Former Lipscomb soccer player and her husband use sport she loves to minister to boys, young men in Honduras

Former Lipscomb soccer player and her husband use sport she loves to minister to boys, young men in Honduras

A Lipscomb graduate is following her dreams — with her new husband — by moving to Central America to serve the Lord through soccer, the sport she played throughout her college years. Danielle Van Liere graduated from Lipscomb in May of 2020 with a degree in kinesiology. During her time in college she played Division 1 soccer at the University of Florida for three years and then at Lipscomb for a year.  Carter Jackson graduated from Samford University and then worked in admissions at Samford for two years. The couple recently moved to Honduras with the ministry Buena Vista Sports Academy. “Back in February, I decided I wanted to serve in missions in Honduras. I felt like God was calling me to missions and to use my passion for soccer,” said Danielle. “I met a ministry called Buena Vista Sports Academy in Honduras. Their goal is to use the platform of soccer to bring the gospel to the nations and disciple young men and break generational cycles of poverty.” Buena Vista Sports Academy has a mission to take the love of Jesus to tough places, evangelize and disciple boys and young men, pray for the Holy Spirit to light them on fire, and expect entire communities to come to Christ as a result. “I won’t be moving down to Honduras alone, Carter my husband will be moving down with me. Carter will be helping out with soccer, discipling, and doing chores. I will be discipling and helping out with soccer as well.” Training for soccer happens every day and games will be on the weekends. There are some soccer...
Thanksgiving with COVID: Students describe how unwanted ‘guest’ flavors holidays

Thanksgiving with COVID: Students describe how unwanted ‘guest’ flavors holidays

Adjunct professor Tim Ghianni, journalist-in-residence at Lipscomb, asked his 21st Century Media students to ponder the holidays, their traditions and what COVID-19 will or will not spoil this year. Here are some of their responses: Extra cautious because of grandparents My extended family loves being together. Both on my mom’s side of the family and my dad’s. We alternate each year who we spend each holiday with, and each year it is always a blast, laughing together, playing games, sharing memories and just having that time to slow down and just spend time together. Leading up to this year’s holiday season, I think we all feared that we would not be able to spend time together. Thankfully, my family’s holiday plans have not changed drastically because of COVID, but a few things leading up to the holiday season have had to change. I  know for me personally, I had a few trips planned recently that I was really looking forward to, but because I knew that I would be spending Thanksgiving with my grandparents, I had to cancel those trips. Both myself and my brother have had to be extra cautious in these last few days at Lipscomb in preparation for spending time with my grandparents. … I know so many are not even able to be with anyone outside of their immediate family for this holiday season. So many things have been taken away from us this year because of COVID, and it is unfortunate that such a joyful time such as Thanksgiving and Christmas has to be taken away as well. But, hopefully we can all come away from...
African Student Association continues to grow despite the pandemic

African Student Association continues to grow despite the pandemic

Diversity, development, delicacy and dedication; all can be found within the African Student Association. The school year is off to an exuberant start within the Lipscomb community and so is the African Student Association. The African Student Society, also known as the ASA, is seeking to create a welcoming environment for all, establish relationships and foster a village of unity. This dynamic student organization has set foot on a mission to lead by example by creating memorable moments for all on the Lipscomb campus. The first members’ meeting was held on Tuesday, October 20, 2020, via zoom. The president of ASA, Edom Seyoum, brought together all current and aspiring members of the organization and conducted a meeting, which shared events, updates and plans for the group. Information such as meeting dates, study breaks, on-campus events and goals of the student’s organization was discussed. The meeting consisted of about twenty people who are devoted to seeing the Lipscomb community thrive. When given an option to share ideas about the group, Ellycia Bond, a member of ASA, shared a heartfelt remark when she said, “I want to help out but in the right way. I want to do my part to make sure the organization stays alive.” As ASA grows throughout the Lipscomb community, Edom Seyoum has given herself to ensure all students at the university know they are part of one family through Christ. Seyoum expressed her goal for the group when she said, “I want ASA to grow. ASA is not just for African students; it is for everybody.” In a separate interview with Seyoum, the genuine meaning of...
Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb conducts first virtual commencement ceremony to honor graduates in midst of COVID-19

Lipscomb’s 129th graduation ceremony looked quite different than was expected when the school year began in August. Allen Arena, which typically hosts the celebratory event, sat empty on Saturday when the COVID-19 outbreak forced the university to host its first virtual graduation. From the charge to the alma mater, Lipscomb faculty and students combined live and pre-recorded clips to create an all-new commencement ceremony experience. President Randy Lowry opened the commencement ceremony with a video pre-recorded in Allen Arena. “Well this isn’t exactly like I imagined it,” Lowry said. “Here I am standing in Allen Arena, and if this was a normal moment: Students you would be here with me. You would be dressed in caps and gowns, and there would be five thousand people surrounding us as this amazing moment took place. We would march in, we’d hear the bagpipes; the faculty would follow a little bit later. You’d be on the stage walking across, I’d shake your hand, and you would have your college degree, your graduate degree. You would have completed this moment, and the celebration would be wonderful. “The reality is we all know that this is a different time. And we’re giving up something:We’re giving our Allen Arena moment in order to protect others,” said  Lowry. One of the many faculty members joining  Lowry in conducting the online ceremony, Dean of Community Life Prentice Ashford gave out the Stephen Marsh Award. “Steve was a 1977 Lipscomb graduate and the son of one of our former board members, Lee Marsh,” said Ashford. “He was a Christian example in every aspect of his life as a...
Lipscomb IDEAL Program’s first virtual graduation

Lipscomb IDEAL Program’s first virtual graduation

The Lipscomb IDEAL Program used Facebook to hold its 2020 graduation ceremony. Professors, internship supervisors, advisers and peer mentors made videos congratulating these students on their accomplishments during their time at Lipscomb. Graduate Molly Bruns received the Miss Sunshine Award.  “She is so outgoing, social and so involved on campus. She did so well with her academics, but also made lots of new friends,” said Bruns’ adviser Sarah Roe-Hall.s. Graduates Saul Buda and Hassun Syed’s internship supervisor, commissioner Brad Turner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, made an appearance in the videos as well.  “Saul, I love when you would be in the office with me, and we would talk a little bit about sports,” said Turner. “Hassun, I used to always love when you come to my office every morning to shake hands, or give me a high five, or say hello to see how I was doing”. Graduate Erin Campbell’s professor, Scott Sager, spoke on Campbell’s achievements at Lipscomb.  “Your last project in the class was outstanding, and I have shown it to others to show them what good work looks like, and I want you to know how proud I am,” said Sager.  Al Surgeon, the dean of Student Life, closed the celebration. “We are so proud of your accomplishments,” he said. “It has been a great honor for us to watch you succeed here. You bring us so much joy. That is my prayer of blessing for you on this special...
Lumination staffers share their social-distancing experiences

Lumination staffers share their social-distancing experiences

The importance of family time, the joy of TV binge-watching, missing contact with friends in classes, worrying about the illness, learning how to sew, reading books or becoming aware of how important it is to wash your hands are just a few things that have occupied students’ minds in the weeks since spring break and the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown. Here are some of the thoughts and worries from the Lipscomb students in adjunct Tim Ghianni’s Practicum in Journalism. Chances are that fellow students will recognize themselves in these short essays: The thought of being locked in your house without face to face contact with the outside world is terrifying, especially for someone with a go-getter personality. That go-getter would be me. I am the type to try and fill every second of the day with productive tasks, oftentimes making more work for myself just to keep from what I would say is “wasted time.” Throughout quarantine, I have re-learned the art of relaxing. I don’t remember the last time I was able to just sit and watch a movie or hang out with my family just because. While I know this won’t last forever, there are several lessons I’ve learned that I plan to take with me out of quarantine. Most of them are simple, but I’ve learned they are crucial for my mental health. I plan to take more time to enjoy family and friends and just hang out. Life is too short to occupy each second with strenuous working and being “productive.” I also plan to spend more time on the things I love, like photography and art. I...