Lipscomb men’s soccer 2020 signing class could boost ‘attacking’ force

Lipscomb men’s soccer 2020 signing class could boost ‘attacking’ force

Lipscomb nursing alumni and students become health-care heroes in front lines of the pandemic

Lipscomb nursing alumni and students become health-care heroes in front lines of the pandemic

‘Southern Rock’ icon Charlie Daniels, advocate for Lipscomb vets, dies at 83

‘Southern Rock’ icon Charlie Daniels, advocate for Lipscomb vets, dies at 83

Masks, remote option for finals – Lipscomb plans for return to campus

Masks, remote option for finals – Lipscomb plans for return to campus

COVID-19 pandemic halts fall semester Global Learning

COVID-19 pandemic halts fall semester Global Learning

Lipscomb community grieves loss of ‘loving’ IDEAL student Savannah Miller

Lipscomb community grieves loss of ‘loving’ IDEAL student Savannah Miller


Lipscomb nursing alumni and students become health-care heroes in front lines of the pandemic

Lipscomb nursing alumni and students become health-care heroes in front lines of the pandemic

Lipscomb’s recent graduates and others currently in the nursing program have been thrown into the thick of the COVID-19 pandemic. They join an army of new nurses and nursing students nationwide who have been called into action because of the emergency. “Many signed up for the COVID-19 relief team at Vanderbilt and other area hospitals, which they all did voluntarily and not under any mandatory process from the School of Nursing or Lipscomb,” said Dr. Chelsia Harris, director of the nursing program at Lipscomb. “Many are getting paid in some capacity.” “Some of our graduates went straight to work in hospitals and other health-care facilities with COVID-19 units, post-graduation,” Harris said. “Out of 35 graduates, at least 15 or 16 that I know of have been doing that.” Kayla Neal is a recent graduate, who works as a patient care tech at Skyline Medical Center and AHC Cumberland nursing home. Neal, who graduated in May, has been in close vicinity of quarantined sectors. “They take our temperature at the beginning of the shift and make sure we are wearing our required masks,” Neal said. “All patients are screened beforehand and are also required to wear masks when being transported around.” Neal said the increasing number of patients, due to COVID, is putting stress on the healthcare system. “The nurse-to-patient ratio has increased from five-to-one to six-to-one just while I’ve been working there, and the responsibility for each employee has increased significantly as well,” said Neal. “COVID-19 is a stressful thing, but it gives me an advantage because I’m starting off as a new nurse in the midst of a...
‘Southern Rock’ icon Charlie Daniels, advocate for Lipscomb vets, dies at 83

‘Southern Rock’ icon Charlie Daniels, advocate for Lipscomb vets, dies at 83

Charlie Daniels, who died Monday at age 83, used his stardom and energy to help veterans’ causes, including helping provide the educational costs for veterans attending Lipscomb. Daniels, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, died after suffering a stroke.  The funeral for the Grand Ole Opry member, best known for “The Devil Went Down To Georgia” and with his Charlie Daniels Band helping to define the “Southern Rock” genre, is at 11 a.m. Friday at World Outreach Church in Murfreesboro. Sellars Funeral Home in Daniels’ adopted hometown of Mt. Juliet will host a visitation from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. Thursday. The singer played a part in Lipscomb’s Yellow Ribbon scholars program, which — along with the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill and Veterans Administration — funds the education of Post 9/11 veterans. For five years, Daniels put on a concert at Lipscomb for the Copperweld Charlie Daniels’ Scholarship for Heroes to raise funds for Lipscomb University’s Yellow Ribbon Enhancement Program.   The first installment of the Copperweld Charlie Daniels’ Scholarship for Heroes concert was held in spring 2010.  “Charlie Daniels was a talented musician, a man of deep conviction and principles, and a patriot,” said Lipscomb President Randy Lowry. “But most of all he was a compassionate person who tirelessly invested his time, talents and resources to make the lives of others better.”  Daniels was best known for his crossover hit from 1979, “The Devil Went Down to Georgia,” which remains a staple on country and classic rock radio stations. The song made it to No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and won Daniels the Grammy for...
Masks, remote option for finals – Lipscomb plans for return to campus

Masks, remote option for finals – Lipscomb plans for return to campus

Because of the uncertainty and threat of COVID-19, Lipscomb students will be given the option of staying home after Thanksgiving and taking their exams on-line rather than in-person at the end of the fall semester. Classes will begin Aug. 24, with the last day of finals Dec. 16, according to the university. “The fall semester will continue with on-campus classes until Thanksgiving break,” according to the Lipscomb Return to Campus web page. “In an effort to be both mindful of additional travel expenses and individual student health concerns, students will have the option of staying home after Thanksgiving break and completing the last week of classes and finals remotely.” “I think it’s a good idea, I’d rather be safe than sorry,” said senior public relations student Makena Sneed. “There are a lot of students who have to travel, and considering all the travel restrictions there are right now — I’m not sure how the numbers will continue to trend — but virtual finals sound like a great idea.” “I think it could allow for some really great learning opportunities and allow students to flourish in ways that they aren’t usually able to with a regular exam schedule at Lipscomb,” said Sneed. Move-in for new students is scheduled over three days this year, Aug. 14-16. Quest week and new student orientation will look the same as in the past for the most part, taking place on Aug. 17-23. Fall graduation is still planned as an on-campus event on December 19. But Lipscomb will continue to monitor the regional guidelines to determine if an in-person event can be held at that...
COVID-19 pandemic halts fall semester Global Learning

COVID-19 pandemic halts fall semester Global Learning

With the European Union banning American tourists beginning this summer and other factors as the COVID-19 pandemic worsens, study abroad programs have been postponed indefinitely. “This tough decision was a collaborative agreement between our Office of Global Learning, Risk Management, and upper administration,” said Rebecca Zanolini, director of Global Learning, citing information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the State Department as source material in this decision. “Given the current information we have and due to a number of factors out of our control, such as many countries either limiting entrance or imposing a 14-day quarantine on those entering, it is the decision of the university to cancel our fall 2020 study abroad programs,” said Provost W. Craig Bledsoe. The EU has said that American tourists will be banned from entering the continent because the virus is raging uncontrolled here.  It is similar to the winter’s ban on most European visitors to the U.S., issued when COVID-19 was reaching its peak in several countries. The university is now making accommodations for all students who planned to study abroad this semester to help them transition into a semester on-campus, including classes and housing registration assistance. “Even with this temporary situation regarding fall 2020 programs, we are moving ahead with our investment in Lipscomb’s global learning program and on-campus activities for students interested in future international travel opportunities,” said Bledsoe. “In the next few weeks the university plans to purchase the Florence villa that has served our global students so well for the last few years,” Bledsoe said. “This is a significant investment in our global learning program...
Lipscomb community grieves loss of ‘loving’ IDEAL student Savannah Miller

Lipscomb community grieves loss of ‘loving’ IDEAL student Savannah Miller

Savannah Miller, remembered as a “sweet, loving” student in Lipscomb’s IDEAL program died Saturday “following complications related to a medical procedure,” said President Randy Lowry. “It is with a heavy heart that I share with you the news of the loss … of Savannah Miller, a student in Lipscomb’s IDEAL program, Lowry said in an email to the student body. Miller was well-known for her positive attitude around campus and her internships with admissions and Student Life. She was a member of Phi Nu and a resident of Johnson Hall. “Savannah was a sweet, loving, joyful, and caring friend,” said Riley Hoag, also a student in the IDEAL program. “She was always there to help me out when I needed someone to talk to. She always put a smile on everyone’s face during school.” Savannah could be easily found drinking a frappuccino in the Starbucks on campus, according to Hoag. Grief sessions have been set up by the Office of Student Life as virtual Zoom calls. The links have been sent out to the student body and can be found here. Lipscomb plans to have a memorial service on campus in the fall to honor her life. More details will be released on that when the details are finalized, according to the university. Miller is survived by her mother, Renee Miller; her father, Bill Miller; three siblings, Shayna, Justin and Jacob; and her extended family. She was preceded in death by her brother, Garrett. “What we are hearing over and over again in the hours following her death is that Savannah is clearly a young lady who will be missed...
Lipscomb men’s soccer 2020 signing class could boost ‘attacking’ force

Lipscomb men’s soccer 2020 signing class could boost ‘attacking’ force

Lipscomb men’s soccer has announced a new roster for the coming season, and the eyes of the coach were focused on ability to attack offensively. “We’ve historically been known as a team that has a really potent offense and some really dynamic attacking pieces,” said head coach Charles Morrow. The coaches were looking for more of that attacking force with this signing class, with high hopes to improve that sting in their offense. “In addition to filling some key positions like Ben Loche as our holding midfielder, that we lost last year, really the focus of this group was finding attacking players that could give us more of a threat in the attack and scoring goals,” said Morrow. “We’re really happy with the group that we got and the quality they bring as players and really excited with the quality of people that we’re seeing so far,” said Morrow. Here is more on the signing class and some of their notable achievements. Gerik Jakubowksi is a forward from Phoenix, Arizona. 1st-Team All-Region at Sunnyslope High School. He Led TSV Allershausen in assists, second in goals for a season. Won U16 State Cup Championship with Real Salt Lake AZ  and he will be joining his brother Zarek Jakubowksi, an upcoming junior, on the Bisons roster. Austin Marfell is a winger from Warner Robins, Georgia. He is a first-team advanced to ECNL National Championship Final and a Team MVP for Houston County High School. Marfell is a two-year team captain and won the regional championship with HCHS. Marlon Grossman is a forward from Schwaebisch Gmueno, Germany. Grossman made 26 appearances in...
Lady Bisons softball season cut short due to the coronavirus

Lady Bisons softball season cut short due to the coronavirus

By Megan Kuper, Shelby Talbert and Rose Schaddelee The Lady Bisons softball team looks for its 12th win of the 2020 season, approaching the fourth inning ahead by 10. Less than an inning later, Lipscomb defeats the Lady Tarheels due to the “mercy” run rule. The girls celebrate the big win and give hope to having the best season yet… until the unimaginable happened. The day after the Bisons big win, all winter and spring sports were brought to an end by the NCAA, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak that became a national emergency. “There’s no way that it’s over,” said Jenna Endris, a Bison whose junior season abruptly ended. “We did not see it coming at all,” she said, drawing a long, slow breath. “And it doesn’t seem real….” Hearing the season is over sprung many “Whys?” to Endris and the team: ”Why did we want to kill ourselves in the fall from conditioning and weights? And why did we go to practice for four hours every single day to not even compete for a championship?” Every day gets easier for the junior, she explained. The Lipscomb Bisons are reigning conference champions, and her positive attitude was fueled by cracking light-hearted jokes about going “back-to-pause-back (instead of “back-to-back”) conference champs” in her final season as a Lady Bison next season. Endris was not the only one feeling the impact of the season’s cancellation. “There were lots of tears and many expressed frustration, you know some having worked their whole softball careers and to have it end like this….,” said coach Kristin Ryman. “However we tried to remind...
A canceled match turns into a canceled season for Lipscomb men’s golf team

A canceled match turns into a canceled season for Lipscomb men’s golf team

By Anica Gilbert, Ben Browning, Riley Hoag and Casey King Lipscomb men’s golf team had a lot of potential before the COVID-19 national emergency ended the season and cut those hopes short. “We were on a trajectory to the postseason,” said coach Will Brewer. “That’s what our goal was at the beginning of August and we had a great shot. “Everyone was coming together and playing well. The team was really gelling.” Brewer said.”The team was stunned as they watched a canceled match turn into a canceled season. The team had high hopes and a promising chance at continuing to the postseason.” Then came COVID-19. “They were very emotional, very shocked and a lot of disbelief,” said coach Brewer. “The best part of the season was before everything got shut down because the team was working hard and pushing each other,” said freshman Gregor Mckenzie. “We had something nice going with the team, where everybody was concerned about each other, and everyone was accountable for what they were doing.” For senior Conner McKay, relationships with his teammates were especially important, he started adding that the talks with his teammates led him to redefine his faith and relationship with God. “This year was different because of the chemistry. I started to grow in my faith and a couple of guys on the team introduced me to the Bible for the first time,” McKay said. “About a month ago I accepted Christ as my Lord and savior.” Despite the ups and downs, the team is continuing to move forward in training for next year’s matches, but with all golf courses being...
Coronavirus cuts short promising 2020 Bison baseball campaign

Coronavirus cuts short promising 2020 Bison baseball campaign

By. Makena Sneed, Alex Newsome and Erika Plunkett The 2020 Lipscomb Bison baseball team was off to the best start in program history when its season — along with the rest of the country — came to a crashing halt as the coronavirus concern grew. “I don’t think any of us knew the magnitude of what was going on, and to have the season canceled at first it was like, ‘wow, that is that really what we’re doing,’” said Bisons head coach Jeff Forehand. “And then as the thing has played out a little bit more we’ve all recognized that it was probably the best decision.” While the shock of the sudden decision has faded into understanding and respect for the safety of players, coaches and fans, the pain of losing such a promising season is still fresh on the Bisons’ minds. “My heart dropped when I heard the news,” said sophomore catcher Chaz Bertolani. “It was a total letdown to hear from our coach that our season was terminated. I felt heartbroken looking at my teammates, as we sat in the bullpen in silence.” “We were just super disappointed because we knew we had a really good thing going,” said senior infielder Haddon Adams. On March 30, the NCAA made an unprecedented decision to try and ease the heartbreak from the impact of COVID-19 when it was announced that all spring athletes will receive an extra year of eligibility. The catcher said that certainly won’t hurt the team next season: “Preparation will be the same [for next season], but with all the  returning and new players, our team...
Athletic director discusses NCAA rules changes, ‘heartbreaking’ COVID-19 impact on Bisons sports

Athletic director discusses NCAA rules changes, ‘heartbreaking’ COVID-19 impact on Bisons sports

Telling Lipscomb athletes that sports for the semester had ended hurt Athletic Director Philip Hutcheson as much as it hurt the athletes. “It was totally heartbreaking knowing what that meant for all of our spring sport athletes,” Hutcheson said. “When I went and told the baseball team about it, I felt like I was talking to 35 guys who had all torn their ACLs at the same time and their careers were over.” From quarantines and stay-at-home orders to school closing and everything in between, the coronavirus (COVID-19) has changed daily life for people across the world. For collegiate athletes and administrators, the virus has flipped their seasons upside down. In an announcement made in early March, the NCAA canceled the seasons of all spring and winter sports. This included the popular March Madness national basketball tournament. “Obviously there are many worse things going on in the world right now than not being able to play a sport,” Hutcheson said. “But for all of these students it’s very important and something they’ve worked towards for a long time. They realize that it’s not just games they’re going to miss, it’s time with their teammates and coaches.” To make up for the inability to play, the NCAA made the decision to give athletes playing spring sports an extra year of eligibility. Some athletes, however, may not be able to take advantage of this. “We know already that about half of the seniors will not be coming back,” Hutcheson said. “The rest of them – some financial decisions have to be made. Most spring sport athletes, if not all of them,...
Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb’s 129th graduation ceremony looked quite different than was expected when the school year began in August. Allen Arena, which typically hosts the celebratory event, sat empty on Saturday when the COVID-19 outbreak forced the university to host its first virtual graduation. From the charge to the alma mater, Lipscomb faculty and students combined live and pre-recorded clips to create an all-new commencement ceremony experience. President Randy Lowry opened the commencement ceremony with a video pre-recorded in Allen Arena. “Well this isn’t exactly like I imagined it,” Lowry said. “Here I am standing in Allen Arena, and if this was a normal moment: Students you would be here with me. You would be dressed in caps and gowns, and there would be five thousand people surrounding us as this amazing moment took place. We would march in, we’d hear the bagpipes; the faculty would follow a little bit later. You’d be on the stage walking across, I’d shake your hand, and you would have your college degree, your graduate degree. You would have completed this moment, and the celebration would be wonderful. “The reality is we all know that this is a different time. And we’re giving up something:We’re giving our Allen Arena moment in order to protect others,” said  Lowry. One of the many faculty members joining  Lowry in conducting the online ceremony, Dean of Community Life Prentice Ashford gave out the Stephen Marsh Award. “Steve was a 1977 Lipscomb graduate and the son of one of our former board members, Lee Marsh,” said Ashford. “He was a Christian example in every aspect of his life as a...
Lipscomb Full Moon Festival raises $6,700 for YES Mission

Lipscomb Full Moon Festival raises $6,700 for YES Mission

Lipscomb clubs, Delta Omega and Theta Psi host the Full Moon Festival each spring semester to raise money for a different mission. This year the clubs raised $6,700 for “The Mission of Youth Encouragement Services (YES).” The mission of yes is to “enrich the lives of children in Inner City Nashville, helping them to develop academically, physically, spiritually and socially.” The event functions as a philanthropy event but also united the student body through music. Throughout the evening, from 6 pm till 9 pm, students perform high-end karaoke with a live band and singing songs they have rehearsed. There is dancing, fun, and music all geared around a 50’s theme. The event is essentially a sock-hop playing current music mixed with old hits.   Riley Hoag captured a gallery of the event here. ...
Career-highs lead the Bisons past Kennesaw State in 73-85 win

Career-highs lead the Bisons past Kennesaw State in 73-85 win

The Lipscomb Bisons opened there 2020 home slate on Thursday night hosting ASUN opponent, Kennesaw State in their third conference game of the year. Despite a late comeback attempt by the Owls, the Bisons were able to pull away with a 73-85 victory behind senior guard Michael Buckland’s career-high 25 points and redshirt sophomore center Ahsan Asadullah’s career-high 28 points. “For about 34 minutes, I thought we played really, really well – some of our best play offensively. We went 13-26 from the 3-point line; the reason we did that is that we moved the ball,” said Lipscomb head coach Lennie Acuff. The two teams played competitively for much of the first half with both sides going on scoring runs, however, it was the Bisons who went into halftime with the lead 31-39, due to several key defensive stops. “I can come in as a senior and demand that defensive mentality from the younger guys. Because that’s where we are going to get conference wins,” Buckland said. “We are going to get scouted, offense is going to be stagnant at times, and so when it does get stagnant you have to be able to make stops on the defensive end.” Coming out of the half, Lipscomb got off to a hot start and began to take control of the game, leading by 20 points with 10 minutes remaining in the game. But, Kennesaw State refused to go home quietly.  “Our problem this year has been that we will have little lulls, and we have to learn to eliminate those lulls,” Buckland said. This lull cost the Bisons’ their large...
A hard loss for Bisons Basketball in 146th Battle of the Boulevard

A hard loss for Bisons Basketball in 146th Battle of the Boulevard

The Bisons took another hard loss to the Bruins in the second installment of the Battle of the Boulevard this season. The final from the Curb Event Center was 80-75. “We’re sitting at 3 in 6 and that’s not where we wanna be,” Head Coach Lennie Acuff said. “But there’s probably not many people at our level playing the schedule we play, and so we just need to keep getting better.” The team won two road games over the last week and a half against Navy and Tennessee Tech, and they also hung in for the majority of the Xavier game, despite being without three of their starters. Michaell Buckland, Jake Wolfe and Greg Jones have sat the bench until tonight, due to injuries suffered in the first matchup against Belmont last month. “It helped getting a couple of guys back tonight that have been out for a couple of weeks,” Coach Acuff said. This, the 146th installment of the Battle of the Boulevard, was a Battle as always. The score stayed tight until the middle of the second half when the Bruins began to knock down shot after shot gaining a 13 point lead on the Bisons. Belmont’s freshman guard Adam Kunkel got on a hot streak shooting and got the Bruins score up to 71-58 on the Bisons with 2:42 left in the second half. “The thing I think he’s gotten better at is, he’s not a catch-and-shoot guy. He’s obviously a really good shooter, but he’s got game, he can put it down… he’s much more athletic than you think.” Coach Acuff said about Adam Kunkel....
GALLERY: Lady Women’s Basketball takes on Eastern Illinois

GALLERY: Lady Women’s Basketball takes on Eastern Illinois

Coming off two straight losses during the ASUN-MAAC challenge last weekend, Lipscomb was looking to bounce back at home against the Eastern Illinois Panthers Sunday afternoon. Without starting sophomore center Dorie Harrison and starting junior guard Sydney Shelton — the Bisons had quite a challenge.giving their leading scorer, freshman guard Jalyn Holcomb, a supporting cast. Much of the first half was controlled by the Panthers’ disruptive offense in the paint, behind 6’1” sophomore center Abby Wahl’s 12 first-half points. For the Bisons, junior forward Taylor Clark and senior forward Emily Kmec both got into early foul trouble, which aided in EIU’s success down low....
‘Southern Rock’ icon Charlie Daniels, advocate for Lipscomb vets, dies at 83

‘Southern Rock’ icon Charlie Daniels, advocate for Lipscomb vets, dies at 83

Charlie Daniels, who died Monday at age 83, used his stardom and energy to help veterans’ causes, including helping provide the educational costs for veterans attending Lipscomb. Daniels, a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, died after suffering a stroke.  The funeral for the Grand Ole Opry member, best known for “The Devil Went Down To Georgia” and with his Charlie Daniels Band helping to define the “Southern Rock” genre, is at 11 a.m. Friday at World Outreach Church in Murfreesboro. Sellars Funeral Home in Daniels’ adopted hometown of Mt. Juliet will host a visitation from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. Thursday. The singer played a part in Lipscomb’s Yellow Ribbon scholars program, which — along with the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill and Veterans Administration — funds the education of Post 9/11 veterans. For five years, Daniels put on a concert at Lipscomb for the Copperweld Charlie Daniels’ Scholarship for Heroes to raise funds for Lipscomb University’s Yellow Ribbon Enhancement Program.   The first installment of the Copperweld Charlie Daniels’ Scholarship for Heroes concert was held in spring 2010.  “Charlie Daniels was a talented musician, a man of deep conviction and principles, and a patriot,” said Lipscomb President Randy Lowry. “But most of all he was a compassionate person who tirelessly invested his time, talents and resources to make the lives of others better.”  Daniels was best known for his crossover hit from 1979, “The Devil Went Down to Georgia,” which remains a staple on country and classic rock radio stations. The song made it to No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and won Daniels the Grammy for...
COVID halts 57th annual Singarama, but participants discuss informal staging and the relationships they established

COVID halts 57th annual Singarama, but participants discuss informal staging and the relationships they established

The COVID-19 pandemic proved fatal for one of Lipscomb’s storied spring traditions: Singarama. It would have been the 57th edition of the show — which was scheduled for April 2-2 — for which students and their clubs work hard to stage. The fact that all that work — preparations, rehearsals, etc. — had been put in and the show was folded before its premiere troubled many students. “Hearing that Singarama was canceled was the thing that was probably hardest for me to process, just because that’s what I was most looking forward to for senior year,” said Hannah Jones, who was choreographer for “Short Sighted,” one of the three performances, all set around the theme of “20/20 vision.” The other two were titled “The Eye of The Hurricane” and “A Fresh Pair of Eyes.” Although the shows could not be performed, they were staged together for one night only, so all involved got the opportunity to see what they had been working toward. That staging in Collins came the Thursday before spring break, which also turned out — because of the virus — to be the final day of on-campus classes. “Singarama is really about community,” said senior Ally Whiting, assistant director of “Short Sighted.  “It’s worth it for the community no matter what happens. “The reason I continue to be a part of the creative team is just getting to build relationships with people, because you definitely get to know people that you would not have known otherwise,” she said, adding that the one-night staging was both “goofy” and “fun.” She said the relationships made during Singarama “are...
Music gets muffled by COVID-19 pandemic; Festivals, clubs and even Rolling Stones silenced

Music gets muffled by COVID-19 pandemic; Festivals, clubs and even Rolling Stones silenced

COVID-19 has pretty much eliminated the month of June for music festival goers in Middle Tennessee and around the country. And the rest of the summer is in question as well. Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival, the massive four-day celebration of all forms of music and entertainment had been scheduled to take place June 11-14 down at The Farm in Manchester. But this year, because of the pandemic, the festival was moved to September 24-27, in hopes the virus will have run its course by then. Tickets for the festival, which generally reaches near-sellout (80,000 or so proportions), will be honored for September’s new date. “Please continue to radiate positivity through this uncharted time in our world. Thank you for your continued support and we look forward to seeing you on The Farm (the pastureland where the annual festivities are held) this fall,” reads a message posted on the festival’s web site. Even more disastrous to Nashville economy and for fans of country music is the news that the annual CMA Fest was canceled completely for this summer, ending a 48-year run. “As the world is still greatly affected by the spread of COVID-19, we cannot in good conscience risk the health and well-being of our fans, artists, staff and country music community,” is the statement from the Country Music Association. More than 40,000 fans annually attend each of the four nights’ “big concerts” in Nissan Stadium, home of the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League. But there are many other fans who come to the city and fill up hotel rooms and honky-tonks for affiliated activities —...
Lipscomb CEA announces partnership with Kingdom Story Company at special premiere of I Still Believe

Lipscomb CEA announces partnership with Kingdom Story Company at special premiere of I Still Believe

Just before business shutdowns, social distancing guidelines and quarantine mandates began, the Lipscomb College of Entertainment and the Arts community had the opportunity to celebrate the release of the new Christian movie, I Still Believe, with their newly announced partner: Kingdom Story Company. Taking place at the AMC Thoroughbred 20 theater in Franklin, the evening began with guests walking down the red carpet. Jeremy Camp, the real-life inspiration for this story of faith and love, posed with fans for photos alongside his family. The film was shown in Theater 6 which was reserved solely for Lipscomb students and staff. The movie “commercials” included a display of Lipscomb CEA student talent in the form of short films, promotional videos and music videos. Just before the opening credits, Lipscomb’s administration took the stage to announce the partnership between the production company and the CEA. Then, Jon and Andy Erwin and Jeremy Camp took the stage to share more about the film and the process of making it. Many students were on the edge of their seats listening to what these passionate artists had to say. The producers shared their stories of humble beginnings and how blessed they felt for the success they had achieved in the industry. The wisdom which they imparted on all the young, hopeful filmmakers in the room was, “Dream big. Dream bold. Dream impossible.”  “I feel like God has anointed this film,” Jeremy Camp said. “There are thousands of stories and the fact that they chose my story is a huge honor.” The film was a heart-warming story of both love and faith that stands strong in...
Henna Night leaves a mark on students experiencing new cultures

Henna Night leaves a mark on students experiencing new cultures

As a part of the annual WOW (Welcome to Our World) Week, students organized Henna Night to bring the unique ceremonies and cuisines of Arab, Indian and Middle Eastern cultures to campus. “I want people to know that it’s [henna is] so much more than just decoration,” said Kiana Rafiei, a student organizer for Lipscomb’s Office of Intercultural Development. “Yes, it’s beautiful, but there’s a meaning behind why my culture does this.” During the event, students hired a local henna artist to give interested students the chance to experience the tradition. Henna is a natural flowering plant that is ground into a thick paste and then piped directly on the skin. The wet paste is left on for 15 to 20 minutes until it dries and can be removed, leaving behind a light red or brown tattoo. This temporary body art can last anywhere from a few days to two weeks depending on how dark the stain is. In recent years, henna has evolved into Western fair entertainment and the design, called mehndi, is often mimicked in permanent tattoos. But, as Rafiei noted, the application of henna itself is a deeply rooted art form across many cultures. “I’m Persian, but we do henna as decoration during Eid, the Islamic New Year, as well,” Rafiei said. “It means good luck and prosperity so it’s really important that we apply it with our family. It’s also applied as a pre-wedding tradition in some countries. Usually, the night before a wedding, the bride is given really detailed henna as a symbol of her devotion.” The swirls and swoops of a henna design...