One month after apology for cotton stalk centerpieces, President Lowry offers reflection

One month after apology for cotton stalk centerpieces, President Lowry offers reflection

The incident concerning cotton stalk decorations during a dinner for African American students at President Randy Lowry’s home occurred one month ago. The infamous dinner made national news, not only for the display of cotton stalks during the dinner, but also for the cornbread and collard greens meal that was served at President’s Lowry’s table and the live banjo and Stevie Wonder music played. On September 15, the day after the dinner, President Lowry wrote an apology. Race relations have been the subject of campus-wide discussion and activities; the following Monday, the on-campus Media Masters event hosted by Robert A. Jackson, Jr. discussed race communication and bias. Also, the appointment of Keandra Golden as an interim African American students coordinator was announced during “The Gathering” chapel. The week of the dinner and apology, the African American students coordinator position was vacant. Lowry noted that Golden was “gracious” to step up and help where she was needed, even though this isn’t what she originally came to Lipscomb to do. In an exclusive interview with Lumination, President Lowry noted he believes that oftentimes one grows the most after going through a difficult time. This analogy, he believes, is indicative of how the university has taken steps to reflect and rebuild since. “Hopefully, we’ll look back six months from now and say, ‘Some of that growth would not have happened, had we not a difficult moment,'” Lowry said. “For some of our sister schools in Florida, they’ve grown because of a hurricane. They didn’t ask for it, and they wouldn’t want it to happen again, but they’ve grown because of it, and it never would have happened...
Lipscomb blacks out on Friday the 13th

Lipscomb blacks out on Friday the 13th

Friday the thirteenth: a day of superstitions, unlucky events, human fear and a concept that Hollywood adores for horror movie plot lines. Whether myth or fact, Friday the thirteenth means something different to each individual, and for those who believe in the superstitions surrounding the day, this Friday the thirteenth on Lipscomb’s campus will be one to stray away from. At approximately 11:00 PM this evening, the campus will go black, a chill will be in the air as temperatures drop to low sixties and every creak and whisper in the wind will be heard from Bison Hall to High Rise. To parents, this may appear as the campus’s way of promoting Halloween spirit. However, that is not the case this time around, and it is actually a lot more serious. Lipscomb has an urgent need to replace a failing transformer that helps bring power to the campus. “We regret any inconvenience this may cause, and we do not schedule outages like this unless there is an absolute urgent need,” said Mr. Jeff Wilson, Director of Service Operations in an email to students last week. In the same email from Wilson, it stated that the goal is to have the power back up and running by 10:00 AM tomorrow morning. Though, the email also stated that they cannot guarantee this time or the exact length of the outage. During the outage there will be no heating, air conditioning, lights, phone charging capabilities, or hot water. In addition, locations on campus such as Beaman Library,  Au Bon Pain, Starbucks and Bison Café will open later than normal, depending on when power returns. In an email that was sent out this...
‘Happy Death Day’ falls short of ‘Groundhog Day’ genre films

‘Happy Death Day’ falls short of ‘Groundhog Day’ genre films

“Happy Death Day” delivers a unique take on the “Groundhog Day” inspired genre. Jessica Rothe (La La Land) plays Tree Gelbman, a stereotypical sorority girl who lives a life of late night parties and early morning hangovers. With her mother’s passing and birthday on the same date, she has become reluctant to celebrate. She begins her day by waking up with a hangover and realizing she’s in Carter’s bed, played by Israel Broussard. He offers to cure her hangover but she quickly denies the help and begins the walk of shame back to the sorority house. On the way home, she receives multiple phone calls from her father, which she ignores. Her roommate and loyal friend, Lori (Ruby Modine) attempt to celebrate Gelbman’s birthday but are both soon turned down. Gelbman later stops at her professor’s office inside a hospital, where the audience learns that the two are having an affair. While walking to a party later in the day, she finds herself approached by the killer. In a last attempt of survival, she fights to get rid of the killer but to no avail. To her surprise, she wakes up at the beginning of the day and begins to relive it. Gelbman initially believes that she has had a bad dream and continues the day as normal, but in doing so the same outcome happens. Realizing that this is not a dream, she confides in Carter about her situation and he helps her find out who the killer is. She spends her each repeated day investigating which one of her friends or acquaintances wanted her dead. During her investigation, she realizes the error of her ways in how she treated people and how her actions affect the people who truly care about her. At the end of the...
Fleming’s long basketball journey leads to eligibility at Lipscomb

Fleming’s long basketball journey leads to eligibility at Lipscomb

Stability would not be a term used to describe the basketball career of Andrew Fleming. The 6-foot-6 guard has experienced constant changes of scenery throughout the last four seasons of his career in Nashville. The former Ensworth High School star has finally found a permanent home back in the Music City as a member of Lipscomb’s 2017-18 basketball team. Fleming was declared eligible by the NCAA last week, allowing him to fully participate in all games this season. “I just found out (last Tuesday),” Fleming said. “I kept the faith and I am so thankful for all of the opportunities I have been given.” Fleming announced his decision to transfer from Chattanooga to Lipscomb via Twitter in early May. “I love it here and I’ve been through a lot, so I’m glad Coach (Alexander) took a chance on me,” Fleming said. “Faith and values are also very important to me and that made Lipscomb a nice fit.” Fleming first gained notoriety at Ensworth, where he amassed 1,117 points in three seasons and was named TSSAA DII-AA Mr. Basketball in 2014. For his senior season, Fleming transferred to Oak Hill Academy, a prestigious prep basketball school in Wilson, Virginia. The school has produced numerous NBA stars including Kevin Durant, Rajon Rondo and Michael Beasley. Oak Hill allowed Fleming to showcase his talents to college recruiters. He took full advantage of the opportunity by hitting 72 three pointers and leading his team to a 47-1 season record and a runner-up finish in the Dick’s Nationals Tournament at Madison Square Garden. Iowa, Auburn, Florida, Memphis, Nebraska and UNLV were just a few...
Kuper excels with Lady Bisons volleyball as freshman

Kuper excels with Lady Bisons volleyball as freshman

The Lady Bisons recruited four freshman to play for the Lady Bisons this year, one of them being 6 foot tall, high school All-American Megan Kuper. The outside hitter has appeared in 16 of Lipscomb’s 17 games this season. Kuper has 31 kills and 13 service aces, which are both highs among the newcomers. “It’s been an amazing experience, and it’s a privilege that I have the opportunity to be apart of [the team],” Kuper said. In 2016, Kuper, an Olathe, Kansas native, led her high school team to the Kansas 6A State Championship. Kuper noted that part of her transition from high school to college has been getting used to traveling and playing competitive games throughout the school week. “The major difference between high school and college is the level of competitiveness and faster speed of the game at the college level,” she said. “It’s been hard getting used to missing so much school but the teachers and my teammates help me stay on top of it.” Despite the amount of missed classes and extra work, Kuper said having a team to support her helps a lot. “From the day I got here, we all became so close,” Kuper said. “They are my favorite people to be with every day, and I don’t get tired of them.” Her best performance of the season came at Florida on Sept. 16, when she had seven kills, two services aces and 26 total attack attempts. “I’m looking forward to all the experiences I’ll be exposed to and all the memories I will gain from the girls and coaches,” she said. Lipscomb currently has an...
Tau Phi celebrates 38th annual Cowboy Show

Tau Phi celebrates 38th annual Cowboy Show

Tau Phi took some inspiration from country music star and club alum Thomas Rhett as the men’s social club hosted its 38th annual Cowboy Show Saturday night in Collins Alumni Auditorium. The night began by recognizing and praying for the victims and family members affected by the Las Vegas shooting at the country music festival last weekend. The show featured the men of Tau Phi and the women of Lipscomb singing country music hits varying from Charlie Daniels’ “Devil Went Down to Georgia” to Thomas Rhett’s “Playing with Fire.” The money the club raised through ticket sales went to its philanthropy, Room in the Inn. Tau Phi member Hunter Taylor directed this year’s show and said he really loved the job of directing. “It has been a stressful few months but seeing the show go off without a hitch made it all worth it,” Taylor said. Taylor noted his favorite part of the show was singing “Forever Country” with Lipscomb student Peytan Porter. “It was a tough song to pull off, and I couldn’t have done it with out my assistant directors, Amy Hurd and Jonathon Flatt,” Taylor said. “Having that song run smoothly with so many moving parts was a great feeling.” Austin and Colin, most recognizable from their viral videos “Welcome to Nashville” and “We Want to Be on the Jimmy Fallon Show,” hosted the show, filling the night with sarcastic humor and “dad jokes.” The duo sang the first song, “Something I’m Good At,” to kick off the night. The rest of the singing acts were a mixture of group numbers, duets and solos with the men of Tau Phi and Lipscomb women who had auditioned to help out with the show....