X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: getting hit

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: getting hit

So we lost week one in horrifying fashion. We left several points on the field, and Centennial scored 14 points in the final 72 seconds to win. It was definitely not the opening anyone would want. Their quarterback finished 9-25, and most of those completions came on the final two drives. I had a big “hoorah” blog lined up in my head for if we had won, but I wasn’t able to write it. For a moment, I questioned doing this. Is this really something I wanted to do? Do I really like football this much to go through everything we did simply to lose like that? Sunday rolled around, and we put it behind us. It happened. It’s over. Time to regroup. It made me sick the rest of the week, but, in a way, I loved that. I loved that I finally had some drive in me. It didn’t matter what happened because we are a team. We lost as a team. Everyone has to get better. Tuesday we had the best defensive practice I think I have seen. Offensively, our line was beginning to gel. Going into Riverdale, no one gave us a chance. Riverdale is full of athletes and extremely talented skill-guys. But we were prepared. Riverdale features many of the top recruits in the state such as safety Gentry Bonds, who committed to Georgia Tech. We put up 21 unanswered points, but they began to trickle back into the game little by little. We fumbled at the 1-yard line right before we could have scored. Those thoughts from the week prior against Centennial came...
Bisons use strong second half to put away FAU in season opener

Bisons use strong second half to put away FAU in season opener

Lipscomb Men’s Soccer (1-0) opened the season with a new conference logo, new jersey design and a win over Florida Atlantic University (0-1) on Friday night at the Lipscomb soccer complex. “I thought it was a great start for the season,” head coach Charles Morrow said. “We’re still nursing some injuries from the preseason, but I thought the guys that played tonight all looked good.” Ivan Alvarado, the ASUN Preseason Player of the Year, did not play, but that did not stop the Bison’s from putting in a collective effort. Logan Paynter shot a volley from the 18 yard box in the 18th minute, but FAU keeper Philip Hitpass made a leaping save. The shot was one of 10 the Bisons had for the night. The ASUN Preseason Goalkeeper of the Year, Micah Bledsoe, came up with a diving save after a defensive breakdown in the 24th minute. Both teams had limited chances in the first half, with the defenses controlling the tempo and keeping the respective offense in check, resulting in a 0-0 halftime score. “We were playing a team that, defensively, puts a lot of numbers back,” Morrow said. “They can lull you into putting too many numbers forward, and they can hurt you on a counterattack.” However, the Lipscomb offense started hitting its stride in the second half. The Bisons’ first goal of the season was a van-Persie-esque diving finish by junior Scout Monteith off of a set piece, giving Lipscomb a 1-0 lead. The assist was delivered from last season’s leading scorer, Logan Paynter. “I thought our guys did a good job of being patient...
IDEAL Program adds residential component

IDEAL Program adds residential component

The IDEAL Program, previously a non-residential certificate program, added a residential component for the first time this year. This fall, Jason Rogers and Bo Hoskins moved in to Sewell Hall as the first non-commuter IDEAL students. “We want our students to be fully included in the campus experience,” Kelly Blankenship, IDEAL’s Program Coordinator, said. “This program allows them to be fully immersed in campus life, and that is our dream for all our students. We want everyone to get the same benefits and opportunities without exclusion.” The TPSID Grant helped with funding to make the residential component of the program possible. Other changes to the IDEAL program included adding an optional third year for students to complete, a trial experience in the summer for prospective IDEAL students and expanded community involvement for the current students to participate in. Lipscomb was one of 25 schools to receive the grant, and it has allowed IDEAL to hire Residential Coordinator Samuel Hutchins who will act as a liaison between IDEAL and residential life. “With the extra money we received, we will be able to provide extra support,”  Blankenship said, speaking of the changes being made this school year. IDEAL has a tentative goal to add two new residential students each year. The new roommates, Rogers and Hoskins, said they are both excited about their move to residential life. They noted that although move-in day was stressful, it was definitely worth it. The two students also said they are excited to get to know more people outside the IDEAL Program and be a more active part of campus life. “These might be the...
‘The Joshua Project’ kicks off 2016 program with guest speaker Gabe Lyons

‘The Joshua Project’ kicks off 2016 program with guest speaker Gabe Lyons

The Joshua Project program launched the 2016-2017 school year with Christian conversation and Baja Burrito in Collins Alumni Auditorium, followed by dinner in Shamblin Theater Tuesday night. Program director Cyrus Eaton, along with Gabe Lyons — author of GOOD FAITH and founder of Q ideas — spoke to students about the value of having and being a spiritual mentor. “This is a really cool opportunity for you all to hear from those who have been deeply influenced by those before them, and they’re using those friendships with those men and women to influence the masses,” Eaton said, as he started the night off with details of The Joshua Project’s fundamentals and introduced the night’s guest speaker, Lyons. The Joshua Project’s mission is: “To connect members of the Lipscomb family in spiritual mentoring relationships that equip the participants to grow in love, devotion, and service to Jesus, His body of believers, and His Kingdom.” Eaton went on to discuss different aspects of the program’s function, such as the three core pillars of the program — Jesus-Centered, Two-Sided Investment and Simplicity. During the kickoff, Lyons focused on  how Americans view the concept of faith and religion and shared his insights upon the matter, specifically bringing in data to illustrate the theme of “irrelevance” in the American culture. “There’s a general sense that it [religion] doesn’t really matter that much,” Lyons said. “Approximately 47% of millennials say they are afraid to speak up about their faith. Almost 60% say they feel marginalized in social relationships about sharing what they really believe. “I’m sure there’s people in this room, including myself, that have had that...
Letter from the Editor

Letter from the Editor

Hello, fellow Bisons! With school starting back this Monday (I know — I can’t believe it either!), I thought I would introduce myself. My name is Erin Franklin, and, as you may have noticed, I assumed the role of Editor-in-Chief of Lumination this past summer. The position was previously held by the very talented Erin Turner, and I am honored to follow in her footsteps. I’m an incoming sophomore and a Journalism and New Media major. I hail from Mount Juliet, Tennessee –for those of you not from this area, MJ is a town  just east of Nashville. As editor, I’m looking forward to the growth of this web site, and I hope to continue to build the site into something that all students, alums, faculty and parents read each day. Something I particularly hope to do is bring world-news stories with a Lipscomb focus to Lumination. I most certainly couldn’t do it alone, though! We have many talented students contributing to Lumination this year: Becca Risley and Anna Rogers, two very accomplished writers and photographers, are our two Managing Editors. KJ Lauck and Lindsey Nance are bringing their sports expertise to the staff as our Sports Editor and Assistant Sports Editor, respectively. Jade Spilka will keep you updated in the world of entertainment as our Arts and Entertainment Editor. Ben Davis, along with his trusty camera, is back as our Chief Photographer. Daniel Johnson is taking care of all of the complicated tech stuff as our Web Developer. We also have many more gifted writers and photographers on the Lumination staff. With Lumination radio, Anna McClure will continue to be...
Lipscomb Missions won’t halt trips because of Zika virus

Lipscomb Missions won’t halt trips because of Zika virus

A hot topic of 2016, the Zika virus outbreak has caused a state of health emergency in many countries, but the Zika threat is not stopping Lipscomb Missions. Erin Gupton, Event Planner and Trip Coordinator for the missions department on campus, discussed the possible affects of traveling to a country with a rampant Zika virus and also some preventative actions for students who do decide to travel on mission trips where catching the Zika virus is a possibility. She participated in a seminar about Zika early this year when it first became a bigger threat. Gupton said she doesn’t expect there to be a decrease of students traveling on mission trips to countries because of the virus. “We have a lot of questions — more-so than a decrease in student numbers, necessarily; I don’t think we had anyone drop from the trip because of it,” Gupton said. Zika is not a new virus as it was first documented pre-1950s. However, a recent widespread outbreak has led some countries to issue travel warnings, which could negatively affect the tourism industry. Some countries, including Brazil, the site of the 2016 Olympics, have gone as far as to advise couples to delay pregnancies until more is known about the complications of the virus in connection with pregnant women and their fetuses. “Zika has been around since the 1940s; it’s not new, and at these locations that we go to, especially the Caribbean, there’s two other diseases you can get from mosquitoes that are pretty prominent,” Gupton noted, citing that diseases dengue and chikungunya are as prominent as Zika. “The symptoms for those...