Men’s basketball releases 2021-22 slate

Men’s basketball releases 2021-22 slate

Volleyball blanks Bruins in one-sided Battle of the Boulevard

Volleyball blanks Bruins in one-sided Battle of the Boulevard

Men’s soccer earns third straight national ranking

Men’s soccer earns third straight national ranking

9/11
Gallery: Campus community memorializes 9/11

Gallery: Campus community memorializes 9/11

Bisons, Bucs play to Sunday afternoon stalemate

Bisons, Bucs play to Sunday afternoon stalemate

Freshman Lip Sync
Freshmen Lipsync Battle celebrates new students and the songs from their childhood

Freshmen Lipsync Battle celebrates new students and the songs from their childhood


20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

“A plane just hit one of the World Trade Center Towers.” R. Samuel Lynn, Lipscomb veterans advocate and a former Marine, recalls hearing those words from his desk at an architectural firm in upstate New York on Sept. 11, 2001. He immediately thought that a small plane must have mistakenly gone off course. “It seemed like just a couple of minutes later [that the secretary] … slow-walked into the office,” Sam Lynn said. “[Her] face was just white. She said, ‘Another plane just hit one of the towers.'” “And that’s when … my heart hit my toes.” Lynn and his colleagues watched the news channel all day, as most Americans did, and realized that they were witnessing a terrorist attack against the United States. The event would alter the trajectory of America and the world– they knew “it was all going to change.” Lynn was right about the changes, which included the creation of The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the United State’s engagement in war in the Middle East. The attack was the impetus for 20 years of consequences. Four years after 9/11, Lynn became a Marine. He spent 10 years in the military and completed two tours of duty in the Middle East with Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was injured during his service. After rehabilitation, he became a combat marksmanship instructor. Today, he serves the Lipscomb University Community as director of Veterans Services. Lynn’s has a multi-level view on the events, since he experienced the events of 9/11 as a civilian and then participated in the war that followed as a Marine. Veteran Programs Coordinator Jimmie L....
McQueen addresses students during first Gathering as president

McQueen addresses students during first Gathering as president

On her first day as Lipscomb University’s 18th president, Dr. Candice McQueen made several announcements during Tuesday’s Gathering. After introductions from SGA President Grant Hitchcock and her daughter, freshman Abigail McQueen, Dr. McQueen made her entrance on the podium. McQueen, greeted by a warm round of applause from the audience, cited the students as the primary reason for accepting this leadership position. “Lipscomb University exists for students,” said McQueen. “And we will empower our community, our administrators to make sure students are job one, and we will live out the visions of our founders to help you, our students, to be equipped to fully integrate with your academic passions and careers. McQueen made a few special announcements, such as the start of the President’s Student Advisory Council, otherwise known as PSAC. PSAC will allow McQueen to directly hear feedback from students through a collaborative effort with the SGA. Nominations for council members are ongoing, with the council set to be announced toward the end of September. To make up for the sophomore class’ lost opportunities, McQueen revealed that next week will be sophomore week. At the start of the week, sophomores will receive a gift package filled with an assortment of treats as well as tickets to events that lead up to an exclusive silent disco party. McQueen addressed and confirmed that the recent dining staff shortages and restaurant closures were due to a COVID outbreak. To make up for the inconvenience, students were treated to a cookout of hamburgers and hot dogs as an appreciation for their patience and willingness to cooperate with the staff shortages. Finally, McQueen recognized...
Labor Day: The history behind our day off

Labor Day: The history behind our day off

Every year, students of all ages look forward to the first Monday of September, whether that holds an end-of-summer get together or a break from an already busy school year. But where exactly did Labor Day come from, and why is it a significant holiday in the history of America? The story of Labor Day starts with the labor movements of the late 19th century. Conditions for American workers at the time were notoriously bad. Twelve-hour workdays and unsanitary factories made their jobs dangerous, and benefits (such as health care) were either severely limited or non-existent. There were also no laws protecting child workers, who were often subjected to particularly unsafe jobs, like getting into and cleaning out chimneys, because of their small size.  To protest their unfair treatment, labor unions across the country organized strikes, some of which were more violent than others. In the infamous Pullman strike of 1894, the American Railroad Union led a nationwide boycott of Pullman Palace train cars to protest wage cuts. The strike ended only when the government sent troops to Chicago, which triggered a series of deadly riots. Such shocking events caused many writers, photographers, activists, and politicians to turn their focus to exposing the horrors of factories, helping workers fight for their rights, and pushing for legislators to make serious changes. As greater awareness of the plight of workers began to spread, many advocated for a holiday to celebrate American workers and their contributions to society. In 1887, Oregon became the first state to recognize Labor Day as an official holiday, and four other states (Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and...
Lipscomb extends mask mandate to Sept. 17

Lipscomb extends mask mandate to Sept. 17

The Lipscomb community will remain under an indoor mask mandate till at least September 17. The extension was updated on the university’s website on the first of the month and follows a recent surge in campus COVID cases. “As we are preparing for a strong start to the year, the COVID-19 Delta variant continues to spread and has proven to be markedly more transmissible than earlier strains of the virus,” said the university on its site. “Because of the increasing presence of the Delta variant, we have implemented a few policies and procedures to help mitigate the spread of the virus within our community. These are similar to the policies at peer institutions and other businesses in this region and across the nation.” The Lipscomb mask mandate applies to all students, faculty, staff and guests in university buildings (regardless of vaccination status). The university is also pushing vaccines, informing students that “approximately 99% of those in our nation who are having serious adverse effects or are dying as a result of the virus are unvaccinated.” Lumination will continue to keep you updated...
Convocation marks new year and welcoming of new president

Convocation marks new year and welcoming of new president

With the tolling of the bell, Tuesday’s Presidential Convocation officially marked the start of the 2021-2022 school year, with outgoing President Randy Lowry and his successor Dr. Candice McQueen both looking toward the future. McQueen said she formed three phrases to help everyone navigate through this academic year together. The first is “being a light,” she said. That starts by learning and growing in Christ, whether it be through plugging in at the Gathering, breakouts, classes, discussions with friends or even at your local church, McQueen said. “Being a light will force us to put away our selfish ways and demands that we actually put a spotlight on [Jesus] and others,” she said. Then comes “bringing your best,” she said, noting that means to reach out for others who cannot do for themselves.  She said the community members must be prepared to encourage others, while also holding themselves accountable to a high bar. “Bringing your best requires forethought, intention and discipline—it does not just happen,” Finally, she said it is a matter of beginning the process.  “Take the first step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step,” she said,  quoting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “Although no one can go back and make a brand-new start, anyone can start now and make a brand-new ending,” she said. A highlight from the event was the presentation of the Kopio Award, given to Dr. Carl McKelvey. McKelvey,  the executive vice president of the Center for Spiritual Renewal, has been a part of the Lipscomb community for nearly 70 years (recently celebrating his 90th birthday)....
Men’s basketball releases 2021-22 slate

Men’s basketball releases 2021-22 slate

The regular season picture is clear for the Bisons after their full schedule was released on Thursday.   The season opens at home on November 9 against the Birmingham Southern Panthers, a Division III opponent that the Bisons used to regularly play during their time in the NAIA.  Later in the week, the team will head to Charleston, South Carolina for the College of Charleston Multiteam Event. There, the team will face College of Charleston on November 12, South Carolina State on November 13, and Loyola University-Maryland on November 14.  To close out the month of November, the Bisons face a Dayton team that appeared in the NIT last season on November 17, local opponent Tennessee Tech on November 23, and NAIA member Kentucky Christian in a return home on November 28.  December’s slate of games opens with the anticipated Battle of the Boulevard game versus the Belmont Bruins at the Curb Event Center on December 2. Third-year head coach Lennie Acuff is still seeking his first win in this historic rivalry against the Bruins.  The home schedule for the remainder of the month sees Lipscomb host Chattanooga on December 5, Tennessee State on December 12, Tennessee Wesleyan on December 19, and Alabama A&M on December 30. The remaining December road schedule will arguably feature the team’s toughest competition all season.  On December 8, the team will travel to South Beach to play the University of Miami Hurricanes. The Hurricanes played three ASUN opponents last season with a notable loss to FGCU, an opponent the Bisons split games with in regular season play last year.  The next road game will...
Volleyball blanks Bruins in one-sided Battle of the Boulevard

Volleyball blanks Bruins in one-sided Battle of the Boulevard

The Lipscomb women’s volleyball team swept archrivals Belmont by a 3-0 score on Tuesday. In the latest volleyball edition of the Battle of the Boulevard, the nickname for the rivalry between Lipscomb and Belmont athletics that has been contested since 1953, the Bisons took down the Bruins for the eighth consecutive time, tied with women’s tennis for the longest active winning streak for either side in any sport. For the second straight match, the clear offensive focal point was sophomore hitter Kam Bacus. An Edmond, Oklahoma native, Bacus accrued 17 kills to lead the Bisons on the night. Joining her with double digits in the kill category was fellow sophomore Meg Mersman, who contributed 10 of her own. Freshman Anna Aubele continued her impressive fledgling season with the Bisons, putting up six kills and a dig. Leading the team in digs were senior libero Delaney Smith with 11 and senior defensive specialist Logan Gish. Sophomore setter Delaney Dilfer continued to light up the scoreboard in the assist category as she has done since she first arrived in Nashville, putting up 34 assists and reaching the 30-assist mark for the seventh time in eight matches thus far. The Austin, Texas-born All-South Region and All-ASUN Freshman of the Year also landed two kills against the Bruins and five digs. With the win, Lipscomb advances to 2-6 on the year in one of their strongest-ever non-conference slates. Belmont drops to 2-5 after yet another loss to Lipscomb. The Bisons go back on the road for their final tournament weekend when they face St. John’s on Friday and Ohio on Saturday in the...
Men’s soccer earns third straight national ranking

Men’s soccer earns third straight national ranking

The Lipscomb men’s soccer team is ranked 22nd in the Week 3 NCAA Division I Top 25 released by United Soccer Coaches on Tuesday. After being unranked in preseason, the Bisons entered the ranking at #23 in Week One and made it to #21 in Week 2. This week, the team’s only match was a dramatic comeback from 3-1 down to earn a 3-3 draw at ETSU on Friday, marking the first week without a win for Lipscomb this year. The Bisons will make two more bids to stay undefeated on the year this week. They bring a 4-0-1 record into Tuesday night’s Battle of the Boulevard against Belmont followed by their ASUN opener at Bellarmine on...
Bisons, Bucs play to Sunday afternoon stalemate

Bisons, Bucs play to Sunday afternoon stalemate

The Lipscomb women’s soccer team drew with the East Tennessee State Buccaneers 1-1 on Sunday at the Lipscomb Soccer Complex in Nashville. Two golden goal overtime periods were not sufficient to find a winner after each side grabbed a goal in the first half. ETSU defender Raffaella Giuliano opened the scoring on a perfectly placed free kick. The graduate student from Italy picked out the top left corner on a 25-yard free kick on the right side of the goal, shooting across Bisons goalkeeper CJ Graham and beating her outstretched glove. That goal was Graham’s fifth allowed in 8 matches this year for Lipscomb. Graham, a sophomore from Swannanoa, North Carolina, added 7 saves to her total against the Bucs to reach 37 on the season. The home team would rectify the situation in the 36th minute when true freshman striker Shadia Valenzuela equalized. Valenzuela, a native of Buenaventura in the Colombian province of Cali, blasted a shot into the back of the ETSU net from close range, finishing off a quality service from fellow substitute Tori Wheeler on the left flank. Wheeler, a sophomore from Seattle, Washington, put up her first assist of the year in her seventh appearance this season. Despite a valiant effort from both sides, neither Lipscomb nor ETSU could find a goal after Valenzuela’s finish in the first 45. Sophomore defender Summer Ellmore came the closest for the Bisons, striking the post on a low effort inside the box. The Mount Juliet, Tennessee native found space at the top of the box and shot across freshman goalkeeper Shu Ohba’s goal, but a deflection from Ohba...
Men’s golfer Morris tees off on new season

Men’s golfer Morris tees off on new season

Sophomore golf standout Jack Morris — a Franklin native who chose to stay close to home for his college career — says he is looking to improve his game with the help of some competition from some new faces on the team. “We’ve got four new guys, two freshmen and then two transfers,” Morris said. “One of the transfers is from Purdue, one of the transfers was D2, All-American, we’ve got a much more competitive team,” adding that competition pushes him to work on his own skills every day. Morris is something of a hometown boy, choosing to be a Bison over other opportunities for a variety of reasons. “I chose Lipscomb, partially because the weather is a lot warmer…great business school…and we’ve got a great coaching staff along with a great program,” said the sophomore, who decided to accept Lipscomb’s offer in 2019. Family ties also played a role, since both of his parents are Lipscomb graduates. In high school, he led Franklin High School to a state championship while also earning the title Williamson County Golfer of the Year. He was named the 2019 Junior Cup MVP and the 2020 Tennessee Junior Amateur Champion. Such honors set him apart from those teeing up with him. College has been different, but he’s embracing it. “One of the things was playing for a team, not just individually,” he said. “This was kind of one of the things I had to adjust to, but I’m looking forward to this year and making improvements and getting better.” The team will head to Birmingham on Sept. 27 for the UAB Invitational. Photo...
Gallery: Campus community memorializes 9/11

Gallery: Campus community memorializes 9/11

The Lipscomb Community gathered early Monday morning to memorialize lives lost on September 11, 2001. Students, faculty and new President Candice McQueen placed flags 2,977 flags (one for each life lost in the 9/11 attack) throughout Bison Square. Gallery by Abigail Kopp and Jack Roper.   Memorial flags on campus. Photo by Jack...
GALLERY: Presidential Convocation in photos

GALLERY: Presidential Convocation in photos

The Presidential convocation was held at the Gathering on Aug. 31. It was full of Lipscomb traditions such as the bagpipe quartet and traditional outfits for faculty. This year was different than usual since it the convocation included the transfer of presidents. Click through the photos below to see photos from the event. Photos courtesy of Cora Coletti and Jack...
Gallery: Students celebrate finishing the first week of classes with Retro Sno Cones

Gallery: Students celebrate finishing the first week of classes with Retro Sno Cones

Last Friday, to celebrate finishing the first week of classes, students were treated with Retro Sno Cones. The snow cone truck drove onto campus, right in front of Johnson Hall, making it difficult to miss as students came from classes or dorms. The truck attracted quite the crowd and created a great time for students to gather together and enjoy a cold summer treat on a hot...
Gallery: Hot weather and COVID doesn’t hold back fall semester launch

Gallery: Hot weather and COVID doesn’t hold back fall semester launch

As the school year officially kicked off at Lipscomb, students did not let summer heat or “temporary” COVID restrictions get in the way of campus fun. In the coming week, the university is expected to announce the continuation or dismantlement of its indoor mask mandate. This comes as Lipscomb’s daily positive tests peaked Wednesday, with 10 university students testing positive for COVID. Gallery by Cora Coletti  ...
Gallery: Greek Life kicks off semester with rush fair

Gallery: Greek Life kicks off semester with rush fair

The days of “open rush” and “bid day” are coming upon the Lipscomb campus. Thursday afternoon, new students and prospective pledges filled the square with hopes of finding community in one of Lipscomb’s social clubs....
Freshmen Lipsync Battle celebrates new students and the songs from their childhood

Freshmen Lipsync Battle celebrates new students and the songs from their childhood

What was the most iconic event between the years 2000 and 2010? The release of Kelly Clarkson’s song “Since U Been Gone”?  Bedazzled jeans? The first Twilight movie? While there are many staples to choose from, they pale in comparison to the most important world premiere of all: The birth of the students in the Lipscomb University Class of 2025. Most undergraduate students on campus were born between 1999 and 2004, which makes the early 2000s an important time for the Bison Herd. To welcome this year’s Freshmen Class to the Lipscomb family, the Office of Community Life is hosting a Freshmen Lipsync Battle on September 18th. The theme for the battle is 2000s Mix. The event will feature songs released between the years 2000 and 2010, as selected by the 10 competition groups. Groups may perform a mash-up or a single song, utilizing up to four minutes. Performance groups will consist of up to 30 students and approximately seven students will serve as producers, assisting with marketing and logistics behind the scenes. According to Kelsy Campbell, Coordinator of Student Productions and Social Clubs, Freshmen Lipsync Battle will provide a “get-to-know-you experience right off the bat” and “a feel for the fun of Lipscomb.” Whether students sign up with friends or sign up alone, they will walk away from the event with shared memories and a strengthened sense of community. While the Bison Herd is experiencing Lipsync Battle for the first time, a rich musical tradition is well established at Lipscomb. Each Spring, undergraduate students compete in the time-honored tradition of Singarama in which they must prepare the choreography,...
REVIEW: Lorde’s ‘Solar Power’ is a sunny album that falls short of expectations

REVIEW: Lorde’s ‘Solar Power’ is a sunny album that falls short of expectations

Solar Power, the third album from the New Zealand artist Lorde, was released on Aug. 20. It serves as a sunny departure from her previous work, including 2017’s critically-acclaimed album, Melodrama. The new album reunites Lorde with musician and producer Jack Antonoff (fun., Bleachers) who is best known for producing multiple award-winning albums from the likes of St. Vincent, Carly Rae Jepsen, Lana Del Rey and Taylor Swift. On Solar Power, Lorde trades in the dark, complex sounds and lyrics of her older music for something more akin to what Sheryl Crow was doing in the early 2000s. Solar Power shows Lorde taking clearer inspirations from her influences, including her own mother’s poetry and ‘70s folk music. Solar Power makes the perfect soundtrack for a day at the beach, but it isn’t one that will stay on your mind long after it finishes. It’s a pretty album but predictable and unfortunately forgettable. Many critics and music fans have been accused of disliking Solar Power as it isn’t a “sad” album or because Lorde appears to be writing from a more optimistic and less relatable point of view. While it is possible that some people feel this way, the album’s main issue – especially in comparison to Melodrama – is that it simply isn’t complex. Melodrama wasn’t great because it was sad; it was renowned for its complexity of sound and how each of the songs on the album was unique but still cohesive. Likewise, Solar Power isn’t bad because it is happier – in fact, it really isn’t bad at all. It’s just simple and sometimes a bit boring. None of...
Bonnaroo 2021 canceled due to heavy rain

Bonnaroo 2021 canceled due to heavy rain

Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival will not take place again this year. The festival announced in an email and via social media that it would be canceling the event in the days leading up to its launch. Instead of being shut down for COVID like in 2020, this year it’s because of heavy rain. Bonnaroo has faced flooding from the rain that is impacting most of the southeast due to Hurricane Ida. In the email, they said, “While this weekend’s weather looks outstanding, currently Centeroo is waterlogged in many areas, the ground is incredibly saturated on our tollbooth paths, and the campgrounds are flooded to the point that we are unable to drive in or park vehicles safely.” This past day in Middle Tennessee has been raining nonstop, contributing to the flooding that has led them to deem the grounds unfit for concerts this year. The event was supposed to take place this upcoming weekend. Those with tickets will receive a refund within 30 days. Their message ended with the hope that Bonnaroo will return next summer. “WE WILL SEE YOU ON THE FARM IN JUNE...
‘Monsters University’ outdoor screening is success despite technical difficulties

‘Monsters University’ outdoor screening is success despite technical difficulties

To celebrate the first week of classes, the Office of Community Life hosted a drive-in movie night at Woodmont Hills Church of Christ this past Friday. Despite facing some screening challenges during the film, the showing was an enjoyable and eventful night for students.  Lipscomb students were given the opportunity to suggest ideas and then vote on the movie to be shown.; Monsters University was the chosen film. As students drove into the parking lot, Student Activity Board volunteers directed them to spots. Once settled, students were able to grab a sweet treat to eat during the movie at the snack table. Since this movie is a prequel to Monsters Inc., the story of how the main characters, Mike and Sully, met was greeted with laughter from the audience. Another early scene featuring a chaotic party was compared to Nordista Freeze’s Wednesday Nights We Eat performance during Quest Week by students. Despite its G-rating and young target audience, Monsters University was the perfect film for the occasion. Its messages of responding with determination and resilience to challenges can easily be motivational to college students who have faced a difficult past year of confusion and disappointment.   However, those themes are well-balanced with the fun-filled journey the main characters, Mike and Sully, take to turn their college’s most incompetent fraternity into the champions of the Scare Games, a multi-event competition designed to prove who the best scarer is.    Unfortunately, during the movie’s climax, the screen’s generator ran out of gas, causing Monsters University to cut off suddenly. SGA President Grant Hitchcock communicated the situation by quickly moving from car to car, explaining that a...
REVIEW: ‘Black Widow’ takes viewers on a much-needed return to the Marvel universe

REVIEW: ‘Black Widow’ takes viewers on a much-needed return to the Marvel universe

Since The Avengers first assembled on the silver screen in 2012, audiences have been clamoring for certain members of earth’s mightiest heroes to have their feature films. Fans have been especially eager for the Russian femme fatale, Natasha Romanov, aka Black Widow, to have her turn in the spotlight. After spending more than 16 years in development and numerous delays, including those caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, Black Widow finally was released this summer in theaters as well as premier access streaming via Disney Plus. The film’s setting is a mixture between sequel and interquel as it takes place between Captain America: Civil War (2016) and Avengers: Infinity War (2018) Following the events in Civil War, Romanov (Scarlett Johansson) is a fugitive and unexpectedly reunites with her estranged younger sister-figure/fellow assassin, Yelena Belova (Florence Pugh). The tense yet touching reunion is short-lived as a conspiracy involving the Black Widow program — a syndicate that trained female assassins including Romanov and Belova — arises. After spending countless years apart, Natasha and Yelena must put aside their differences to take down General Draykov and his army of Black Widows once and for all. The two sisters can’t do this task alone as they need to form a makeshift team with some of the toughest soldiers Russia has ever known: Their adoptive parents, super soldier Alexei Shostakov (David Harbour) and veteran Black Widow, Melina Vostokoff (Rachel Weisz). As the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU)’s first venture into the espionage film genre, Black Widow does an excellent job of recognizing its influences, such as the 007 films, all the while maintaining a slick and...