Men’s soccer masterminds a comeback for the ages

Men’s soccer masterminds a comeback for the ages

Volleyball comes away empty-handed at Gamecocks

Volleyball comes away empty-handed at Gamecocks

Women’s soccer soars past Jacksonville State

Women’s soccer soars past Jacksonville State

Lipscomb pivots from mask mandate to recommendation

Lipscomb pivots from mask mandate to recommendation

Volleyball bests new ASUN rivals, grabs 5th straight win

Volleyball bests new ASUN rivals, grabs 5th straight win

Kate Popova changing women’s tennis culture, leading by example

Kate Popova changing women’s tennis culture, leading by example


Lipscomb pivots from mask mandate to recommendation

Lipscomb pivots from mask mandate to recommendation

After several months of campus-wide indoor mask requirements, Lipscomb is moving to an indoor mask recommendation, effective Oct. 16. Lipscomb students and faculty were alerted of the upcoming change via an email sent out Thursday afternoon ahead of the fall break long weekend. The relaxed guidelines are a result of a decrease in COVID numbers campus-wide. “Due to your diligence, we have seen a significant decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases and individuals in isolation or quarantine. As a result, effective Saturday, Oct. 16, the updated mask policy is that masks will no longer be mandatory but will be recommended,” said the email sent to the Lipscomb community. While masks will no longer be required indoors, they will still be worn inside in certain situations. Faculty may still choose to require facial coverings in any of their respective classes and labs. Anyone preparing or serving food in a group setting must also wear a mask. Another exception to the rule is that anyone who is asked to put on a mask by someone within six feet of them is required to comply. “When requested in good faith by a Lipscomb student, faculty, staff member or guest who is presently wearing a mask indoors, a Lipscomb student, faculty, staff member or guest who is within six feet is required to wear a mask,” according to the statement prepared by the university. Lipscomb will continue to offer vaccination clinics with both the flu and COVID-19 vaccines every Tuesday and Wednesday afternoon in Bennett Campus Center. Lumination will continue to provide updates about Lipscomb’s COVID...
Lipscomb extends mask mandate to Oct. 15

Lipscomb extends mask mandate to Oct. 15

The Lipscomb community will remain under an indoor mask mandate till at least October 15. The extension was updated on the university’s website and follows a recent decrease in campus cases. “Because of your diligent efforts, the number of positive cases on campus as well as the number of students, faculty and staff in quarantine is headed in the right direction,” said the university in an email to the community. “Let’s keep up the hard work so we can continue to have a strong semester!” The Lipscomb mask mandate applies to all students, faculty, staff and guests in university buildings (regardless of vaccination status). The university is also pushing vaccines, informing students that “approximately 99% of those in our nation who are having serious adverse effects or are dying as a result of the virus are unvaccinated.” Lumination will continue to keep you updated...
20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

20 years later, Lipscomb veterans describe tragedy, loss, inspiration of 9/11

“A plane just hit one of the World Trade Center Towers.” R. Samuel Lynn, Lipscomb veterans advocate and a former Marine, recalls hearing those words from his desk at an architectural firm in upstate New York on Sept. 11, 2001. He immediately thought that a small plane must have mistakenly gone off course. “It seemed like just a couple of minutes later [that the secretary] … slow-walked into the office,” Sam Lynn said. “[Her] face was just white. She said, ‘Another plane just hit one of the towers.'” “And that’s when … my heart hit my toes.” Lynn and his colleagues watched the news channel all day, as most Americans did, and realized that they were witnessing a terrorist attack against the United States. The event would alter the trajectory of America and the world– they knew “it was all going to change.” Lynn was right about the changes, which included the creation of The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the United State’s engagement in war in the Middle East. The attack was the impetus for 20 years of consequences. Four years after 9/11, Lynn became a Marine. He spent 10 years in the military and completed two tours of duty in the Middle East with Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was injured during his service. After rehabilitation, he became a combat marksmanship instructor. Today, he serves the Lipscomb University Community as director of Veterans Services. Lynn’s has a multi-level view on the events, since he experienced the events of 9/11 as a civilian and then participated in the war that followed as a Marine. Veteran Programs Coordinator Jimmie L....
McQueen addresses students during first Gathering as president

McQueen addresses students during first Gathering as president

On her first day as Lipscomb University’s 18th president, Dr. Candice McQueen made several announcements during Tuesday’s Gathering. After introductions from SGA President Grant Hitchcock and her daughter, freshman Abigail McQueen, Dr. McQueen made her entrance on the podium. McQueen, greeted by a warm round of applause from the audience, cited the students as the primary reason for accepting this leadership position. “Lipscomb University exists for students,” said McQueen. “And we will empower our community, our administrators to make sure students are job one, and we will live out the visions of our founders to help you, our students, to be equipped to fully integrate with your academic passions and careers. McQueen made a few special announcements, such as the start of the President’s Student Advisory Council, otherwise known as PSAC. PSAC will allow McQueen to directly hear feedback from students through a collaborative effort with the SGA. Nominations for council members are ongoing, with the council set to be announced toward the end of September. To make up for the sophomore class’ lost opportunities, McQueen revealed that next week will be sophomore week. At the start of the week, sophomores will receive a gift package filled with an assortment of treats as well as tickets to events that lead up to an exclusive silent disco party. McQueen addressed and confirmed that the recent dining staff shortages and restaurant closures were due to a COVID outbreak. To make up for the inconvenience, students were treated to a cookout of hamburgers and hot dogs as an appreciation for their patience and willingness to cooperate with the staff shortages. Finally, McQueen recognized...
Labor Day: The history behind our day off

Labor Day: The history behind our day off

Every year, students of all ages look forward to the first Monday of September, whether that holds an end-of-summer get together or a break from an already busy school year. But where exactly did Labor Day come from, and why is it a significant holiday in the history of America? The story of Labor Day starts with the labor movements of the late 19th century. Conditions for American workers at the time were notoriously bad. Twelve-hour workdays and unsanitary factories made their jobs dangerous, and benefits (such as health care) were either severely limited or non-existent. There were also no laws protecting child workers, who were often subjected to particularly unsafe jobs, like getting into and cleaning out chimneys, because of their small size.  To protest their unfair treatment, labor unions across the country organized strikes, some of which were more violent than others. In the infamous Pullman strike of 1894, the American Railroad Union led a nationwide boycott of Pullman Palace train cars to protest wage cuts. The strike ended only when the government sent troops to Chicago, which triggered a series of deadly riots. Such shocking events caused many writers, photographers, activists, and politicians to turn their focus to exposing the horrors of factories, helping workers fight for their rights, and pushing for legislators to make serious changes. As greater awareness of the plight of workers began to spread, many advocated for a holiday to celebrate American workers and their contributions to society. In 1887, Oregon became the first state to recognize Labor Day as an official holiday, and four other states (Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and...
Men’s soccer masterminds a comeback for the ages

Men’s soccer masterminds a comeback for the ages

The Lipscomb men’s soccer team won in hardly-believable fashion against the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles Saturday night. A night on which nothing went right became a night no Bison fan will soon forget in a matter of moments. It took some time, though, for the storyline to develop positively. Though the Bisons started brightly on paper, they were unable to find a goal in the first half. Their five shots and two on frame were unable to beat Eagles goalkeeper Gustavo Vasconcelos, who was excellent throughout. The Recife, Brazil native made two high-quality saves to deny the Bisons in the first 45, and the home side weren’t rewarded for their attacking exploits as a result. Meanwhile, against the run of play, FGCU found the opener on a breakaway in the 42nd minute. Trevin Myers received a short goal kick from Vasconcelos and quickly played a deep, high pass to Canadian striker O’Vonte Mullings. Mullings, who came into the match with five of the team’s nine goals on the year, added his sixth of the campaign with a stellar one-on-one strike to beat Bisons goalkeeper Michael Sibley. The Eagles took that 1-0 lead into the break, and kept the momentum up early in the second half. Mullings created an early opportunity for a second goal in the 50th minute, but Sibley was equal to his effort and kept the ball out. The two sides traded attacking opportunities down the stretch, but perhaps the most important moment of the contest happened off the ball. At the 78-minute mark, Miles Robinson was issued a yellow card by the center referee for dissent,...
Volleyball comes away empty-handed at Gamecocks

Volleyball comes away empty-handed at Gamecocks

The Lipscomb volleyball team lost to Jacksonville State 3-0 Friday night at Pete Mathews Coliseum in Jacksonville, Alabama. On a difficult night to say the least, Lipscomb lost a six-match winning streak and lost an ASUN match for just the second time all season. A raucous rural Alabama environment was the backdrop to a day of disappointments for the Bisons, who never seemed to truly be in the rhythm they’ve recently perfected. In an uncommon scene in collegiate American volleyball, “The Pete” was bustling all night long thanks to a cheerleading squad, a full band, and plenty of excited fans cheering on the red and gray. For Lipscomb, on the other hand, an informal count was made for traveling fans and exactly two were spotted. It proved to be a difficult environment to play in, per UAB transfer Caroline Stogner, but it wasn’t the overarching issue on the night. “It was definitely a loud environment, something we’re not used to,” Stogner said. “But I don’t think it affected us as much; obviously we didn’t play as well as we wanted to play, but I don’t think that had a big impact on our play,” said the sophomore from Plano, Texas. Stogner came off the bench to deliver five kills offensively for the Bisons, her third-highest output since joining Lipscomb this season. In the end, it wasn’t a sufficient boost for a Bisons team that struggled from the first moment. JSU raced out to a 6-1 lead, forcing a quick timeout from head coach Brandon Rosenthal. Lipscomb did claw their way back to a 7-6 deficit, but could never gain...
Women’s soccer soars past Jacksonville State

Women’s soccer soars past Jacksonville State

The Bisons got back to their winning ways in a Thursday night showdown with the Jacksonville State Gamecocks by a 4-1 scoreline Thursday. Both teams were looking for a win in this critical west division match; Lipscomb especially were desperate after a recent 2-1 loss at Eastern Kentucky. “I’m really pleased,” said Coach O’Brien. “To rebound off a result that was tough to take this was exactly what we needed.” The Bisons were rowdy from the get-go, maintaining the ball in their attacking third and earning a corner kick in the first five minutes. The first shot of the night was a goal by redshirt sophomore Molly Grant from just a few yards out, with the assist credited to Haley Williams.  Their attacks weren’t the only thing powerful from the start. The Bisons’ strong defense forced the Gamecocks to play the ball back often, altering the Gamecocks’ ability to string together attacks.  About halfway through the first 45, momentum shifted slightly as the Gamecocks began to hold more possession in search of the equalizing goal. In an attempt to capitalize on a good-looking run, the Gamecocks registered a shot on goal but it was an easy grab for Lipscomb goalkeeper CJ Graham, her first save of the night. With a lead in place, Coach O’Brien brought in 4 pairs of fresh legs. Skye Baun, Noa Ganthier, Shadia Valenzuela, and Kammy McGee contributed a hefty effort to finish the half. The second half was all Bisons from whistle to buzzer. It began much like the first: immediate control from the home team.  With the help of Allie Dunn, Grant continued...
Volleyball bests new ASUN rivals, grabs 5th straight win

Volleyball bests new ASUN rivals, grabs 5th straight win

The Lipscomb volleyball team beat the Eastern Kentucky Colonels 3-1 Sunday afternoon at Allen Arena. After starting the season with a 3-8 record, Lipscomb has now won five consecutive matches to improve to an even 8-8 on the year. As it has been for all five matches in the streak, defense was a strong point for the Bisons in the 4-set victory. Three Bisons finished with double-digit digs, including team-leading libero Delaney Smith with 16. “It starts with our scouting report,” Smith said. “Our coaches are great at setting us up where we’re supposed to be.” Head coach Brandon Rosenthal, on the other hand, passed the credit for the performance back to his players. “[I was] really pleased with our defense,” Rosenthal said. “I thought it was really, really stout.” “When you look at the numbers… it’s not about one, it’s about all six and doing that defensive job. I thought Smitty [Smith] was off the charts today. If you look at some of the nuances or the small plays she made today, she was really, really good.” Defensive specialist Libby Steinhardt, a freshman from Mt. Vernon, Indiana, earned 11 digs on the afternoon, giving her a new career high with Lipscomb. “I love the [other members of the team],” Steinhardt said. “The block really helped a lot, and it just felt great being able to play with everybody. I felt like we finally felt simple and played like us.” A back-and-forth first set laid the foundation for a fascinating encounter between two respected mid-major volleyball programs meeting for the first time as conference foes since 2006. The lead...
Kate Popova changing women’s tennis culture, leading by example

Kate Popova changing women’s tennis culture, leading by example

Kate Popova, Lipscomb women’s tennis co-captain since her junior year, has received many personal accomplishments and accolades since joining the team five years ago.  A native of Ukraine, Popova has played No. 1 in singles since she was a freshman, has had a winning record in ASUN play every year, and reached first-team All-ASUN status three times.  Popova gives credit to her team for helping her stay motivated and continue being a leader.  “I want to win at the end of the day, and I really want to win conference before I leave,” Popova said. “This team really works hard and keeps you motivated to get better every day.”  Women’s head coach Jamie Aid commends the leadership Popova has brought to the team and the dynamic that she has created within it.  “There’s a lot of standards that are more or less driven by the team, and our captains put that together,” Aid said. “We have a team full of girls from all over the world, and Kate has done a great job making the culture of the team feel like a family.”  Co-captain of the team Maddox Bandy also lives with Popova and considers her one of her best friends. Maddox has known Popova since she came to Lipscomb and has seen her leadership skills turn the team culture into what it is today.  “It’s awesome to be team captains with her, because she pulls her own weight, and is not overbearing in any way to any of the players,” Bandy said.  “She is also our No. 1 player on the team — which I think is really...
GALLERY: Students celebrate Salsa en el Square

GALLERY: Students celebrate Salsa en el Square

Students gathered Friday night in Bison Square for Salsa en el Square, a lively celebration of salsa dancing during Hispanic Heritage Month. A student instructor taught the groups several basic techniques. After the lesson, students got to show off their new skills with different partners. “I really enjoyed that there was enough structure there to show us what we were doing so we didn’t have to just … figure it out ourselves. … [The instructor] gave us ample amount of time to practice what she had taught us,” said JoAnna McCutcheon, a sophomore nutrition major from Southside, Alabama. Sarah Small, an IDEAL student from Zionsville, Indiana, added that the best part of the night was “learning new things.” Events like Salsa en el Square provide the opportunity for students to appreciate diverse cultural traditions and meet new friends in the Herd. “Everyone was there to have fun, everyone was there to dance, so … I liked going around and seeing who else didn’t have a partner and being like, ‘Hey! Let’s dance!’” said Anna Adams, a junior English major from Rogersville. “I think that was kind of always in my personality … but I think that the experience here [at Lipscomb] has kind of opened me up and opened that side of me.” Salsa en el Square was hosted by the Student Activities Board and Office of Intercultural Development and served as a continuation of events celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month. Photo Gallery by Cora Coletti Hayden Smith and Annie Duda...
GALLERY: Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returns for 2021

GALLERY: Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returns for 2021

The Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returned to The Park at Harlinsdale Farm in Franklin, Tennessee on September 25 and 26 after a yearlong hiatus. The festival, founded by Better Than Ezra frontman Kevin Griffin, hosted performances from artists such as local favorites Katie Pruitt and Cage the Elephant as well as bands such as Khruangbin and Dave Matthews Band. Check out the gallery below shot by Hannah Cron and read a recap of the weekend here.       Katie Pruitt « ‹ of 23 › »...
Gallery: Campus community memorializes 9/11

Gallery: Campus community memorializes 9/11

The Lipscomb Community gathered early Monday morning to memorialize lives lost on September 11, 2001. Students, faculty and new President Candice McQueen placed flags 2,977 flags (one for each life lost in the 9/11 attack) throughout Bison Square. Gallery by Abigail Kopp and Jack Roper.   Memorial flags on campus. Photo by Jack...
GALLERY: Presidential Convocation in photos

GALLERY: Presidential Convocation in photos

The Presidential convocation was held at the Gathering on Aug. 31. It was full of Lipscomb traditions such as the bagpipe quartet and traditional outfits for faculty. This year was different than usual since it the convocation included the transfer of presidents. Click through the photos below to see photos from the event. Photos courtesy of Cora Coletti and Jack...
Gallery: Students celebrate finishing the first week of classes with Retro Sno Cones

Gallery: Students celebrate finishing the first week of classes with Retro Sno Cones

Last Friday, to celebrate finishing the first week of classes, students were treated with Retro Sno Cones. The snow cone truck drove onto campus, right in front of Johnson Hall, making it difficult to miss as students came from classes or dorms. The truck attracted quite the crowd and created a great time for students to gather together and enjoy a cold summer treat on a hot...
Preview: Dove Awards to be held on campus next week

Preview: Dove Awards to be held on campus next week

The 52nd annual Dove Awards will take place next Tuesday in Allen Arena, featuring prominent Christian and Gospel musicians.  Hosting this year will be first-time host Jonathan McReynolds along with previous host, Natalie Grant, who are both Christian artists. The event took place online in 2020 because of the pandemic, and now as the event returns to in-person, the theme “Stronger Together” reflects this.  The event begins with a red carpet event with photos and interviews. Then the hosts take over to announce live performances and category winners.  The full list of nominees is posted to the Dove Awards’ website, with categories such as best song, artist and producer. Not only are there categories for Gospel and Contemporary Christian music, but the ceremony extends to genres such as Rap, Bluegrass, and Latino.  The Gospel Music Association, the Award’s producer, revealed the nominated artists that will be performing on Tuesday night. They include Lauren Daigle, Elevation Worship and Zach Williams.  Tickets are available ranging from $59 to $200. There are also tickets you can purchase for backstage access and artists’ meet and greets.  The event will take place on Oct. 19 starting at 6:30 p.m. and will be aired via TBN the following Friday at both 7 p.m. and 9 p.m....
HumanDocs participates in Lipscomb WOW Week

HumanDocs participates in Lipscomb WOW Week

HumanDocs brings stories that stir up critical thinking and conviction to the Lipscomb community. The series dives into different topics through film screenings and panel sessions. This week on the Lipscomb campus has been “Welcome to Our World Week”, which is a celebration and educational experience highlighting numerous countries around the world that make up the student body. HumanDocs worked in collaboration with the LIGHT Program and the Office of Intercultural Development for being a part of WOW Week and showed the documentary “And Then They Come For Us”. The film goes in depth about the tragic lock-up of Japanese Americans in internment camps during World War II. Traci Teraoka, daughter of internment survivor Tom Akira, was the panelist interviewed by students Ghia Gutierrez and Tracie Santiago who are involved with the Asian Connection club at Lipscomb. In a Q&A session, Teraoka elaborated on questions revolving around her father’s internment, how it affected her and her family, experiences with racism, and struggles with identity. Teraoka says “It’s interesting how people can take different art forms and ways of portraying life visually and either inspire us or use it against us”. Hosted through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, HumanDocs brings awareness to different issues and gives individuals the opportunity to gain consciousness to them. Photo via Lipscomb.edu, By Dorothea...
Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road gives 52nd Nashville Film Fest a musical start

Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road gives 52nd Nashville Film Fest a musical start

[Photo taken by Hannah Cron]   The 52nd Nashville Film Festival kicked off last Thursday with the red carpet premiere of the documentary Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road. The documentary, directed by Brent Wilson (no relation) and named after The Beach Boys’ 1971 hit, reflects on the long-lasting yet tumultuous career of legendary musician and Beach Boys co-founder Brian Wilson. “(Brian)’s one of the most important artists of the 20th century,” Wilson said.  “I mean when you list Beethoven, or you list Mozart or you list Picasso, you can very easily put Brian Wilson in that exact same category. And if you’re someone who loves art, if you’re someone who’s just affected deeply by any art form, Brian belongs in those categories.  I’ve always seen him that way — I see Brian as an artist, and not a pop musician — and that’s the way we approach the film, with that kind of perspective.” Brian Wilson: Long Promised Road is told through a myriad of never-before-seen archival footage and photos from Wilson’s past, multiple interviews with musicians influenced by Wilson from Bruce Springsteen to Nick Jonas, and intimate conversations between Wilson and his longtime friend, Rolling Stone editor Jason Fine. Various news outlets throughout the Nashville area, including Lumination Network, were present on the red carpet premiere, where the documentary’s director and Fine were present. Lumination also had a chance to speak with Wilson and Fine about Brian Wilson’s life outside of The Beach Boys and how those not familiar with his music could relate to the story of the film.  “Brian’s story is also a story of mental...
GALLERY: Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returns for 2021

GALLERY: Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returns for 2021

The Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returned to The Park at Harlinsdale Farm in Franklin, Tennessee on September 25 and 26 after a yearlong hiatus. The festival, founded by Better Than Ezra frontman Kevin Griffin, hosted performances from artists such as local favorites Katie Pruitt and Cage the Elephant as well as bands such as Khruangbin and Dave Matthews Band. Check out the gallery below shot by Hannah Cron and read a recap of the weekend here.       Katie Pruitt « ‹ of 23 › »...
Review: Pilgrimage Festival brings together great music and community

Review: Pilgrimage Festival brings together great music and community

Photo: Patrick Carney of The Black Keys at the 2021 Pilgrimage Festival, shot by Hannah Cron The first day back for Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival was an exciting day of great weather, excellent musicians, and the chance for a community to gather together for the first time in a long time.  The name “Pilgrimage” could not have felt truer as the day began with a mile-plus trek to the festival grounds. Some of the lucky ones bought parking passes through the festival, but for those like us, you better hope you had comfortable shoes.  Once waiting through security and ticket checkpoints we made it inside, where the festival was already alive with music and people. Most of the festival can be seen from the entrance.  To the right is the main stage where we would see The Black Keys, and the Gold Record Road Stage to the left where we saw Maren Morris that evening. The center is basically an epicenter for all things food, drink and shopping.  Of course, the first thing I checked out was the bathroom situation. There were several congregations of port-o-potties for those like us without VIP passes. They were in great condition when the day started but as more people arrived and the sun went down, they obviously did not stay that way.  I was fairly disappointed with the merchants as I saw too much tie-dye. Although I did not find anything I wanted, the shops stayed busy for most of the day.  Despite not being in the target demographic for the shopping, I definitely was for the music. The first two...