favorite activities is “Nocturnal Madness,” which is a little over an hour of time on Thursday night to relax, have “more fun than you can imagine” and get to know fellow students better....
Christian Scholars Conference: ‘Tokens’ show photo gallery

Christian Scholars Conference: ‘Tokens’ show photo gallery

Featuring a theme on justice, the Christian Scholars Conference kicked off this week, showcasing a “Tokens” show: “A Change Is Gonna Come,” led by host (and Lipscomb theology and ethics professor) Lee Camp on Thursday night in Collins Alumni Auditorium. Throughout the show, Camp said they will be “looking for tokens of a world characterized by a rightful justice.” The live performance featured special guests, music, discussion, skits, poetry and more. Another live “Tokens” show will be held Sunday, November 20, 2016 at Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium....
Lipscomb-HCA/TriStar Health Care Academy, J-Camp photo gallery

Lipscomb-HCA/TriStar Health Care Academy, J-Camp photo gallery

Campers received hands-on medical experience this week at this year’s Lipscomb-HCA/TriStar Health Care Academy. The academy drew 26 high-schoolers from across Tennessee — and even one from Honduras. The academy’s activities included first-aid training and even a live simulation, featuring Journalism Campers as “victims.” On Tuesday, an Air Evac helicopter landed on the quad. Photos by Lauren Borders, Jason DeBord and Ellie...
Spark Program announcement photo gallery

Spark Program announcement photo gallery

Lipscomb’s latest endeavor seeks to build a partnership with Metro and to spark new leaders with a desire to serve in the downtown Nashville community. President Randolph Lowry announced the program, the off-campus Spark center in downtown Nashville, Tuesday morning on the SunTrust Plaza. Located at the corner of 4th and Commerce, the new Downtown Spark will open in January or February...

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