Lipscomb provides students with free flu shot

Lipscomb provides students with free flu shot

Lipscomb University is promoting ways to stay safe, not only during this pandemic but with flu season approaching as well. Lipscomb is hosting the Bison Flu Fest, which will give all students the opportunity to get a flu shot right on campus. In efforts to keep the campus open, and all students safe, Lipscomb is making this a FREE event, and students do not need insurance in order to participate. The Bison Flu Fest has been coordinated by Lipscomb’s chapter of American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists and Lipscomb University Health Services. This will be a two-day clinic at the Allen Arena concourse. Starting Wednesday, September 23 and Thursday, September 24, from 9 am – 5 pm. There will also be an additional date for Saturday, September 26, from 10 am – 2 pm. It will be a drive-through flu shot clinic right in front of Allen Arena where Lipscomb Pharmacy students will be administering the shots.  Lipscomb highly encourages all university students to get a flu shot to reduce the spread of respiratory illnesses. Reporting the number of positive cases of COVID-19 on campus has been low. As the university continues to stay on high alert for the health and safety of students and faculty on...
A year of severe weather events may point to the broader problem of climate change

A year of severe weather events may point to the broader problem of climate change

So far, this year has consisted of a local tornado, wildfires burning up the west coast and the southeast facing an unprecedented number of hurricanes. However, extreme weather events like these are not predicted to disappear when the clock strikes midnight this new year’s, they just might be becoming the new normal. “Climate change is happening; we are seeing the effects now, and we can anticipate that the effects will continue into the future and likely become more severe,” said Emily Jones, Director of the Institute of Sustainable Practice at Lipscomb. Jones said, “What we know is that the Earth’s atmosphere moderates and plays a huge role in climate and that the earth does go through cycles of warmer and cooler periods based on a host of different factors,” “Carbon dioxide, methane and a handful of other manmade or human released substances in the atmosphere contribute to warming.” According to NASA, the planet’s average surface temperature has risen about 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.9 degrees Celsius) since the late 19th century. “This doesn’t mean that warming is equally spread out across the globe,” says Jones “Sometimes that means some places are wetter than usual or drier than they were historically… the phrase climate change is more broad than global warming because global warming is talking about one change to climate and climate change encompasses other changes like changes in weather patterns.” These changes in weather patterns are demonstrated by what’s been occurring this year. On the west coast, higher temperatures have dried out vegetation, creating the perfect breeding ground for massive wildfires and making them harder to contain. “With regard to hurricanes,...
Lipscomb Postal Services deliver community to campus

Lipscomb Postal Services deliver community to campus

In recent months, the United States Postal Service has found itself becoming deeply politicized ahead of November’s election. Amid a global pandemic, the USPS is critical in order to handle the expected record number of mail-in ballots. Last month, United States President Donald Trump expressed opposition to funding an additional $25 billion in aid to the postal service, citing fears over fraud from mail-in voting. Despite Washington battles, the bipartisan agency is still held in high regard with the public (a Pew Research survey in April found that 91% of Americans have a favorable view of the Postal Service). The USPS’s critical role takes shape in communities across the country, including here on Lipscomb’s campus. “The post office is a vital part to keeping us connected,” said Ronnie Farris, postmaster at the Lipscomb post office. Farris has been involved with the Lipscomb office for nearly 40 years, starting first as a student worker and evolving over time just as the postal service has. “You know, it’s just, it’s changed so much…I always have been asking this question, ‘what’s next?’ What is the next thing we need to be doing that we need to be aware of to serve our community?” These changes took shape this spring when coronavirus concerns shut down the campus. “We never closed. We were here…we still had packages coming in, we still have mail going out there, all these other functions were still happening.” Similar to other campus institutions, the postal office adapted by installing plexiglass to pick up windows, enacting mandatory temperature checks for employees, and using a whole bunch of hand sanitizer. “What we’re trying to do...
Lipscomb students affected by fires ravaging the West Coast

Lipscomb students affected by fires ravaging the West Coast

Lipscomb students, with families trying to survive the firestorm consuming the West Coast, anxiously await word from home while also watching news reports about the most-extensive wildfire carnage in history. The West Coast, from down near Los Angeles all the way up into Washington State, is on fire, forcing states of emergency to be declared in the big cities as wildfires incinerate whole towns, flames lick at the edges of urban areas and skies turn orange/yellow as fire and smoke pollution filters out the sun. “There’s really hazardous air quality, smoke everywhere, ash on all the cars,” said Sophie Corwin, a Lipscomb nursing major from Salem, Oregon. “My sister says it smells like a campfire no matter where you go and feels like you’re coughing up ash.” The flames are not the only safety concern for regions affected, air quality from smoke settling in valleys has created hazardous conditions that are only expected to worsen. The areas around Corwin’s hometown are under advisory for these conditions. “It’s tough, because I keep calling my family…. It’s hard to see everything being affected by it and just seeing pictures. It’s just completely insane. … I just like feel like I wish I could be there with them,” said Corwin.  “My family camps every year.… We had a reservation for this year but it got canceled for COVID, and so my grandpa hopped on (the computer) and made sure to get it for next year because we all wanted to go camping….  They emailed him and sent a refund because literally everything was destroyed,” Corwin said.  “It was terrible, I cried, and I was like, out...
Lipscomb unveils the Lanier Center for Archaeology

Lipscomb unveils the Lanier Center for Archaeology

While 2020 has brought many unforeseen changes to life at Lipscomb, it has also brought new beginnings. Later this fall, Lipscomb will celebrate the opening of the new Lanier Center for Archaeology. The Lanier Center comes to Lipscomb University from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Texas and brings with it two world-renowned biblical archaeology experts, Dr. Steven Ortiz and Dr. Tom Davis. “We thought it was a really great fit with our mission, being a Christian institution, having archaeology as part of that is really the evidence of what we’ve been reading about in the Bible and what we’ve been studying about. To really be able to dig into that, metaphorically and literally, is an exciting thing for us,” said Dr. Kim Chaudoin, assistant vice president of Public Relations and Communication. As a part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Lanier Center will offer master’s and doctorate degrees as well as a vast library of archaeological resources and artifacts. There are also plans to expand with an undergraduate program in the future. “Most of what we have is a study collection to be used by students. If you take an archaeology class with me, we are in the classroom, but we will also come to the Lanier Center and study the actual artifacts,” said Ortiz. Not only will there be new programs of study, but also opportunities for students to participate in archaeological digs. These trips will be open to all students, not just those studying archaeology. “We have trips all over the Middle East, mostly Israel and Cyprus. We have one project in Egypt, and...
Things to do in Nashville during a pandemic

Things to do in Nashville during a pandemic

Nashville–home of the Grand Ole Opry, country music and the Predators–is a big city that keeps getting bigger, which is great unless there’s a global pandemic that’s currently putting a stop to life as we know it.  According to asafenashville.org, September 1st marked the transition into Phase 2 of the reopening plan for Nashville. While businesses and mask mandates remain relatively unaffected by these most recent changes, restaurants and event venues are now allowed to expand their capacity, provided that social distancing and outdoor availability are followed.  It’s no secret that Nashville has been called out for its lack of attention to these protocols, and downtown Nashville bars have been exposed as doing a particularly poor job. Lucky for you, here’s a short guide of things to do in the huge city of Nashville that won’t get you on the news for being part of the problem.  First things first–the outdoors.  In an article from The New York Times, Lindsey Marr, an engineering professor and aerosol scientist at Virginia Tech, was quoted as saying, “I think outdoors is so much better than indoors in almost all cases.”  So if you’re anxious to get out and want to stay as safe as possible, try a hike. AllTrails.com lists Radnor Lake State Park, Beaman Park and Long Hunter State Park as some of the top hikes in the Nashville area.  Another option is going to Cheekwood, a botanical garden with plenty of flowers to see and activities to do.  However, before you visit any of these parks, just be sure to check each park’s website for closings and information.  Although quarantine allowed for...