Lowry reflects on time as president before stepping aside on Monday

Lowry reflects on time as president before stepping aside on Monday

President Randy Lowry doesn’t exactly remember his first day at Lipscomb. He does remember sitting in his office for the first week or two and not thinking there was much to be done.  Now, 16 years later, as he prepares to end his time as Lipscomb’s president, he no longer has to wonder, “What am I supposed to be doing?”  “Eventually, we figured that out and the pace picked up,” Lowry told Lumination Network. “Once the pace picked up, it hasn’t paused since then.” Lowry said there were a lot of emotions he associated with his coming to Lipscomb, including hopefulness for what he could accomplish.  “This Christian college, which is a sister school to Pepperdine where I was coming from, really could and should be the leading university in our church fellowship,” said Lowry. “I was filled with anticipation, very excited and complemented to be here.” Now, as Lowry steps down as president at midnight tonight and assumes the role of chancellor, he says he’s looking forward to taking a break. He added for context that most university presidents only serve six years.  “After 16 years, if we’re being really honest with ourselves, we’re probably more exhausted than we know. And so I’m going to sleep for the first 10 days,” he said with a laugh.   Lowry said that in the next few months he’ll be taking a working sabbatical in which he wants to take piano lessons, which he hasn’t done since high school. He also said he plans on spending a lot of time with his nine grandchildren, all of whom have been born during his...
Lipscomb extends mask mandate to Sept. 17

Lipscomb extends mask mandate to Sept. 17

The Lipscomb community will remain under an indoor mask mandate till at least September 17. The extension was updated on the university’s website on the first of the month and follows a recent surge in campus COVID cases. “As we are preparing for a strong start to the year, the COVID-19 Delta variant continues to spread and has proven to be markedly more transmissible than earlier strains of the virus,” said the university on its site. “Because of the increasing presence of the Delta variant, we have implemented a few policies and procedures to help mitigate the spread of the virus within our community. These are similar to the policies at peer institutions and other businesses in this region and across the nation.” The Lipscomb mask mandate applies to all students, faculty, staff and guests in university buildings (regardless of vaccination status). The university is also pushing vaccines, informing students that “approximately 99% of those in our nation who are having serious adverse effects or are dying as a result of the virus are unvaccinated.” Lumination will continue to keep you updated...
Mask mandate reinstated for everyone indoors through Sept. 3

Mask mandate reinstated for everyone indoors through Sept. 3

The Lipscomb community will be required to wear a mask in indoor spaces beginning Friday. The announcement was made to students and faculty in an email Wednesday afternoon; it follows a recent surge in local Delta variant cases. “As we are preparing for a strong start to the year, the COVID-19 Delta variant continues to spread and has proven to be markedly more transmissible than earlier strains of the virus,” said the university in its notification of the mandate. “Because of the increasing presence of the Delta variant, we have implemented a few policies and procedures to help mitigate the spread of the virus in an effort to start the semester strong. These are similar to the policies at peer institutions such as the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Middle Tennessee State University and Belmont University.” The Lipscomb mask mandate currently expires Sept. 3 and applies to all students, faculty, staff and guests in university buildings (regardless of vaccination status). The university is also pushing vaccines, adding in the email that “approximately 99% of those in our nation who are having serious adverse effects or are dying as a result of the virus are unvaccinated.” Lumination will continue to keep you updated on this developing story...
Delta variant looms over approaching fall semester, 55% of Lipscomb community reports receiving COVID vaccine

Delta variant looms over approaching fall semester, 55% of Lipscomb community reports receiving COVID vaccine

As summer’s end steadily approaches, low vaccination rates and the rising transmission of the COVID Delta variant are sparking concerns for colleges across the country. “We’re monitoring cases on and off campus that affect our community right now. The Delta variant seems to be a much more aggressive type of the virus,” said Kevin Eidson, Lipscomb’s Director of Health and Wellness. “We want as many people to be vaccinated as possible… getting the vaccine allows you to have some more freedoms that you really don’t have without the protection of the vaccine.” In a video sent out to faculty and staff, Susan Galbreath, Lipscomb’s Senior Vice President for Strategy shared the results of a campus survey revealing 55 percent of Lipscomb’s total population is vaccinated. Full-time employees are at a 74 percent vaccination rate. While higher than Tennessee’s vaccination rates, Lipscomb still falls behind reaching herd immunity. According to Yale Medicine, COVID variants could indicate 80 percent of a population would need to be vaccinated in order to reach herd immunity. The CDC updated its recommendations on July 27 to encourage indoor mask use for vaccinated individuals in COVID “hot spots”. Earlier this summer, the center had rolled back all restrictive recommendations for vaccinated people (except during travel). Davidson County falls under the CDC’s rating of “high” for transmission levels. In response to the new CDC recommendation, Lipscomb says it will “continue to monitor local, state and federal guidance as we get nearer to the beginning of the semester.” Current policy dictates unvaccinated students are encouraged to practice mask-wearing and could be placed in quarantine if exposed to COVID....
Concerts, festivals, artists tuning up for post-COVID return

Concerts, festivals, artists tuning up for post-COVID return

COVID  left most Tennessee residents and tourists and performers saying goodbye to the 2020 entertainment scene in Nashville. Now, it’s 2021. Forty-five percent of the population in the United States is fully vaccinated and 53% of the population has received one dose of the vaccine. As the world continues to slowly go back to normal, so does Music City. With venues being reopened, artists getting out of the studios and their homes and fans ready to cheer, big name concerts and festivals are making a grand comeback to Tennessee. Here’s a sampling: Let Freedom Sing! Music City July 4th @ Downtown Nashville – July 4 The free concert is the city’s first major post-pandemic event and will be headlined by country music star Brad Paisley. Lily Hiatt, Regi Wooten and Friends, Priscilla Block, and more will also take the stage. The event will also feature the Nashville Symphony in a synchronized performance with what officials are heralding as the largest fireworks display in Nashville’s history. Lifest Music City @ Hideaway Farm – July 29-31 Originating in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, Lifest extends Music City for the very first time with Lifest Music City. The Christian music festivals are presented by nonprofit organization Life Promotions, focused on supporting mental health and wellness in today’s youth. With three days filled with music and fun, Lifest gives the option to its concert goers to camp on the festival grounds. The festival will include performances from Newsboys, Skillet, Lecrae, Sidewalk Prophets, Mandisa, Matthew West, Michael W. Smith, and more. Luke Bryan @ Bridgestone Arena – July 30 Fresh off his third ACM Entertainer of the...
Lipscomb set to hold second installment of FREE vaccine clinic

Lipscomb set to hold second installment of FREE vaccine clinic

Lipscomb is continuing its goal of protecting the campus community from COVID, especially with the plans for a full-capacity return in the fall. On Wednesday, May 26 the University is holding its second free vaccine clinic for students, faculty and staff. “We’re trying to do the right thing for our community in being able to protect the community as best as we can.” Said Dr. Kevin Eidson, Director of Health and Wellness to Lumination reporter Abigail Davis in April. The clinic is set to administer both the second dose of Moderna for April event attendees as well as the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Lipscomb previously had the intention of distributing the J&J vaccine at the earlier event. However, the distribution of the vaccine was put on a temporary pause by the CDC after six ‘rare’ cases of blood-clotting in recipients. The CDC has since recommended the use of the Johnson & Johnson be resumed. The free vaccine clinic is available to current Lipscomb Academy and Lipscomb University faculty and staff and university students ages 18 and over. No appointment is necessary. While no official announcement has been made regarding required vaccinations come fall, Lipscomb is pushing students to upload vaccine proof-of-dose to the online health system. Photo via Abigail...