From battlefield Army chow to sanitizer, Nashvillians wipe out pandemic supplies

From battlefield Army chow to sanitizer, Nashvillians wipe out pandemic supplies

Empty shelves and out-of-stock signs line the aisles of local supermarkets and stores after the coronavirus pandemic began hitting Tennessee hard, with numbers forecast to grow. And that’s not to mention special locations, like Friedman’s Army Navy Outdoor Store on Hillsboro Road, where more-serious survival items are being scooped up. At the grocery stores, items like hand sanitizer and water bottles are all but gone as soon as they are placed on shelves as consumers load up on the items when they take time from their self-quarantines. Toilet paper is almost impossible to find, and in most grocery stores, the paper-goods aisle is either empty or contains a few scattered items. At places like the Publix in Brentwood’s Maryland Farms, kitchen sanitizing wipes are only in stock for moments, although customers now are limited to just two containers per visit. “As the rise in the number of cases and deaths started happening in China, a lot of people started seeing the writing on the wall,” says Nestor Ilagan, a sales associate at Friedman’s. Friedman’s has been open in Hillsboro Village since 1972. Its combination of military surplus and outdoor recreation has made it a popular destination for the getting ready for their isolation. However, Ilagan said that the recent spike in activity has been due to “panic preppers.” “‘Preppers’ typically will piecemeal their supplies together, get all that stuff over time,” he said. “Then you get what we call ‘panic preppers’ — people who buy everything at once.” At one point, Friedman’s carried pandemic preparedness kits, each containing hand sanitizer, respirators, masks and a pandemic information sheet. However, the...
Coronvirus sends Global Learning students home early

Coronvirus sends Global Learning students home early

As the novel COVID -19 continues to spread across the globe, more and more people continue to feel the effects of it, including Lipscomb’s global learning students. Students studying in Florence were moved to Vienna back on February 28th as a precautionary measure since Italy was one of the places under high watch by the CDC. “None of us suspected it to take this huge of a turn for the worst,” said Lipscomb Sophomore Nina Santiago who was studying abroad in Florence. On Friday, students who were studying abroad in Vienna flew back home to the states, their trip being cut nearly in half. President Randy Lowry sent an email to the students abroad and their families that said the following. “This has been a very eventful semester and we are so proud of all of our students for their resiliency and grace in handling all of the changes and uncertainty we have faced over the last few weeks due to the outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19). As you know, the Lipscomb leadership team has been monitoring the COVID-19 situation in Europe on a daily basis. Whether our students are studying on our campus or in locations thousands of miles away from Nashville, our goal of keeping our students safe and secure remains a primary focus.” The students. were taken back by the message but not too surprised. “When we all got the message, we all gasped and started to get really emotional. It’s definitely devastating, but I’m not surprised. I figured it’d probably be coming soon with everything going on, I just didn’t expect it now,” says Rachel...
End of school year will be one unlike any Lipscomb has ever experienced

End of school year will be one unlike any Lipscomb has ever experienced

Thanks to concerns over the coronavirus, the week after spring break this year will be one unlike any Lipscomb has ever experienced. The university announced the following for the week of March 23-27: Undergraduate students will have an extended week of spring break. Graduate classes will resume; programs will determine the format. Faculty will report to campus to transition classes to a remote teaching and learning environment. In a presentation to faculty and staff on Thursday, President Randy Lowry said that “‘closing’ is not a very good word for this.” “We are open and will at some level stay open because we have certain kinds of needs we need to meet for our students,” Lowry said. “We’ll be here working that week [of March 23] so that on Monday the 30th of March, we can reinstitute the educational piece to our students wherever in the country we might be,” he said. “And we will be prepared at that time to extend that as long as we need to. We have to be prepared for a longer-term engagement with students in some kind of effective way.”  President Lowry expressed his safety concerns of both the faculty and staff, wondering what the right decision for the Lipscomb community would be.  “Is a student better off at home or is a student better off here?” Lowry asked. The university had concerns about students all having a home to return to, he said, if it called for a delay of classes.  “Something as simple as where should they be becomes really complex when you try to work down at a level that’s sensitive...
Roger Wiemers receives the 2020 Mary Morris Award

Roger Wiemers receives the 2020 Mary Morris Award

Roger Wiemers, professor with the college of education, is this year’s recipient of the Mary Morris Award. In memoriam to Mary Morris, this award is given each year to a member of the Lipscomb community who has demonstrated a dedication to service in the community. The service and reception for the award took place on March 12. Morris, also a teacher in the college of education, passed away in 2005. “To meet the Morrises was fantastic, and to know that it came from their daughter who had been a teacher herself as well,” Wiemers said. “And to meet some of the past recipients — it was amazing.” During the ceremony, Wiemers quoted Mother Teresa from a 1979 interview with Johnny Carson on “The Tonight Show” when she won the Nobel Peace Prize: “Do you remember when Jesus came in Jerusalem and he was riding on the donkey and everything?” she asked. “Do you think, Mr. Carson, for one moment, that the little donkey thought that the crowd was giving him the praise and glory instead of Jesus? I feel like Mother Teresa: I am that donkey. And Jesus should get the praise.” Wiemers first traveled to India in 1984 and was then called to Papua New Guinea from 1989-1991. After he traveled back home, he learned that a group of Lipscomb students was located in Prague, Czechoslovakia, so he traveled with them from 1992-1994. In 2007, Wiemers was deeply moved to begin a work in India called the Tamar Ministry in Mumbai with his friend P.D. Prasada Roa. He said that he read an article mentioning that over 200,000...
Henna Night leaves a mark on students experiencing new cultures

Henna Night leaves a mark on students experiencing new cultures

As a part of the annual WOW (Welcome to Our World) Week, students organized Henna Night to bring the unique ceremonies and cuisines of Arab, Indian and Middle Eastern cultures to campus. “I want people to know that it’s [henna is] so much more than just decoration,” said Kiana Rafiei, a student organizer for Lipscomb’s Office of Intercultural Development. “Yes, it’s beautiful, but there’s a meaning behind why my culture does this.” During the event, students hired a local henna artist to give interested students the chance to experience the tradition. Henna is a natural flowering plant that is ground into a thick paste and then piped directly on the skin. The wet paste is left on for 15 to 20 minutes until it dries and can be removed, leaving behind a light red or brown tattoo. This temporary body art can last anywhere from a few days to two weeks depending on how dark the stain is. In recent years, henna has evolved into Western fair entertainment and the design, called mehndi, is often mimicked in permanent tattoos. But, as Rafiei noted, the application of henna itself is a deeply rooted art form across many cultures. “I’m Persian, but we do henna as decoration during Eid, the Islamic New Year, as well,” Rafiei said. “It means good luck and prosperity so it’s really important that we apply it with our family. It’s also applied as a pre-wedding tradition in some countries. Usually, the night before a wedding, the bride is given really detailed henna as a symbol of her devotion.” The swirls and swoops of a henna design...
Lipscomb baseball defeats Austin Peay in midweek matchup

Lipscomb baseball defeats Austin Peay in midweek matchup

Lipscomb rebounded in their first mid-week matchup of this week, defeating Austin Peay 9-7 Tuesday afternoon. The Bisons trailed 7-4 in the seventh inning, but sophomore outfielder Ty Jones singled to bring home junior infielder Malik Williams before senior infielder Haddon Adams hammered a grand slam and gave the Bisons the win. Freshman pitcher Patrick Williams started the game. He was later relieved by sophomore right hander JT Caver, but junior transfer Wyatt Folsom was credited with the win after coming in during the seventh inning. Sophomore reliever Tyler Guilfoil got the save, his fifth of the season. The Bisons’ action continues Wednesday afternoon as they travel to Cookeville to take on the Tennessee Tech Eagles before returning home for a weekend series with...