Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

Modern-day technology comes to life in Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman’s thriller Nerve. High school senior Vee Delmonico (Emma Roberts) is tired of living in the shadow of her best friend Sydney (Emily Meade). However, this all changes when Sydney introduces Vee to Nerve, an online reality game similar to truth or dare. Nerve is divided into two categories: watchers and players. Players are dared by the watchers to perform and film embarrassing or dangerous tasks. The only way out for the players is to succeed, bail or fail. Vee decides to try Nerve and is immediately dared to kiss a stranger. This dare leads her into an exciting partnership with fearless veteran player Ian (Dave Franco). Vee and Ian’s partnership quickly becomes popular among the watchers, but as their popularity increases, their dares only become harder. Soon, Vee and Ian find themselves in the top 10 of all Nerve players, thanks to a series of difficult dares, but it all quickly becomes too much for Vee. Freaked out by the intensity of the game, she reports the game to a police officer — going against the only rule Nerve enforces. Vee is now seen as a “snitch” to the watchers, and she is deemed a prisoner while all the money is taken out of her family’s bank account. The only way to win back her money and freedom is to win the entire game. Once she learns that Ian, too, is a prisoner, Vee sets out to win Nerve, but it may not be in the way the watchers expect. I am usually not a fan of thrillers...
X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

As Coach Carpenter, one of my main responsibilities is “coaching up” the freshman players. The first day we were on the field with them, Coach Webb huddled up the skill players and asked, “Who here is a quarterback?” No one raised their hand. He kind of snickered to himself and said, “All right, well, who here would call themselves a quarterback.” Finally two guys raised their hands. Ian and Josh. In eighth grade the year before, Josh was the starting quarterback and Ian was the backup. Coach Winfree and I went through fundamentals with them — quick catch and throw, three step drops, basic follow throughs on release and how to grip the ball — basic things just to get those kids warmed up. After so much fundamental work, we went to work with the wide receiver groups. We had them throw slants, hitches and seams — simple routes that will be incorporated in their growth. Holy cow were we impressed with them. They were young with a lot of talent, but Coach Winfree called them “coachable.” I thought that was the perfect way to describe them. The act of being coachable is very important. If you aren’t coachable we can’t help you. Coachability is the willingness to be corrected and to act on that correction. It’s humility. It’s being able to realize that you need the guidance of others to be better. In a way, I have had to be coachable the past two months as well — primarily because of how raw of a coach I am. I’ve sat to the side watching these coaches coach up...
Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Lipscomb’s Madi Talbert came up just short in the Olympic Trials for the 300m steeplechase on Monday, July 4th. Talbert was named as one of the 35 best runners in the country and competed for a spot in the 2016 Summer Olympics, which will be held in Rio de Janeiro. Talbert qualified for the trials by running a personal best 9:50.57 in the 2015 NCAA Division I East Region Prelims, which was the fourth best time in the nation from the East Region and West Region Prelims combined. At the Olympic Trials, she came in 29th with a time of 10:09.76. The top 14 qualified for the Olympic games. “It’s been a crazy experience!” Talbert said. Just a few weeks prior, Talbert competed in Eugene, Oregon, during the National Championship rounds where she qualified for the Olympic Trials shortly after, therefore she had little time to prepare and rest. “I’ve run all the races that I want to run,” Talbert said. “Pros and collegiate athletes have very different schedules, so it was very hard to be racing at that level as a collegiate athlete at the end of my season,” she noted. “By then, you’ve been racing for months and months and months, while professionals have been racing for only a few months. So I was at my peak physically, and it was very hard to maintain my endurance. It was kind of overwhelming.” Nevertheless, Talbert added that competing in the Olympic Trials was an incredible opportunity. “The Olympic Trials was a completely amazing experience. I was envious of the high school athletes because they hadn’t had nationals yet,...
Professor traveling in France offers perspective on Nice attack, advice to study-abroad students

Professor traveling in France offers perspective on Nice attack, advice to study-abroad students

Nearly a week after the recent terror attack in Nice, France, the French people are still reeling from the loss of 84 people after a man drove a truck through a crowd of spectators celebrating Bastille Day. The chair of the English and Foreign Languages department, Dr. Kimberly Reed, was traveling in France the day of the terrorist attack. Although she was visiting Brittany, France, which is many hours away from Nice, Dr. Reed said the horror of the attack echoed all across the country. “After the initial shock, I think there was a sort of stunned disbelief that this had happened for the third time in about 18 months (the Charlie Hebdo attack early last year, and then the Paris attacks last November),” Reed said. Reed had spent Bastille Day at a celebration in memory of a friend who died of ALS a few year ago, so she did not find out about the terrorism until very late that night, but she, along with friends she was visiting, were sickened when they heard the news. “When I went to my friend’s house the next morning, she and her family had just found out about the attacks. They were, of course, horrified and upset.” Reed continued, noting that even though she was many miles away from Nice, people in Brittany, and all over the country were mourning. “I think most French people, regardless of the area they’re from, were very upset by this. They do have a strong sense of national identity, by and large, and so I think they see this as an attack on them all.” France’s president, François Hollande, extended the state of emergency in...
‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

The controversy and backlash surrounding the female “Ghostbusters” reboot has been in the air since the first trailer dropped in March. After months of angry comments, extreme dislikes and waiting, we finally have the answer to the question, “Is the film actually any good?” In my opinion, yes. I actually think it improves on the original. Physicist Erin Gilbert (Kristen Wiig) reunites with childhood friend Abby Yates (Melissa McCarthy), and they team up with Jillian Holtzmann (Kate McKinnon) and Patty Tolan (Leslie Jones) to investigate paranormal activity in New York City. Of course, many doubters and the mayor of the city are against them, until a large device that amplifies the paranormal unleashes an apocalypse of ghosts. As a huge fan of all four of the leading ladies, I was hyped about this movie since it was announced, and I was not disappointed. While certainly paying homage to the original with its many Easter eggs and cameos, “Ghostbusters” was able to stand on its own as a film with its own unique plot and characters. While Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig and Leslie Jones were all fantastic, Kate McKinnon absolutely stole the show with her quirky, adorable, mad scientist characteristics. Almost everything she did was laugh-out-loud funny. I laughed out loud throughout most of the film, whereas I only chuckled a few times watching the original “Ghostbusters.” The secretary character was much more interesting in this version, and there were more ghosts to bust. Best of all, the bonds between the characters were much stronger. These ladies (and Chris Hemsworth) just work so well together, and it’s nice to see...
NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR

NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR

Lipscomb athletics continues to succeed off the field as well as on the field. Men’s & women’s golf and softball both received the NCAA Public Recognition award for accomplishments in the classroom this past week. This award comes a season after Kristin Ryman’s softball squad was named National Champions in the classroom for their cumulative GPA (3.65) by the National Fast Pitch Association. Lipscomb Softball’s All-American second baseman (2014-2016) Baylee Williams just completed her collegiate career. Williams was part of the National Championship team for GPA and acknowledges how important her time in the classroom was. “Academics to an athlete is very important because sports are temporary and academics is what is ultimately going to determine how life is after college,” Williams said. “It’s important to have a good balance between the two, but academic focus will get you further in life.” The three teams were honored for finishing in the top 10 percent in the Academic Progress Rate (APR) in their sports during the 2014-15 academic year. All three teams posted scores of 1,000. “”We are very proud of our golf and softball athletes who continue to excel academically, as well as on the field or course,” Dr. Lin Garner, associate athletics director for academics and senior woman administrator, said in a statement.  “Kudos also to their coaches who invest so much time in and attention to academics.” The APR is meant to hold NCAA institutions accountable for their academic progress and graduation, which has become a major focal point in recruiting. Teams must earn an APR of 930 to compete in Championships. Visit the NCAA APR’s website for a...