Lipscomb Academy moves to 3-2 trampling Franklin Road Academy 61-0.

Lipscomb Academy moves to 3-2 trampling Franklin Road Academy 61-0.

Lipscomb provides students with free flu shot

Lipscomb provides students with free flu shot

A year of severe weather events may point to the broader problem of climate change

A year of severe weather events may point to the broader problem of climate change

Lipscomb Postal Services deliver community to campus

Lipscomb Postal Services deliver community to campus

Lipscomb students affected by fires ravaging the West Coast

Lipscomb students affected by fires ravaging the West Coast

Lipscomb unveils the Lanier Center for Archaeology

Lipscomb unveils the Lanier Center for Archaeology


COVID-19 Tracker

Updated on Sep. 22 For more info visit the university COVID-19 Statistics page. This page will be updated every Monday with news and new statistics of Lipscombs COVID-19 status.  ...
A year of severe weather events may point to the broader problem of climate change

A year of severe weather events may point to the broader problem of climate change

So far, this year has consisted of a local tornado, wildfires burning up the west coast and the southeast facing an unprecedented number of hurricanes. However, extreme weather events like these are not predicted to disappear when the clock strikes midnight this new year’s, they just might be becoming the new normal. “Climate change is happening; we are seeing the effects now, and we can anticipate that the effects will continue into the future and likely become more severe,” said Emily Jones, Director of the Institute of Sustainable Practice at Lipscomb. Jones said, “What we know is that the Earth’s atmosphere moderates and plays a huge role in climate and that the earth does go through cycles of warmer and cooler periods based on a host of different factors,” “Carbon dioxide, methane and a handful of other manmade or human released substances in the atmosphere contribute to warming.” According to NASA, the planet’s average surface temperature has risen about 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.9 degrees Celsius) since the late 19th century. “This doesn’t mean that warming is equally spread out across the globe,” says Jones “Sometimes that means some places are wetter than usual or drier than they were historically… the phrase climate change is more broad than global warming because global warming is talking about one change to climate and climate change encompasses other changes like changes in weather patterns.” These changes in weather patterns are demonstrated by what’s been occurring this year. On the west coast, higher temperatures have dried out vegetation, creating the perfect breeding ground for massive wildfires and making them harder to contain. “With regard to hurricanes,...
Lipscomb Postal Services deliver community to campus

Lipscomb Postal Services deliver community to campus

In recent months, the United States Postal Service has found itself becoming deeply politicized ahead of November’s election. Amid a global pandemic, the USPS is critical in order to handle the expected record number of mail-in ballots. Last month, United States President Donald Trump expressed opposition to funding an additional $25 billion in aid to the postal service, citing fears over fraud from mail-in voting. Despite Washington battles, the bipartisan agency is still held in high regard with the public (a Pew Research survey in April found that 91% of Americans have a favorable view of the Postal Service). The USPS’s critical role takes shape in communities across the country, including here on Lipscomb’s campus. “The post office is a vital part to keeping us connected,” said Ronnie Farris, postmaster at the Lipscomb post office. Farris has been involved with the Lipscomb office for nearly 40 years, starting first as a student worker and evolving over time just as the postal service has. “You know, it’s just, it’s changed so much…I always have been asking this question, ‘what’s next?’ What is the next thing we need to be doing that we need to be aware of to serve our community?” These changes took shape this spring when coronavirus concerns shut down the campus. “We never closed. We were here…we still had packages coming in, we still have mail going out there, all these other functions were still happening.” Similar to other campus institutions, the postal office adapted by installing plexiglass to pick up windows, enacting mandatory temperature checks for employees, and using a whole bunch of hand sanitizer. “What we’re trying to do...
Lipscomb students affected by fires ravaging the West Coast

Lipscomb students affected by fires ravaging the West Coast

Lipscomb students, with families trying to survive the firestorm consuming the West Coast, anxiously await word from home while also watching news reports about the most-extensive wildfire carnage in history. The West Coast, from down near Los Angeles all the way up into Washington State, is on fire, forcing states of emergency to be declared in the big cities as wildfires incinerate whole towns, flames lick at the edges of urban areas and skies turn orange/yellow as fire and smoke pollution filters out the sun. “There’s really hazardous air quality, smoke everywhere, ash on all the cars,” said Sophie Corwin, a Lipscomb nursing major from Salem, Oregon. “My sister says it smells like a campfire no matter where you go and feels like you’re coughing up ash.” The flames are not the only safety concern for regions affected, air quality from smoke settling in valleys has created hazardous conditions that are only expected to worsen. The areas around Corwin’s hometown are under advisory for these conditions. “It’s tough, because I keep calling my family…. It’s hard to see everything being affected by it and just seeing pictures. It’s just completely insane. … I just like feel like I wish I could be there with them,” said Corwin.  “My family camps every year.… We had a reservation for this year but it got canceled for COVID, and so my grandpa hopped on (the computer) and made sure to get it for next year because we all wanted to go camping….  They emailed him and sent a refund because literally everything was destroyed,” Corwin said.  “It was terrible, I cried, and I was like, out...
Lipscomb unveils the Lanier Center for Archaeology

Lipscomb unveils the Lanier Center for Archaeology

While 2020 has brought many unforeseen changes to life at Lipscomb, it has also brought new beginnings. Later this fall, Lipscomb will celebrate the opening of the new Lanier Center for Archaeology. The Lanier Center comes to Lipscomb University from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Texas and brings with it two world-renowned biblical archaeology experts, Dr. Steven Ortiz and Dr. Tom Davis. “We thought it was a really great fit with our mission, being a Christian institution, having archaeology as part of that is really the evidence of what we’ve been reading about in the Bible and what we’ve been studying about. To really be able to dig into that, metaphorically and literally, is an exciting thing for us,” said Dr. Kim Chaudoin, assistant vice president of Public Relations and Communication. As a part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Lanier Center will offer master’s and doctorate degrees as well as a vast library of archaeological resources and artifacts. There are also plans to expand with an undergraduate program in the future. “Most of what we have is a study collection to be used by students. If you take an archaeology class with me, we are in the classroom, but we will also come to the Lanier Center and study the actual artifacts,” said Ortiz. Not only will there be new programs of study, but also opportunities for students to participate in archaeological digs. These trips will be open to all students, not just those studying archaeology. “We have trips all over the Middle East, mostly Israel and Cyprus. We have one project in Egypt, and...
Seven on campus test COVID-positive as fall semester begins

Seven on campus test COVID-positive as fall semester begins

Lipscomb’s weekly COVID tracker indicates that seven of the 56 people tested last week by the campus health center were positive cases. None resulted in hospitalization. The New York Times College Tracker reported Wednesday that Lipscomb has had 60 cases of COVID-19, though that number is a bit deceiving, according to a university spokesperson. The Times had not contacted Lipscomb for its numbers, Kim Chaudoin, assistant vice president, public relations and communications, told Lumination Network. “We do not have 60 active cases of COVID,” Chaudoin said. “Because colleges report data differently, and because cases continued to emerge, even in the months when most campuses were closed, the Times is counting all reported cases since the start of the pandemic.” Chaudoin said she updates the campus COVID stats each Monday morning. The current page states that 37 Lipscomb students are in quarantine/isolation. That figure does not refer to the number of positive COVID cases, Chaudoin said. “Nor should the 37 number be construed to assume positive cases,” she said. “It refers to the number of students in either isolation (they have tested positive) or quarantine (they have been exposed to someone who has tested positive).” She added that the number of positive tests recorded each week is a combined total that includes academic and university employees and students. Chaudoin said that of the Times‘ cumulative number of 60 positive cases, 48 of those were from March 25 through Aug. 8, and 31 of that number were outside vendors working on-site in May. The week of Aug. 8 had five positive cases; adding the current listing of seven brings the total to 60 since...
Lipscomb Academy moves to 3-2  trampling Franklin Road Academy 61-0.

Lipscomb Academy moves to 3-2 trampling Franklin Road Academy 61-0.

The Lipscomb Academy Mustangs took the field Friday night against the Franklin Road Academy Panthers in what was only the third game of the year for the Panthers. Overall, the Mustangs defeated the Panthers in a 61-0 win.  Coach Dilfer was very proud of his team for the win and how they’ve dealt with this unusual season. “I’m proud of them, I’m proud of their week of preparation, I’m proud of how they are handling the chaos in the world around them, and I’m proud of them buying in, every single day, to getting better.” The Mustangs came charging out of the gate with an emphasis on the run game and a touchdown on the first drive from Quarterback Luther Richesson. A forced fumble from Senior Zach Larkin lead to great field position and allowed Lipscomb to run in their second touchdown of the night for the early 13-0 lead. The Panthers seemed rattled after the first two drives and running back Jeffery Vercher was forced to take some time off the field with what appeared to be a tweaked ankle. With Vercher off the field, FRA opened up the passing game which resulted in an interception return for a touchdown by Safety Jaden Lyles of Lipscomb Academy. Despite Vercher returning, Lipscomb Academy continued to find the end zone. The Mustang defense wreaked havoc and provided great field position throughout the first half. Linebackers Eli Miller and Braeden Ford each forced a fumble and Running Back Alex Broome ran the ball for 3 touchdowns by the end of the second quarter, resulting in a 54-0 half-time lead for Lipscomb...
Lipscomb Academy falls to Brentwood Academy 29-19

Lipscomb Academy falls to Brentwood Academy 29-19

Lipscomb Academy football finally returned Friday night, but the weather and the outcome didn’t go as the Mustangs had desired. The visiting Mustangs fell to Brentwood Academy 29-19. Three minutes into the game, Mother Nature paid a little visit to Brentwood, resulting in a 30-minute lightning delay. Once given the all-clear, both sides were hoping for calmer weather for the remainder of the night, but once again lightning struck. After two lightning delays and an hour-and-a-half of waiting, the game resumed. Brentwood Academy drew first blood on a 23-yard touchdown run. Both sides were silent for the remainder of the half. With little action and a lot of punting on both sides, Brentwood Academy went into halftime with only a 7-3 lead. When the second half began and the rain cleared, both sides were able to focus more on their passing game. The Eagles struck once again early in the second with a four-yard touchdown run to increase the lead to 14-3. A couple of minutes later, a bad snap got away from Mustang quarterback Luther Richesson deep into the Eagles’ endzone, resulting in a safety. Later in the third quarter, a 59-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Tyler Monteil increased the Eagles’ lead to 22-3. Once the fourth quarter got underway, the Eagles saw their lead slowly begin to slip away, but the Mustang comeback was too little, too late. The Mustangs travel to Pope John Paul II High School next Friday...
Volleyball team relies on resilience after COVID pushes ASUN fall sports to spring

Volleyball team relies on resilience after COVID pushes ASUN fall sports to spring

Lipscomb volleyball head coach Brandon Rosenthal was being hopeful that a season on the brink of COVID extinction would be rescued when he was interviewed recently. Now that the season has been postponed —  the ASUN on Friday announced it was halting all fall sports because of the COVID epidemic and hoping to reschedule them for the spring — his and his players’ hopes have been dashed.  Or at least delayed. In the interview prior to Friday’s news, Rosenthal said being “resilient” is a key factor for the team because the pandemic already had thrown the games and even practice into an uproar. At the time, possibilities being tossed around included playing only in-conference or moving the season into the spring. In making Friday’s announcement, ASUN Commissioner Ted Gumbart, called it “a huge disappointment.” “Anyone who follows college sports understands the dynamics that brought us to this decision, but that doesn’t mean we like it. My feelings right now? COVID stinks. If you weren’t putting my words into a public release, I might put it another way.” The postponement of competition in conference-sponsored fall semester sports includes men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s soccer and volleyball. So far, the basketball seasons for men and women remain unaffected, at least in terms of scheduling games. Scheduling will be a big issue for the fall sports, though, now that they have to wait until spring, if the disease allows for play then. “We will make every effort to provide a quality competitive experience for our fall student-athletes during the spring semester,” Gumbart said in the conference press release. “We’re...
Men’s basketball team discovers new ways to connect during COVID-altered summer

Men’s basketball team discovers new ways to connect during COVID-altered summer

Staying in touch with his basketball team during this COVID summer has been so unpredictable and new that it’s been like “building the bridge as we go,” said coach Lennie Acuff, describing the frustrations and adaptations that have been necessary to try to get the team ready from a distance rather than the sidelines. “It’s just really been like nothing we’ve ever encountered,” said Acuff. “We work really hard to stay in contact with our guys. We do Zoom calls once a week with them, and then we are also trying to recruit, which has been really hard.” By this point in the summer, the upcoming year’s team has typically been together for over a month, living on campus in the month of June for summer classes, practices and basketball camp. But this year,  Acuff has not even been allowed to enter his office for almost four months. “Tomorrow’s going to be the first day we’re going to be allowed to go back to the office,” said Acuff on Tuesday, July 30. “So we’ve been doing everything remotely. It is for sure something we’ve never experienced, and I hope and pray we never have to again.” Coaches and staff already face challenges to stay connected virtually with the returning players. It is a more difficult task when it comes to the incoming players, according to Acuff. “It’s hard — really, really, really hard. I think that there’s only so much you can do on the phone,” said Acuff. “We signed two kids early in November that we know really well: Tommy Murr and Will Pruitt. “We know them well...
Lipscomb men’s soccer 2020 signing class could boost ‘attacking’ force

Lipscomb men’s soccer 2020 signing class could boost ‘attacking’ force

Lipscomb men’s soccer has announced a new roster for the coming season, and the eyes of the coach were focused on ability to attack offensively. “We’ve historically been known as a team that has a really potent offense and some really dynamic attacking pieces,” said head coach Charles Morrow. The coaches were looking for more of that attacking force with this signing class, with high hopes to improve that sting in their offense. “In addition to filling some key positions like Ben Loche as our holding midfielder, that we lost last year, really the focus of this group was finding attacking players that could give us more of a threat in the attack and scoring goals,” said Morrow. “We’re really happy with the group that we got and the quality they bring as players and really excited with the quality of people that we’re seeing so far,” said Morrow. Here is more on the signing class and some of their notable achievements. Gerik Jakubowksi is a forward from Phoenix, Arizona. 1st-Team All-Region at Sunnyslope High School. He Led TSV Allershausen in assists, second in goals for a season. Won U16 State Cup Championship with Real Salt Lake AZ  and he will be joining his brother Zarek Jakubowksi, an upcoming junior, on the Bisons roster. Austin Marfell is a winger from Warner Robins, Georgia. He is a first-team advanced to ECNL National Championship Final and a Team MVP for Houston County High School. Marfell is a two-year team captain and won the regional championship with HCHS. Marlon Grossman is a forward from Schwaebisch Gmueno, Germany. Grossman made 26 appearances in...
Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb’s 129th graduation ceremony looked quite different than was expected when the school year began in August. Allen Arena, which typically hosts the celebratory event, sat empty on Saturday when the COVID-19 outbreak forced the university to host its first virtual graduation. From the charge to the alma mater, Lipscomb faculty and students combined live and pre-recorded clips to create an all-new commencement ceremony experience. President Randy Lowry opened the commencement ceremony with a video pre-recorded in Allen Arena. “Well this isn’t exactly like I imagined it,” Lowry said. “Here I am standing in Allen Arena, and if this was a normal moment: Students you would be here with me. You would be dressed in caps and gowns, and there would be five thousand people surrounding us as this amazing moment took place. We would march in, we’d hear the bagpipes; the faculty would follow a little bit later. You’d be on the stage walking across, I’d shake your hand, and you would have your college degree, your graduate degree. You would have completed this moment, and the celebration would be wonderful. “The reality is we all know that this is a different time. And we’re giving up something:We’re giving our Allen Arena moment in order to protect others,” said  Lowry. One of the many faculty members joining  Lowry in conducting the online ceremony, Dean of Community Life Prentice Ashford gave out the Stephen Marsh Award. “Steve was a 1977 Lipscomb graduate and the son of one of our former board members, Lee Marsh,” said Ashford. “He was a Christian example in every aspect of his life as a...
Lipscomb Full Moon Festival raises $6,700 for YES Mission

Lipscomb Full Moon Festival raises $6,700 for YES Mission

Lipscomb clubs, Delta Omega and Theta Psi host the Full Moon Festival each spring semester to raise money for a different mission. This year the clubs raised $6,700 for “The Mission of Youth Encouragement Services (YES).” The mission of yes is to “enrich the lives of children in Inner City Nashville, helping them to develop academically, physically, spiritually and socially.” The event functions as a philanthropy event but also united the student body through music. Throughout the evening, from 6 pm till 9 pm, students perform high-end karaoke with a live band and singing songs they have rehearsed. There is dancing, fun, and music all geared around a 50’s theme. The event is essentially a sock-hop playing current music mixed with old hits.   Riley Hoag captured a gallery of the event here. ...
Career-highs lead the Bisons past Kennesaw State in 73-85 win

Career-highs lead the Bisons past Kennesaw State in 73-85 win

The Lipscomb Bisons opened there 2020 home slate on Thursday night hosting ASUN opponent, Kennesaw State in their third conference game of the year. Despite a late comeback attempt by the Owls, the Bisons were able to pull away with a 73-85 victory behind senior guard Michael Buckland’s career-high 25 points and redshirt sophomore center Ahsan Asadullah’s career-high 28 points. “For about 34 minutes, I thought we played really, really well – some of our best play offensively. We went 13-26 from the 3-point line; the reason we did that is that we moved the ball,” said Lipscomb head coach Lennie Acuff. The two teams played competitively for much of the first half with both sides going on scoring runs, however, it was the Bisons who went into halftime with the lead 31-39, due to several key defensive stops. “I can come in as a senior and demand that defensive mentality from the younger guys. Because that’s where we are going to get conference wins,” Buckland said. “We are going to get scouted, offense is going to be stagnant at times, and so when it does get stagnant you have to be able to make stops on the defensive end.” Coming out of the half, Lipscomb got off to a hot start and began to take control of the game, leading by 20 points with 10 minutes remaining in the game. But, Kennesaw State refused to go home quietly.  “Our problem this year has been that we will have little lulls, and we have to learn to eliminate those lulls,” Buckland said. This lull cost the Bisons’ their large...
A hard loss for Bisons Basketball in 146th Battle of the Boulevard

A hard loss for Bisons Basketball in 146th Battle of the Boulevard

The Bisons took another hard loss to the Bruins in the second installment of the Battle of the Boulevard this season. The final from the Curb Event Center was 80-75. “We’re sitting at 3 in 6 and that’s not where we wanna be,” Head Coach Lennie Acuff said. “But there’s probably not many people at our level playing the schedule we play, and so we just need to keep getting better.” The team won two road games over the last week and a half against Navy and Tennessee Tech, and they also hung in for the majority of the Xavier game, despite being without three of their starters. Michaell Buckland, Jake Wolfe and Greg Jones have sat the bench until tonight, due to injuries suffered in the first matchup against Belmont last month. “It helped getting a couple of guys back tonight that have been out for a couple of weeks,” Coach Acuff said. This, the 146th installment of the Battle of the Boulevard, was a Battle as always. The score stayed tight until the middle of the second half when the Bruins began to knock down shot after shot gaining a 13 point lead on the Bisons. Belmont’s freshman guard Adam Kunkel got on a hot streak shooting and got the Bruins score up to 71-58 on the Bisons with 2:42 left in the second half. “The thing I think he’s gotten better at is, he’s not a catch-and-shoot guy. He’s obviously a really good shooter, but he’s got game, he can put it down… he’s much more athletic than you think.” Coach Acuff said about Adam Kunkel....
GALLERY: Lady Women’s Basketball takes on Eastern Illinois

GALLERY: Lady Women’s Basketball takes on Eastern Illinois

Coming off two straight losses during the ASUN-MAAC challenge last weekend, Lipscomb was looking to bounce back at home against the Eastern Illinois Panthers Sunday afternoon. Without starting sophomore center Dorie Harrison and starting junior guard Sydney Shelton — the Bisons had quite a challenge.giving their leading scorer, freshman guard Jalyn Holcomb, a supporting cast. Much of the first half was controlled by the Panthers’ disruptive offense in the paint, behind 6’1” sophomore center Abby Wahl’s 12 first-half points. For the Bisons, junior forward Taylor Clark and senior forward Emily Kmec both got into early foul trouble, which aided in EIU’s success down low....