Weekly Gathering announces new partnership with Coca-Cola

Weekly Gathering announces new partnership with Coca-Cola

After several years under contract with Pepsi, Lipscomb is now a “Coca-Cola campus” as announced this Tuesday during the Gathering in Allen Arena. James Franklin III serves as the CEO for the bottling company and spoke to the student body about his commitment to Lipscomb. After he showed a video highlighting his son, James Baak, and his trip to South Sudan, he invited the Coca-Cola Polar Bear to the stage alongside Vice President of Student Life Josh Roberts. Together they told the crowd about the several Coca-Cola sponsored events happening on campus soon. Baak is the founder of SMARD, Solidarity Ministries Africa for Reconciliation and Development. SMARD’s mission is to empower women and children of South Sudan by educating them and giving them the freedom to find confidence in themselves. Born and raised in South Sudan, Baak dealt with great turmoil as a young boy and told the story of how he had to flee to Ethiopia. “The travel in length was Nashville to Denver,” he said. At first, Baak wished to return home. However, it was after a dream featuring a man in white clothing, giving him a bible and telling him to fight onward that he found Christ. After gaining an education and becoming a pastor, Baak went back to his home country of South Sudan and planted a church while helping other churches there reach their maximum potential. He said he hopes that his mission will continue to touch others and raise awareness surrounding the women and children of South...
Actress Tisha Campbell-Martin offers insight into life as a Christian actress

Actress Tisha Campbell-Martin offers insight into life as a Christian actress

“My grandmother always told me I have to be extraordinary to be considered average,” Actress Tisha Campbell-Martin told the audience in Collins Alumni Auditorium on Monday evening. “You have to be able to do it all to be great.” Campbell-Martin shared many empowering statements like this during her conversation with guest moderator Shannon Sanders, and she seems to have followed her grandmother’s advice. The multi-hyphenated actress and singer came to speak for The George Shinn College of Entertainment and the Arts presented Actress Insights: A Conversation with Tisha Campbell-Martin. The hour and a half event offered Lipscomb students, faculty and the general public an intimate look into the life of the multi-hyphenated actress and singer. Campbell-Martin, who has been in shows such as My Wife and Kids, Martin and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, had many stories to share over her four-decade long career, starting from the very beginning of it all. She talked about how she got her foot in the door with singing and acting and the moment she realized she wanted to make a career out of it, all starting with a singing competition she entered at age five. Her only goal was to win the second prize in the competition, which was a color TV. “At first, I was mad when I didn’t win second prize,” Campbell-Martin laughed, “Instead I won first prize which was a car. But then, I saw my mother crying and my father jumping up and down, and that was the moment I knew I could help people.” She said she realized then what she was supposed to do as an artist and wanted to make helping people...
Media Masters invites speaker to address race communication and bias

Media Masters invites speaker to address race communication and bias

For the first Media Masters of the semester, Robert A. Jackson, Jr. discussed race communications as well as bias in the Lipscomb community and the media with communication students Monday night in Ezell. Jackson started off the evening by addressing “the elephant in the room” before offering his advice to students and faculty in regards to their future vocation. Last Thursday, Lipscomb president Randy Lowry invited African American students over to his home to discuss their unique experiences on campus. Stalks of cotton were featured as the table centerpiece and “soul food” was served to the students. Several students took issue with this. “Some are wondering if I would speak about the cotton incident last week,” Jackson said. “The answer is ‘yes.’ I have read multiple comments from multiple venues. I have looked at it from several angles.” Jackson went on to discuss how there was much more to this story than “just cotton stalks and soul food.” “There is a suspending issue that is at the center of the problem,” he said. “The situation could have been handled better and concerns from the African American community are being addressed with the president.” Jackson describes himself as a “bridge-builder” for many communities and groups of people to come together. “We have to build a bridge because this chasm is very deep; it is very vast and it is very wide,” he said. To continue, Jackson spoke a reminder to students and faculty that actions and words should exist hand-in-hand. “If we are not looking to help other people rise, then we can forget about what we call religion, because they...
President Lowry issues apology for ‘offensive’ decorations at dinner for African-American students

President Lowry issues apology for ‘offensive’ decorations at dinner for African-American students

President Randy Lowry issued a campus-wide apology for featuring cotton stalk centerpieces at a dinner for African-American students. The dinner was hosted at his home on Thursday evening. One student attendee posted an Instagram photo of the centerpieces and a video of another student asking the university president why the tables were decorated with cotton. “I have no idea,” Lowry said offscreen. The dinner was intended to give African-American students at the university an opportunity to discuss their unique experiences on campus. Lipscomb’s campus is 77% white, according to the Office of Intercultural Development. Assistant Dean and Director of Intercultural Development Lisa Steele said that the dinner was Lowry’s idea and that it has been in the works since Quest Week. Steele was not immediately available for further comment. Some students took issue with the menu, saying the buffet of barbecued chicken, collard greens and cornbread further played into African-American stereotypes. Hispanic students were served fajitas at a similar event on Wednesday evening. “They were trying to make us comfortable, but it blew up in their face,” said LeBron Hill, a Lumination News reporter who attended the dinner. Hill said he didn’t believe Lowry was racist, but that the situation was “insensitive.” “I thought it was ignorant,” Hill said. The university does not currently have a Coordinator of African-American Student Services. In his apology, emailed Friday, Lowry acknowledged that the centerpieces were “offensive” and that he “could have handled the situation with more sensitivity.” “I sincerely apologize for the discomfort, anger or disappointment we caused and solicit your forgiveness,” Lowry said. “I welcome the opportunity to continue this conversation,” the...
Lipscomb students turn out to help Hurricane Relief efforts

Lipscomb students turn out to help Hurricane Relief efforts

Lipscomb students came out in force to the Hurricane Relief interest meeting, expressing a desire to volunteer with relief efforts for recent hurricanes, Harvey and Irma. When Hurricane Harvey crashed into the Houston area on August 25 leaving destruction in its wake, many students began asking what they could do to help residents pick up the pieces from the disaster. Then, when Irma hit the coast of Florida on September 10, it added to the devastation and caused an even greater need for support and assistance for those who had been in the hurricanes’ paths. Fortunately, Lipscomb students’ motivation to help grew as well. Missions Coordinator Joshua Self said that the idea of coordinating the trips actually started with the students. “Numerous students reached out to our office immediately and asked whether we would be organizing trips.” Self said. “Our wheels began to turn in thinking about how to coordinate relief teams, drawing upon previous relief efforts in Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina.” From there, the Missions team began to meet with the Office of Church Services to figure out where students could provide the most help for those impacted by the storms. Over 250 students have since expressed a desire to help out with the relief trips. Senior Mackenzie Lewis is one of those students and said she hopes and plans to go and help out. “I have felt really convicted this semester,” Lewis said, “that part of my mission as a Christian is to serve others to the best of my ability through my time, resources and actions. When the opportunity presented itself during chapel, I realized this...
Lipscomb students safe after London terror attack

Lipscomb students safe after London terror attack

Fortunately for the Lipscomb community, all 11 students that recently traveled to London are safe and accounted for, per university President Randy Lowry via an email statement sent to faculty and staff on Friday. London is reeling after a bombing at the Parsons Green Underground Station yesterday — Britain’s fifth terror incident this year. 29 people were injured in the attack, but according to the BBC, none appear to be life-threatening. The “Lipscomb in London” group was on a train to Edinburgh, Scotland, at the time of the attack. Lowry also noted that Parsons Green is on the opposite side of town from where the group is housed in Islington. “The incident occurred nearly an hour’s commute away from where the ‘Lipscomb in London’ students reside during the semester-long program,” Lowry said. “We have been in contact with families to assure them of their child’s safety.” Robyn Shannon, a sophomore from Hendersonville, said the group was initially shocked to hear the news, as they had spent Thursday in Notting Hill, which is also located in West London. However, the incident is not stopping Shannon and her classmates from getting the most of their stay in the English capital. “We still feel safe enough to travel within London,” Shannon said. “We know this could happen anywhere, and we don’t want fear to stop us from experiencing a different culture.” Ally Whiting, a sophomore from Colorado Springs, Colorado, said their distance from the attack also helped to ease nerves – including those of family and friends. “The distance has helped us all react calmly to (the bombing),” Whiting said. “There wasn’t...