It’s Valentine’s season at Lipscomb, and that means Bison Match

It’s Valentine’s season at Lipscomb, and that means Bison Match

In a ‘ring by spring’ world, how are all the single students supposed to find love on campus? The Lipscomb College of Computing and Technology designed a matching service that helps students find a date just in time for Valentine’s Day. Lipscomb’s chapter of the Association of Computer Machinery (ACM) hosts Bison Match every year to raise money for their events and to help students work on creating algorithms. The quiz starts with basic information and lets students upload a picture and a short bio. It then moves into more creative questions, such as an ideal date and how students would describe themselves using social media apps. ACM President and senior computer science major Andie Goode shared how the matching system works. “It’s really simple, we are not psychologists,” Goode said. “It’s ten questions and the matching is based on if you have the same answer for a question, then that’s your percentage. It’s kind of made to be a fun, goofy Valentine’s thing.” Despite having a matching percentage, it’s not guaranteed that students’ matches will see them. A student could be matched with someone who has a larger number of matches with a higher percentage, and the results only show the top five. “It’s kind of nice, because if you take the quiz and you don’t see anything that looks good, somebody else could still approach you that you didn’t get matched with,” Goode said. “It’s nice to have that extra [boost to] get your name out there.” Due to the fact that Lipscomb has more female students Goode said the number of students that participated were one-third...
Bisons stumble in first ASUN loss to Liberty

Bisons stumble in first ASUN loss to Liberty

The Lipscomb men’s basketball team just hit a speed bump in what has otherwise been a near-perfect season. After the Bisons handed Liberty a 79-59 defeat in Lynchburg, Virginia on Jan. 29, the Flames returned the favor by escaping with a 74-66 victory Wednesday in front of 3,437 Allen Arena fans. “The only thing to do is tip your hat to [Liberty],” Lipscomb coach Casey Alexander said. “Our teams are comparable… we’re both efficient at what we do. They were just better.” The loss was Lipscomb’s first in ASUN play and snapped an 11-game win streak. The Bisons (20-5, 11-1 ASUN) had not lost since Dec. 30 at Clemson (84-67). Lipscomb senior Rob Marberry led all scorers with 22 points, while Garrison Mathews had 19. Five Flames finished in double figures, including Lovell Cabbil (16) and Scottie James (15). Lipscomb fell behind early and never regained the lead. Eight different Flames scored in the first half, and Liberty held a 38-27 advantage at halftime. Liberty’s low-tempo style threw the Bisons for a loop. Lipscomb committed 12 turnovers and shot 37 percent from the field. In the second half, the Bisons made just one of their 11 three-point attempts. “The tempo was a struggle for us,” Alexander said. “It was a low-possession game. We didn’t have much movement offensively early…we got the ball inside and had empty possessions.” Liberty (22-5, 11-1 ASUN) led by as many as 16 points with 18:21 remaining. But the Bisons showed resiliency and kept chipping away at the deficit. A three-point play from Ahsan Asadullah cut Liberty’s lead to 62-58 with 3:58 left, and Mathews...
Lumination Radio to broadcast men’s basketball game against Liberty

Lumination Radio to broadcast men’s basketball game against Liberty

Lumination Radio is slated to run a live broadcast of Wednesday night’s game against Liberty University at 6:30 p.m. CT. Spencer Boehme will be on play-by-play, and Russell Vannozzi will be on color. The stream is free to listen to, and you can access it here. Pregame is at 6:15 p.m. CT. The Bisons are 20-4, undefeated in the ASUN and ranked 30th in the NCAA NET rankings. Liberty (21-5, 10-1 ASUN) stands at 61st. The Bisons beat Liberty 79-59 last time the two teams met. Senior guard Garrison Mathews averages 19.8 points per game for the Bisons. Redshirt junior forward Scottie James averages just over 12 points per game. For more information, follow Lumination Network on Twitter @luminatinnet and Lumination Radio...
Lipscomb security reviews funding needed for manpower, technology

Lipscomb security reviews funding needed for manpower, technology

The majority of the calls Lipscomb Security receives are for locking and unlocking building doors or jump-starting students’ cars, but that’s not the limit to what the team is prepared to handle. Assistant Directory of Security Patrick Cameron said the staff tries to prepare for as much as it can since the scope of its duties can be broad. “Just look at tonight — you never know what’s going to happen,” Cameron said. “We spent a fair amount of time at the Student Activities Center with a kid with a pretty bad break of his ankle, and later on we’re dealing with a tree that’s blocking Granny White.” The staff carries out training at the Nashville Armory, where the team goes over different crisis scenarios such as bomb threats or active shooters on campus. All the officers are certified in CPR and receive defense training with mace spray and a baton, and several armed officers receive gun safety training and have carry permits. Cameron added that the one area they all agree needs improvement, however, is manpower. Lipscomb has fewer than 20 officers on staff, and shifts need to be covered 24/7. But in the end, the lack of manpower primarily comes down to funding. “We are always looking for ways to improve,” Cameron said. “Our No. 1 priority is to increase manpower combined with technology available to supplement manpower.” These technologies are what he calls “force multipliers,” a technology that will multiply the amount of work a single officer is able to do. One of the multipliers they’d like to incorporate is smart-cameras — cameras that use data...
Sexual Health & Spirituality Chapels offer open discussions on often taboo topics

Sexual Health & Spirituality Chapels offer open discussions on often taboo topics

Lipscomb University held three sessions on sexual health and spirituality during the first few weeks of the 2019 spring semester. This two-part article recaps the last two sessions. Charissa Ricker covered the second session, and Carly Reams covered the third. Second session Lipscomb held a panel discussion on Jan. 24 during a breakout chapel to address students’ questions about sexual health and spirituality. After a campus-wide survey about sexual health was sent out last semester, the Student Health Advisory Committee introduced a series on sexual health. Director of Health Services Erin Keckley spent the first session discussing the results of the survey. The second session panel consisted of Keckley, Kathy Hargis (director of Risk Management and Title IX), Pieter Valk (counselor), Josh Roberts (dean of Student Development) and Prentice Ashford (dean of Office of Intercultural Development). Students were able to submit questions anonymously for the panel to answer ranging from the different health services on campus to Lipscomb’s policies on sexual health. “We believe that if you read the Bible, and you read Christ’s teachings, that sexuality is designed for the context of marriage,” Roberts said. “And so for that reason our policies expect that students who are not married refrain from sexual activity.” The Health Center, the Counseling Center and the Title IX office are three places students can get help on-campus without having to worry about the consequences of Lipscomb’s policies. Roberts stressed the complete confidentiality between those offices and the code of conduct and the disciplinary office. Title IX and the amnesty clause were explained deeper by Hargis, who shared how students who have broken Lipscomb’s...
The long way around: MLB dream still within reach for Chris Nunn

The long way around: MLB dream still within reach for Chris Nunn

Former Lipscomb pitcher Chris Nunn thought his professional baseball career was over on multiple occasions. He was released by San Diego, Milwaukee and Houston. He left the game in 2016 to pursue an MBA at Lipscomb. He nearly lost vision in his right eye after taking an elbow to the face in a pickup basketball game. And, recently, he had to deal with his mother’s breast cancer diagnosis. But on Jan. 28, the 28-year-old inked a minor league contract with the Texas Rangers, who project him to begin the season with Triple-A Nashville – a two-mile drive from his apartment in The Gulch. How did Nunn get here? And how, after all this time, is he back within striking distance of a life-long dream that seemed to be long lost? It took a change in his mindset and workout philosophy, an increase in pitch velocity and a little help from Twitter. Heating up in January It’s a 35-degree January day in Nashville, and Nunn is scrambling to get a quick bullpen session in at Lipscomb’s Ken Dugan Field, a place that “feels like home” to him. He’s working against the clock, because his former college team will be using the field that afternoon. Lipscomb pitching coach James Ogden lets Nunn use the team’s facilities provided that the current players take precedence. The hurler grabs Lipscomb junior Jarrett O’Leary to be his catcher, only to find out that the radar gun in the bullpen needs a new battery. Odgen promptly fixes that issue to bring Nunn’s workout to life. This isn’t supposed to be any type of show. Nunn is...