From Colombia to cheer: how David Silva found His calling on a whirlwind journey to Lipscomb

From Colombia to cheer: how David Silva found His calling on a whirlwind journey to Lipscomb

Fifteen years ago in a churchyard in southern Bogotá, an energetic, dark-haired little boy kicked around a soccer ball as the youth minister droned on during his Sunday lessons. The minister’s pleas for him to stay still were in vain—this boy’s heart was taken by soccer. In some ways, the young man so many at Lipscomb have come to know is reminiscent of that boy, but there is a light in his eyes that says something changed. To say that junior Colombia native David Silva has stories to tell would be an understatement. The key to understanding Silva is his love for the game of soccer. For him, this game is woven into who he is. “The ball was my best friend, like Wilson in that Tom Hanks movie. It’s funny because that’s my name too!” Growing up on the southern side of Bogotá brought its own challenges. Although soccer runs in the veins of Colombian culture, not everyone in his neighborhood owned a soccer ball. Sometimes, a plastic water bottle was the next best thing. Silva played constantly, with whatever bottle or ball was around, and he got really good. By the time he was 13 years old, Silva had caught the eye of the academy team of 15-time Colombian champions Millonarios FC. They trained on the north side of Bogotá, so he traveled four hours round-trip every day on a bus to train in the afternoons. He woke up each day at 5 a.m., attended school, stood on the bus for a couple of hours, trained, took the bus home, and returned at 8 or 9 p.m. to his homework and family. Silva kept up this grueling schedule for two...
Corso in “disbelief” after Paralympics silver

Corso in “disbelief” after Paralympics silver

After a whirlwind of a summer ended on a Paralympic podium in Japan, freshman distance runner Liza Corso is only now giving herself time to reflect. “When I crossed the finish line and realized I came in second with a time that was 13 seconds better than my personal best, I was in a little bit of disbelief,” said Corso in an email conversation. Corso, diagnosed with albinism that makes her legally blind, finished second in the T13-class women’s 1500-meter final race in Tokyo on Aug. 28 after being ranked eighth in the field. “Once I had time for it to really sink in, I was just filled with joy and gratitude that God gave me the ability to not only run in the final but also get the silver medal,” said Corso. As a freshman in college, Corso was one of the youngest to compete in track and field at this year’s Paralympics in any event. She says her expectations were modest and that the result really did come as a surprise. “I was definitely not expecting to medal at my first Paralympic Games!” said Corso. “I had thoughts about how amazing it would be to medal, but I wasn’t focusing on it because I just wanted to have a good race,” said the Newmarket, New Hampshire native. In an email with Lumination before her race, she said her overarching goal was to inspire others rather than to secure a result. After her performance, she feels she’s been able to do both “This race taught me to never count yourself out and that God has greater things in...
As Nashville grows, homeless communities are getting neglected; nonprofits offer aid

As Nashville grows, homeless communities are getting neglected; nonprofits offer aid

When it comes to a growing urban community such as Nashville, one of the main concerns, in the eyes of the government, is where people are going to live.  As more and more people move to the city, Metro is eager to increase housing available for those who are able and willing to pay for it. However, those in the lowest income brackets are left behind more often than not.  As a result, many homeless people’s lives are being disrupted. Some people, such as Cecelie Eiler, are now doing work to combat this.  “[Nashville has] got all these people moving here,” said Eiler, a recent Lipscomb graduate who now works with these homeless populations. “We want to put up the nicest things for the nicest people and what that means is…the people at the bottom just keep getting shoved to the side.” With rent prices rising, construction companies are eager to build newer and more housing options and push out those who can not afford the competitive prices, and it’s happening currently in East Nashville’s River Chase Apartments.  Eiler is originally from Freeport, Illinois, and received a degree in environmental and sustainability science at Lipscomb, graduating in May 2021. She now works in the nonprofit sector dedicated to helping the homeless population.   “What’s happening is that there is a set of developers that are buying those apartments and they’re planning to tear them down,” Eiler said. “Currently, there are 60 housing units there that take Section 8.” Section 8 is a government-funded voucher program for low-income houses that allows them to find their own living space. However, the landlord...
Corso talks about overcoming obstacles ahead of Paralympic Games

Corso talks about overcoming obstacles ahead of Paralympic Games

Liza Corso, an incoming freshman this fall, will compete against some of the best runners on the planet in Tokyo, Japan at the Paralympics while her classmates at Lipscomb are starting their school year. Her race will mark the first time a Bison has competed in either an Olympic or Paralympic event. Corso is one of the six fastest 1500-meter runners in her Paralympic class. When Corso finally hits the track in the Paralympic Games on Saturday, she will have every reason to feel proud of herself. Despite all of her achievements and the impressive pinnacle she will reach this weekend, Corso is set on a goal that has nothing to do with success. Corso said she wishes that her struggle with vision impairment will be an encouragement to others. “I hope that I am able to inspire others through my running journey,” Corso said. “I want others to know that even if you are facing an obstacle, with hard work and dedication you can overcome it.” A native of Newmarket, New Hampshire, Corso also has felt immense support from her home base. “I have felt a lot of support from not just my family but also people that I have never met,” Corso said. “Everyone back home has been very supportive and excited.  All of the support and energy helps motivate me to put my best self out there on the track, and I couldn’t be where I am without all the people who have helped me along the way.” Corso qualifies for the Paralympics in the T13 classification, the least impaired class of three categories for vision impairments...
Shane Streich reflects on ‘suprising’ season in days leading up to Olympic Trials

Shane Streich reflects on ‘suprising’ season in days leading up to Olympic Trials

The past week has been electric for Shane Streich, Lipscomb Track and Field runner and first ever Lipscomb athlete to ever compete in a final at the NCAA Track & Field Championships. Streich recently spoke to Lumination about his record-breaking season and the exciting road ahead as a summer Olympics hopeful. Following this interview, Streich has offically qualified for the Olympic Trials set for Friday, June 18 in Eugene, Oregon. He is Lipscomb’s first ever athlete to represent the school in the Olympic Trials. He said of his aspiration to represent the United States as an Olympian “entering the season, my goal was to make it to the national meet,” “After that specific race, I not only gained confidence that I could compete at the national level for a potential NCAA championship; it [also] provided the much welcomed surprise of likely qualifying for my first Olympic Trials.” Shane Streich has been nothing less than dynamic on the track this spring and summer for the Bisons. He recently carried that momentum where no Bison has gone before:  advancing to the final of a national championship track and field event, finishing sixth overall in the nation. On the way, Streich set the school record for an 800-meter race and for a 1500-meter race. Further, he was named the ASUN Conference’s Men’s Outdoor Championship Most Outstanding Track Athlete. Many, though, will not have known much of Streich’s story leading up to his moment in the spotlight Friday evening. Given that he’s a graduate transfer from Minnesota, that could certainly be forgiven, but a proper introduction feels necessary by now. The highly-decorated track and cross-country runner isn’t just...
Riley Hoag reflects on her time in Lipscomb’s IDEAL program

Riley Hoag reflects on her time in Lipscomb’s IDEAL program

During my time at Lipscomb, I was a student in the IDEAL Program. When I began my first year moving into the dorms, I didn’t know anyone who was a student or who was in the program. I was excited about finally being able to get a real college experience and making new friends after moving from another state. My experience during Quest Week didn’t exactly go as I wanted it to be. It was hard being able to make friends with the freshmen who were already younger than I was. When I started classes I was able to meet new people and get to know them. One day in class we were talking about photography and after the class one of my classmates took me to meet the Lumination editor-in-chief. I had expressed interest in taking pictures for Lumination Network. I started getting assigned sporting events to take photos for. I had started making a few friends and then IDEAL assigned peer mentors for the IDEAL students. Two of my mentors happened to be on the women’s soccer team and I had no clue until one night I was taking photos for one of their games.                     Riley with Lumination Network editor-in-chief Mckenzi Harris                     Riley with her IDEAL peer mentors from the Lady Bisons soccer team   I started becoming good friends with my mentors, players on sports teams, and students in my classes. Most of my favorite memories are with my friends on the soccer team because we...