Dachshund-racing, ax-throwing among Oktoberfest highlights

Dachshund-racing, ax-throwing among Oktoberfest highlights

Racing dachshunds, Bavarian hats, traditional German food and beverage and ax-throwing all are part of the mix that makes Oktoberfest one of Nashville’s favorite cultural celebrations. Each year almost a quarter of a million people come out to the free, 10-block festival in the Germantown neighborhood, the city’s traditional German settlement which now has been transformed by countless condominium and residential developments.  The fest — which ran Oct. 12-13  — begins each year with the Oktoberfest 5K run; then vendors and celebrants settle in for a day of all things German, including food, beer, crafts and clothing. And there’s always room for more German stuff, according to Jackie Sharpnack, of the I Love Oktoberfest booth.  “This is my 12th Oktoberfest, and we thought the festival needed even more German heritage, so we opened this booth selling Bavarian hats, German steins, edelweiss jewelry, just so we can bring some of our German heritage to the festival,” she said.  She and many others with German roots come to the festival for a taste of home. The history of the worldwide Oktoberfest celebrations dates back to the early 1800s. A royal marriage took place between Crown Prince Ludwig and Princess Therese, the couple invited the citizens of Munich, Germany, to celebrate with them. After, the celebration has been held to commemorate the grand party over the world.  Despite the festival seeming like one big party, there were children, families, and dogs by the thousands in attendance at the festival. Over 150 dachshund’s attended the festival as competitors. These pups ran 50 feet to determine the fest’s annual Dachshund Derby...
PREVIEW: Dove Awards set to return to Lipscomb stage for 50th annual show

PREVIEW: Dove Awards set to return to Lipscomb stage for 50th annual show

It’s that time of year again — a white tent has been placed outside Allen Arena, and weekly parking email warns of an expansive list of closed parking spots for Tuesday evening when Lipscomb will host the 50thannual Dove Awards. It’s Lipscomb’s seventh year hosting the GMA Dove Awards, and as usual, several genre heavyweights will be in attendance. This year’s guest list includes artists like Lauren Daigle, Amy Grant, Hillsong Worship and MercyMe. Performances are expected from the five new artist of the year nominees Riley Clemmons, Austin French, Kelontae Gavin, Josh Baldwin and Aaron Carter. The nominations for major category song of the year shine a light on writers and performers like Francesca Battistelli’s “The Breakup Song” and Lauren Daigle’s “You Say.” Daigle’s song “You Say,” co-written by Jason Ingram and Paul Mabury, recently broke the record for the longest No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot Christian Songs chart. Presenters will include comedian John Crist, Kathy Lee Gifford, for KING & COUNTRY and Lipscomb alum Pat Boone. Lumination will bring you full coverage of the big event, so check back Tuesday evening. Till then, check out last year’s coverage here.  Photo by Ben...
Lipscomb Academy football shuts out Rossview 35-0

Lipscomb Academy football shuts out Rossview 35-0

  The Lipscomb Academy football team won Thursday night’s non-conference home game against Rossview High School 35-0. In their first shutout of the season, the Mustangs (5-2) scored early and tallied 28 in the first half against the Hawks (4-4). In the second half the clock stayed running after the fifth touchdown. The Arcadian Wild and Ashlyn Grayce played the pre-game show at the Mustang Stampede. Both acts have Lipscomb roots. The Arcadian Wild is led by songwriters and Lipscomb alumni Isaac Horn (guitar) and Lincoln Mick (mandolin). Ashlyn Cranford was a strategic communication major at Lipscomb and graduated in 2018.  Players and students decked out in pink for the game in support of breast cancer awareness month. The team also ran out to the field through a tunnel of Lipscomb community undergoing or having gone through the battle with breast cancer.  The Mustangs will play Franklin County on Oct. 18 in...
Dead Land Haunted Woods shows visitors the frightening side of October

Dead Land Haunted Woods shows visitors the frightening side of October

With the emergence of autumn temperatures into the Nashville area, “spooky season” seems to have finally arrived. Apple cider, corn mazes, and anything pumpkin spice offer up a way to celebrate the fall season. However, Dead Land Haunted Woods shows visitors the more frightening side of October. Sitting in the neighboring woods of the Cedars of Lebanon State Park, the drive to Dead Land is isolated in a way that sets the mood for a frightening night. The attraction offers three separate experiences, each unique in how they capture terrified screams. “The Crypt” is a vampire-themed attraction located in a small building with tight winding hallways. With each turn of a corner, you’ll find yourself haunted by a new set of characters. The very dark halls can get extra spooky when you find yourself lost in the maze-like effect of the attraction. At the end of your time inside “The Crypt,” the sight of deep woods will be a relief. However, that feeling will certainly change after finding yourself on one of Dead Land’s haunted trails. The first of those trails, “The Portal,” begins in a haunted library where you will prepare to experience all your worst fears. The journey then leads to a dimly lit path scattered with spooky characters and sets. Each is dedicated to a separate common fear like spiders or clowns. Experiencing this path is a great way to burn off all the Halloween candy, as you will find yourself running through twisting branches to avoid terrifying faces and sounds. The third and arguably the scariest attraction, “The Curse,” begins with the opportunity to hand...
Cool weather heralds the start of pumpkin season in Nashville

Cool weather heralds the start of pumpkin season in Nashville

After a long, hot summer and early fall, the weather has finally cooled down to average temperatures. With this, the season of corn mazes, haunted houses, and all things pumpkin has begun. During the month of October, Nashville is filled with countless activities for both the fearless and faint of heart to enjoy. One such excursion is just a five-minute drive up Granny White Pike and into the 12 South neighborhood. Across the street from Urban Grub, Nashville Pumpkin Co. has set up a miniature pumpkin patch in the heart of the city. The displays are filled with the typical orange pumpkins, but also with numerous heirloom pumpkins and beautifully speckled squashes each in varying shades of green, pink, white, red, and yellow.  While you browse, you have the option to play pumpkin bowling, a game where you attempt to knock down 10 wooden ghosts with a miniature pumpkin. There is also the opportunity to take pictures with the pumpkin photo backdrop to pass the time. Not only does the pumpkin patch have cute photo opportunities and a great selection of fall decor, but the patch is only a few yards away from Frothy Monkey, Portland Brew, and White Bison. These are popular spots for all your fall beverage needs, which will further get you into the fall spirit. Whether you need decor for your house, apartment, or dorm room or you just want to take cute fall photos, Nashville Pumpkin Co. should be your go-to stop. Continue to check back in Lumination Network to see all the fun activities going on around Nashville this fall....
Lipscomb Pharmacy Dept. preps students for flu season with annual Bison Flu Fest

Lipscomb Pharmacy Dept. preps students for flu season with annual Bison Flu Fest

With the chilly fall winds of October, also come the sneezes and sniffles of Flu Season. This annually recurring period usually runs its course between October and May, with an increase of cases ramping up when the weather gets cold. Trying to help reduce flu cases on campus, Lipscomb’s Pharmacy Department is hosting Bison Flu Fest, which offers vaccinations at little to no cost to students. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there were 37 to 43 million flu cases last year in the United States, with children and pregnant women being at the highest risk. However, Elizabeth Melby, a junior in the nursing program, says this time of year can also be dangerous for college students. On a busy campus like Lipscomb, students may be carriers without knowing it, and the close proximity only increases the risk of contracting the flu. “College students aren’t sleeping as much and have high-stress levels, so their immune systems have to work a little harder to keep up with the stressful environment. If even one student goes to class sick, then everyone else that sat in that chair can potentially spread the virus. Things like the flu spread easily that way.” As a result, the College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences is working to protect the Lipscomb community with the Bison Flu Fest, a solution is more simple than you may think and readily available on campus. During the event which takes place on Wednesday, October 9th from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., certified student pharmacists and physician assistants will be giving free flu shots in Bison Square. Their goal: to...