Lipscomb sets record in diversity numbers

Lipscomb sets record in diversity numbers

For years, Nashville has been called a “melting pot” due to its diverse citizens. Going into the 2016-17 school year, Lipscomb can share that claim with its most diverse student body to date. Lipscomb now has a student body in which nearly one-fourth of all students come from a diverse background. That student body includes students from 49 states and 47 different countries. Lipscomb’s Director of Intercultural Development Lisa Steele has helped in the school’s effort to grow the rate of diversity on campus. “It has definitely been a conscious effort,” Steele said. “We have grown 350 percent since 2005. Every year our diversity numbers have grown.” Nashville, where one out of every ten citizens comes from a diverse background, attracts diversity due to the many opportunities that can be found in the city. Similarly, Lipscomb attracts many as students from diverse backgrounds are not only given opportunities but are also helped every step of the way. Steele thinks it speaks volumes about the school as a whole to be a place where these students want to come. “We are not just wanting students here, but are also willing to support them with services,” Steele said. “A lot of universities bring these students to campus, but then they’re on their own. Here we supply them with encouragement, advocate and support them.” Included in those different opportunities is the various on-campus organizations that have been started to help international and students from diverse backgrounds connect with each other. Senior political science student Carlos Ruiz Oyala is the current president and co-founder of Lipscomb’s chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens...
Lipscomb volleyball falls to Kennesaw State

Lipscomb volleyball falls to Kennesaw State

Although the energy was high in Allen Arena Friday night, the volleyball team ran out of gas while battling rival Kennesaw State. The atmosphere was alive with all of Greek life there, a live DJ from the Rio Olympics and a well-known color commentator, also from the Rio Olympics. The Lady Bisons came out hot in the first match, gaining a quick 7-0 lead. They carried their momentum all the way to the end, where they defeated Kennesaw State 25-14. “We have a budding rivalry with Kennesaw. We knocked them out of championship game last year, and they are continuing to push the envelope as far as our conference goes.” said Coach Brandon Rosenthal. The second match, however, was a different story. Both teams were neck-and-neck as the lead kept changing, constantly. The Owls had the lead until senior transfer Taylor Racich took control of the net and slammed two balls down the middle of the court. Unfortunately for Lipscomb, our defense had trouble keeping the lead due to their delayed reactions to the quick Kennesaw State offense. Junior Lauren Anderson kept fighting and putting the Bisons back in the lead. A major key from this match that hurt the Lady Bisons was the struggle to control their blocking on the net and to keep the ball in bounds. Lipscomb also gave away some easy points by serving the ball out of bounds. Racich and freshman Carlyle Nusbaum came to play, slamming two balls off the block to put Lipscomb ahead 17-16. Some miscommunication hurt the Lady Bisons and caused a few balls to drop right in the middle of the...
Morality and the Media offers discourse on hot topics for student journalists

Morality and the Media offers discourse on hot topics for student journalists

Story by Katie Bianchini and Becca Risley The Lipscomb Department of Communication and Journalism presented the second annual Morality and the Media conference held Friday in the Ezell building. Speakers engaged students in a variety of controversial topics such as youth violence, transgender policy and civility in public discourse. “Hearing from professionals in the field can prove to be invaluable,” junior Reese Lusk said. “Gaining wisdom from people that are currently doing what we want to do is an amazing opportunity.” Chair of the Department of Communication and Journalism Alan Griggs said he hoped the day would allow students to gain insight into the world of communication through professionals. “We really wanted to explore not only the issues, but how the media cover those issues from the viewpoint and perspective of working journalists and those who have been in journalism,” Griggs said. “There isn’t enough time given for a good, broad discussion of these topics from the perspective that we bring.” One panel discussed the ongoing, national issue of transgender bathroom usage and equal access to secure public places. A main focus of this panel was the concept of privacy for the transgender population and how journalists should navigate reporting on such sensitive matters. “There is no documentation of transgender people going into the bathroom and harassing people,” said Dr. Marisa Richmond of the Tennessee Transgender Political Coalition. “But we have tons of documentation of transgender people going into bathrooms and being harassed.” Another panelist, Zach Pruitt of the Family Action Council of Tennessee, argued that “the rights of some come at the expense of others,” saying that regardless of documentation, women should not be in...
‘Queen of Katwe’ inspires with true story of chess prodigy

‘Queen of Katwe’ inspires with true story of chess prodigy

“Queen of Katwe” tells the inspiring true story of chess-prodigy Phiona Mutesi’s rise from poverty in Katwe, Uganda, to become one of the greatest chess masters in the world. The film begins with 10-year-old Phiona (newcomer Madina Nalwanga) going about her daily life by selling corn in the “slums” of Uganda. Her father tragically died recently, so her mother (Lupita Nyong’o) is left to raise four children alone. The Mutesi’s don’t have an easy time — the oldest child runs off with a “bad guy,” they’re evicted from their home, a storm floods their new house, etc. Through Robert Katende (David Oyelowo) — the soccer player turned missionary — Phiona discovers the game of chess. While chess becomes a great resource on which Phiona can focus her energy and high intelligence, it does not solve all her problems; the film does an excellent job of showing that an escape from poverty is not an easy transition. “Queen of Katwe” was shot on location in Uganda, providing an honest look at Mutesi’s childhood home, and all the colors in the film are especially vivid and beautiful. The majority of the film’s actors are Kenyan. Be sure to stick around for the credits to see them interact with their environment; viewers will get to see the actors stand beside their real-life counterparts at the film’s conclusion. Nyong’o delivers the best performance, portraying an incredibly complex character with skill and emotion. Phiona’s mother is strong, yet she needs her older children’s help so that they can pay their rent and have food at night; therefore, she struggles with Phiona’s running off to play chess. The film...
‘The Magnificent 7’ delivers action-packed western story

‘The Magnificent 7’ delivers action-packed western story

Fast paced, gun-slinging action and a formula too familiar, The Magnificent 7 packs some punch (and some dynamite) into two hours of non-stop action. Antoine Fuqua (Training Day) collaborates with Denzel Washington and Ethan Hawke for a journey back to Wild West. The stage is set in the first few scenes as the town of Rose Creek is under the control of a ruthless industrialist named Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard). The opening sequence takes place in a church where Bogue establishes his character’s ruthlessness, as he takes the men out and kills half a dozen of them and sets the church ablaze. That is when Emma Cullen (Haley Bennett) and Teddy Q (Luke Grimes) set out to unite the seven, as Cullen also seeks revenge. Each member of the seven is introduced western-style by killing someone in dramatic fashion. Chisolm, a very matter-a-fact warrant officer played by Denzel Washington, clears a saloon single handily. Chris Pratt’s character Josh Faraday, is introduced as a wise-cracking, trickster who’s good with a deck of cards. Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo) is a sharpshooting ‘Texican.’ Goodnight Robincheaux (Ethan Hawke), a legendary Confederate marksman and Billy Rocks (Byung-hun Lee), a knife-wielding, ninja-like sidekick come as a package. Next up is the gentle giant known as Jack Horne (Vincent D’Onofrio). After a night in a canyon, an Indian ambush seems inevitable, but instead the soft-spoken Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier) becomes the seventh member. The Magnificent 7 makes each introduction very unique and specific to the character. Each violent introduction gives the character personality without the need for much dialogue, and that is a strength of the movie. The first time...