Governor Bill Lee speaks to audience of Nashville business leaders on campus

Governor Bill Lee speaks to audience of Nashville business leaders on campus

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee made an appearance in Allen Arena Friday Morning. Lipscomb hosted the “Nashville Business Breakfast” alongside the Nashville Business Journal, featuring the Governor as well as other speakers such as President Randolph Lowry and others. “Together [with other area universities] we will have about 100,000 college students in this area, those are consumers, those are folks who bring life and creativity to our community, they serve generously. And I hope that you are as happy as we are to be in a community where education is very significant.”  Said Lowry before introducing Lee to the audience of the city’s prominent business members. The Nashville Business Breakfast is a tradition that dates back 15 years at Lipscomb. Governor Lee reflected on how he attended the event “many many times” before ever stepping into the Governor’s office, as well as highlighted Lipscomb’s role in the business community. “Not only has this University been a significant part of the fabric within this community,” Said Lee “from a faith standpoint and a higher education standpoint…and from producing leaders but also being a partner and an important piece of the business community.” The event provides the opportunity for Nashville business leaders and students to network with the surrounding community and take part in a Q&A with the Governor. It also allowed Lee to express his new perspective on the business community. “I used to see you [the audience] as colleagues, costumers, and providers but now I see you as job creators… those who create jobs are the most vital part.” Gallery by Mckenzi...
Lipscomb alumna, Cyntoia Brown released from prison

Lipscomb alumna, Cyntoia Brown released from prison

Lipscomb alumna Cyntoia Brown — the subject of debate and outcry about the unfairness of her sentence — was released Wednesday morning from Tennessee Prison for Women. Former Gov. Bill Haslam granted Brown clemency at the close of his term in January of this year. In 2015, Brown, now 31, earned an associate’s degree through Lipscomb’s LIFE program, which brings traditional and non-traditional students together for classes at the Tennessee Prison for Women. In May, she graduated with a bachelor of professional studies degree, majoring in organizational leadership. Brown is a Nashville woman whose case sparked national attention to the human sex-trafficking epidemic, due to the controversy surrounding her sentencing. At age 16, she was convicted of aggravated robbery and first-degree murder. Brown’s defense argued that she was forced into prostitution after a life of abuse. In her testimony, Brown described being picked up for sex by Johnny Mitchell Allen, a 43-year-old Nashville real estate agent. In her trial, Brown said she believed he was reaching for a gun and intended to do her harm, so she felt threatened and shot and killed Allen in what she says was an act of self-defense. Her age at the time of the sentencing was a hot topic for activists. In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles violate Eighth Amendment prohibitions against cruel and unusual punishment. Brown’s original sentencing was that she will eventually be eligible for parole, but not until she’s 67 years old. Brown has displayed gratitude for the educational opportunity offered by the university and the prison system. “I want to thank those at the Tennessee...
Lipscomb opens doors for Red Cross shelter

Lipscomb opens doors for Red Cross shelter

Lipscomb welcomed approximately 13 displaced residents of a Donelson apartment complex after a fire last week.  The residents were placed in the Student Activity Center through the American Red Cross Distaster Relief organization.  “Serving others is an important part of the fabric of this institution. For more than a decade, Lipscomb University has served as an official Red Cross Shelter site to provide housing and comfort in times of need.” said President Randolph Lowry in an email to faculty.  “As an official Red Cross Shelter site, through the years Lipscomb has housed numerous guests impacted by hurricanes, fires, power outages and, most notably, the Nashville Flood in 2010.” The SAC will remain open for regularly scheduled hours, the only interruption being the closure of the basketball and racketball courts as well as the indoor track.  Lowry encourages campus members, “When you see our guests around the SAC and Allen Arena area please make them feel welcome.” “Thank you for being a community that practices hospitality and has a heart to serve others.” The shelter is only expected to remain open short-term, but will remain “as long as needed” for the displaced...
Garrison Mathews makes campus return for ‘Pro Skills Mini Camp’

Garrison Mathews makes campus return for ‘Pro Skills Mini Camp’

Former Lipscomb star and aspiring NBA player Garrison Mathews has made a return to the Lipscomb campus for his “Garrison Mathews Pro Skills Mini-Camp.” The camp takes place Tuesday and Wednesday at the Lipscomb Academy gymnasium.  “A lot of professional players will come back to their hometown, and in a way give back and teach to help the younger generation,” said basketball trainer Colin Stevens, who is helping with the camp. “This is all about Garrison connecting with his people in Nashville and making his imprint now that he’s going on to D.C.” The Lipscomb grad’s NBA career kickstarted late June when he signed a two-way deal with the Washington Wizards. “It’s such a blessing…something I’m going to continue to work for and keep trying to stick,” said Mathews. Mathews represented the Wizards in the NBA summer league, where, he said:  “There were some ups and downs, it’s a tough grind for sure. It was a long summer, but it was good to work out with guys who are obviously great players.”  For Mathews, the “Pro Skills Mini-Camp” gives him the opportunity to return to the campus where he spent the past four years. “They [Lipscomb] did a lot for me on the court and helped me become the player I am today, but they’ve helped me off the court in so many ways that nobody knows.  “I’ve grown so much as a person and not just a player, I can’t thank Lipscomb enough.” The camp welcomes players grades six-12 for the two-day event. “Hopefully they [participants] learn a little about basketball and a lot about themselves,” said Stevens. According to Stevens, this...
More than 800 students awarded diplomas at the 128th commencement

More than 800 students awarded diplomas at the 128th commencement

Spirits were high in Allen Arena Saturday afternoon, as 560 Lipscomb students were awarded their bachelor’s degree diplomas. Earlier that morning, commencement was held for 325 graduate students. The ceremony began with the board of trustee members Bart Harper and Sallie Dean delivering the invocation and scripture reading. Dean read from Philippians 4, including the verse: “Don’t worry about anything; instead pray about everything.” In his President’s charge, President Randolph Lowry highlighted how each graduate had an individual story of how they “overcame challenges” to walk across the graduation stage. “Each of those stories suggests something about the future and how you will contribute to this world,” said Lowry. He recognized first-generation students, student-athletes and graduating veterans. However, he also took the opportunity to tell the story of one particular student, Seth Walker, who has cerebral palsy. “Seth Walker cannot walk,” Lowry said. “He cannot feed himself. He cannot dress. He cannot roll over in bed without assistance. And yet God has given him an amazing sense of cherishing and holding on to all that life provides.” Walker received his Bachelor of Arts degree in theology and ministry. Lowry went on to discuss Ken Brassell, Walker’s caregiver. “For the past five years, he has attended virtually every single class that Seth attended at two colleges,” Lowry said. He then called Brassell up to the stage and awarded him with an honorary bachelor’s degree. Several awards for faculty and a student were then announced: the Outstanding Teacher awards, to Lindsay L. Dillingham, Jon H. Lawrence and Nancy Magnusson Durham; the John William Baker Award, to mathematics professor Carroll G. Wells; and...