Students reflect on Thanksgiving traditions

Students reflect on Thanksgiving traditions

As the Thanksgiving holiday approached, journalist-in-residence Tim Ghianni asked students in his writing labs to reflect on their family holiday traditions. Here are their first-person remembrances: Turkey, R&B and games at the adult table During the Thanksgiving holiday break, my family loves to come together at the dinner table and play a series of three games: Spades, Dominoes and Monopoly.  It’s always a good time, because all of us are competitive and hate to lose. The room is full of focus, with the only sounds coming from the R&B music and board game pieces being slapped on the table.  These moments are special, because they get to bring us all into a state of togetherness and competitiveness that we all love and thrive on. When me and my brother were young, we would always watch our parents and older cousins play these games and see the fun that they were having. We would always pace around the table and ear hustle the trash talk and banter that we were probably too young to hear.  Once we got to be older, we were invited to the table and got to participate in these games and conversations. The blessing was not only getting the chance to play the game with people you love and look up to, but you get the opportunity to be surrounded by people with so much life experience.  The conversations were always the best part. The life lessons and stories that were told at the table were always retained in my memory. When I was young, I was simply trying to be a fly on the wall....
Cook crosses Belmont border, transfers to women’s basketball team

Cook crosses Belmont border, transfers to women’s basketball team

Maddie Cook, one of the new additions to the women’s basketball team, transferred in this year from Lipscomb’s biggest rival school: Belmont, where she spent her last four seasons. In her four years at Belmont, Cook led the bench in points and rebounds a couple of times and had a stellar showing in the OVC championship game against SEMO, with 12 points and three rebounds. Although she had some standout games and loved her teammates, she said Belmont never fulfilled what she was looking for in her college basketball career. “I committed to a coach that wasn’t the coach I ever played for at Belmont,” said Cook. “I knew that when I transferred… someone would see me fitting into their style of play.” Along with wanting to stay close to her hometown of Murfreesboro, she said it was a surprise to discover she loved Lipscomb and realized it was the perfect fit. “I actually started to really get to know about Lipscomb and hear from [head coach] Lauren Sumski. I was actually pretty shocked because it was more than I expected,” said Cook. “The coaching staff is very young and energetic, and they are involved but not weirdly involved. Just very caring and personable.” One of Cook’s new teammates, sophomore shooting guard Jalyn Holcomb, said she didn’t know how to feel when she heard Cook was transferring in from Belmont, but she discovered that Cook fit right in. “As soon as practices started and everything, she was never timid,” said Holcomb, a Murfreesboro, Tennessee native. “I think she brought a lot of experience from her being a grad student…...
Junior eSports player says “game on” to leadership, community-building

Junior eSports player says “game on” to leadership, community-building

Kyle Wilson, a junior Data Science major from Atlanta, Georgia, has been gaming for much of his life. “It’s just something that I’ve always been passionate about,” says Wilson. “I know that sounds silly, but like, all throughout high school, that’s like all I did. That’s how I made friends. After school, we all lived like 45 minutes away from each other so we could just hang out online. And then in college, I could do it in person through a club and online. “[In my] freshman year, I saw a gaming club poster on campus, and I got really excited because that’s what I did in high school. I joined the meeting and they told me about esports meetings. When I went to the first one, there were only five of us, so we didn’t even have to do tryouts. So I joined another team as well that did involve tryouts, and was on both teams that semester. I had a blast! I had a lot of fun. Then one of the teams fell apart because people graduated, but the other team kept going and I ended up making most of my friends that way. We created a friendship outside of the team, too. We called ourselves the LUsers — we weren’t very good! But we had fun, and that’s what mattered to us.” At first, the LUsers’ meetings were pretty quiet, but as they played more, the team began to open up and goof around a little more, and Wilson says it was pretty much downhill from there. The LUsers grew and started creating club leadership. Now, all of the people on the team are leaders, excited to welcome a...
From Colombia to cheer: how David Silva found His calling on a whirlwind journey to Lipscomb

From Colombia to cheer: how David Silva found His calling on a whirlwind journey to Lipscomb

Fifteen years ago in a churchyard in southern Bogotá, an energetic, dark-haired little boy kicked around a soccer ball as the youth minister droned on during his Sunday lessons. The minister’s pleas for him to stay still were in vain—this boy’s heart was taken by soccer. In some ways, the young man so many at Lipscomb have come to know is reminiscent of that boy, but there is a light in his eyes that says something changed. To say that junior Colombia native David Silva has stories to tell would be an understatement. The key to understanding Silva is his love for the game of soccer. For him, this game is woven into who he is. “The ball was my best friend, like Wilson in that Tom Hanks movie. It’s funny because that’s my name too!” Growing up on the southern side of Bogotá brought its own challenges. Although soccer runs in the veins of Colombian culture, not everyone in his neighborhood owned a soccer ball. Sometimes, a plastic water bottle was the next best thing. Silva played constantly, with whatever bottle or ball was around, and he got really good. By the time he was 13 years old, Silva had caught the eye of the academy team of 15-time Colombian champions Millonarios FC. They trained on the north side of Bogotá, so he traveled four hours round-trip every day on a bus to train in the afternoons. He woke up each day at 5 a.m., attended school, stood on the bus for a couple of hours, trained, took the bus home, and returned at 8 or 9 p.m. to his homework and family. Silva kept up this grueling schedule for two...
Corso in ‘disbelief’ after Paralympics silver

Corso in ‘disbelief’ after Paralympics silver

After a whirlwind of a summer ended on a Paralympic podium in Japan, freshman distance runner Liza Corso is only now giving herself time to reflect. “When I crossed the finish line and realized I came in second with a time that was 13 seconds better than my personal best, I was in a little bit of disbelief,” Corso said in an email conversation. Corso, diagnosed with albinism that makes her legally blind, finished second in the T13-class women’s 1500-meter final race in Tokyo on Aug. 28 after being ranked eighth in the field. “Once I had time for it to really sink in, I was just filled with joy and gratitude that God gave me the ability to not only run in the final but also get the silver medal,” Corso said. As a freshman in college, Corso was one of the youngest to compete in track and field at this year’s Paralympics in any event. She said her expectations were modest and that the result really did come as a surprise. “I was definitely not expecting to medal at my first Paralympic Games!” said the Newmarket, New Hampshire native. “I had thoughts about how amazing it would be to medal, but I wasn’t focusing on it because I just wanted to have a good race.” In an email with Lumination before her race, she said her overarching goal was to inspire others rather than to secure a result. After her performance, she feels she’s been able to do both. “This race taught me to never count yourself out and that God has greater things in store for...
As Nashville grows, homeless communities are getting neglected; nonprofits offer aid

As Nashville grows, homeless communities are getting neglected; nonprofits offer aid

When it comes to a growing urban community such as Nashville, one of the main concerns, in the eyes of the government, is where people are going to live.  As more and more people move to the city, Metro is eager to increase housing available for those who are able and willing to pay for it. However, those in the lowest income brackets are left behind more often than not.  As a result, many homeless people’s lives are being disrupted. Some people, such as Cecelie Eiler, are now doing work to combat this.  “[Nashville has] got all these people moving here,” said Eiler, a recent Lipscomb graduate who now works with these homeless populations. “We want to put up the nicest things for the nicest people and what that means is…the people at the bottom just keep getting shoved to the side.” With rent prices rising, construction companies are eager to build newer and more housing options and push out those who can not afford the competitive prices, and it’s happening currently in East Nashville’s River Chase Apartments.  Eiler is originally from Freeport, Illinois, and received a degree in environmental and sustainability science at Lipscomb, graduating in May 2021. She now works in the nonprofit sector dedicated to helping the homeless population.   “What’s happening is that there is a set of developers that are buying those apartments and they’re planning to tear them down,” Eiler said. “Currently, there are 60 housing units there that take Section 8.” Section 8 is a government-funded voucher program for low-income houses that allows them to find their own living space. However, the landlord...