Students describe a school year ‘turned on its head’ by COVID-19

Students describe a school year ‘turned on its head’ by COVID-19

Lipscomb journalist-in-residence Tim Ghianni, an adjunct professor, asked his multimedia storytelling class to describe what it has been like to spend a year studying under the specter of COVID-19. Here are the tales from those who submitted them:   ‘Unsatisfying’ year for a hands-on learner In the last year, the world has been turned on its head. Over 12 months of COVID …. Everything that was important a year ago does not seem to have the same weight as it did.  Everything is different, including schools. I don’t think I would have ever imagined having to be online for classes by force. And it has been the worst. As a hands-on learner, this could not be more unsatisfying for me.  I feel like I have learned nothing in the last year. What sucks, even more, is that there are a lot of teachers that don’t realize how much kids are struggling with this new way of learning.  Many continue to teach as if nothing has changed and that online is the same as being in the classroom. But there are also teachers struggling to feel like they are making a difference in students by this kind of learning.  It almost seems that college was a waste of time because I feel that my collegiate education was taken by COVID. In hindsight, this is small compared to people who have lost loved ones due to this virus. But, any way you look at it has not been great. Mariah Wilson    Opportunities lost due to COVID Going to college during a pandemic has been a very challenging experience for me....
BREAKING: Lipscomb halts J&J vaccine clinic following rare clotting cases, reschedules with Moderna

BREAKING: Lipscomb halts J&J vaccine clinic following rare clotting cases, reschedules with Moderna

Lipscomb’s one-day Johnson & Johnson vaccination clinic was rescheduled and adjusted following the temporary pause on the vaccine’s distribution. Six cases of blood clotting were found in J&J recipients out of the more than 7 million distributed doses. “The use of this vaccine is ‘paused’ for now. This is because the safety systems that make sure vaccines are safe received a small number of reports of a rare and severe type of blood clot happening in people who got this vaccine,” said the CDC in their report. The campus vaccination event is now set to take place Wednesday, April 28. The first half of the 2-dose Moderna vaccine will be distributed for free to Lipscomb faculty and staff and university students ages 18 and over. “Simply take the vaccine card that you will receive at the Lipscomb clinic with you when you go for your second dose and show the healthcare provider,” said Dr. Kevin Eidson, director of health and wellness. “Additional COVID-19 vaccine clinics may be held in the future if there is sufficient demand and more does are made available to Lipscomb.” Lumination will continue to keep you updated on Lipscomb’s vaccine...
All adults 16+ eligible for Covid-19 vaccine in Tennessee by April 5

All adults 16+ eligible for Covid-19 vaccine in Tennessee by April 5

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee announced last week that the Covid-19 vaccine will be available for anyone over the age of 16 by April 5.  People over the age of 16 are currently able to register for the vaccine in most Tennessee counties with the exception of Davidson and Hamilton counties where the minimum age remains at 55.  Under Davidson county’s current eligibility guidelines, people over the age of 16 with high-risk health conditions such as severe asthma or diabetes can register to receive the vaccine.  To find out if you are eligible to receive the Covid-19 vaccine, you can take the screening questionnaire on Tennessee’s official Covid-19 website. When you are eligible, you can register for a vaccination appointment through the Tennessee Department of Health or other vaccination centers such as your local pharmacy.    Update: As of March 31, all Davidson County residents 16 and older are eligible to register to receive the Covid-19 vaccine. Appointments are available for the next two weeks at the Music City Center in Nashville and can be scheduled online or by calling 615-862-7777.   Lumination will continue to provide information about Covid-19 vaccinations as it becomes...
Lipscomb Security Officer Maurice Conner dies after brief battle with COVID-19

Lipscomb Security Officer Maurice Conner dies after brief battle with COVID-19

The COVID death of a man of the cloth who also was a longtime security officer and helping hand to students hit the university, which already had suffered two losses to this plague, hard. “It is with great sadness that I share the news of another loss in the Lipscomb family,” read an email from President Randy Lowry sent out to the Lipscomb community on Thursday afternoon.  Lowry went on to explain that the Lipscomb Security veteran and minister at the 19th Avenue Church of Christ in Springfield, Tennessee, Maurice J. Conner, had died of COVID-19, marking the third loss in the Lipscomb community in the past six weeks.  Conner started at Lipscomb as a student and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in 1981. Shortly after graduating, he joined Lipscomb’s security team in 1983 and while serving the security team also earned his master of arts in Bible in 2000. Lowry shared how respected and loved Conner was among the Lipscomb community due to the “wisdom, compassion, and joyful nature,” that Conner brought to his job every day. “The deep and profound respect and love the security team has for Maurice was obvious as they relayed stories about shared work experiences, his humorous radio calls to dispatch to report on weather conditions during the third shift and their lively conversations about faith, theology and life,” said Lowry. “In addition to being a dedicated security officer, Maurice was also a minister and mentor to his colleagues through the years.” “He was definitely gentle, caring, and very devout,” said security colleague Alex Ryan. “He had clearly done a lot...
Healthcare heroes in Lipscomb nursing community put in line for COVID vaccine

Healthcare heroes in Lipscomb nursing community put in line for COVID vaccine

Lipscomb Health Science students and faculty were moved up in line for the COVID-19 vaccine. This includes students in nursing, pharmacy and dietetics, according to Katie Watson, an assistant professor in the School of Nursing. “Several of our faculty and students have already started their vaccine series and a couple have already gotten their second one…we’re so thankful,” said Watson, who has seen the virus’ impact firsthand. “When we announced that we were seeing COVID patients, it was like the floodgates opened,” said Watson, who works at the Vanderbilt Walgreens clinic. “There was still so much uncertainty. Was it spread airborne? Do we need to wear an N95 mask versus a regular surgical mask? Do we need gown and gloves?” Watson received her vaccine in December, since she’s a member of the Vanderbilt healthcare community. “I will just say how I felt was ‘Wow’, I felt so honored and humbled on how privileged I am for the blessing to be able to be vaccinated.” As vaccines continue to rollout, concerns have popped up over their safety considering the fast turnaround. “I understand the worry of something new…but the government gave these drug companies unlimited funding in order to get this done and that is why it was able to be done so quickly,” Watson said. “So, I say, look at the facts. Check the CDC. Talk to your health professional or the Lipscomb Health Clinic, somebody who is knowledgeable in the medical field versus someone who has probably just read something on Google.” Ashley Newby, a junior nursing student at Lipscomb has also received the COVID vaccine for her...
Changes made to Spring 2021 calendar over COVID concerns

Changes made to Spring 2021 calendar over COVID concerns

As the beginning of the semester looms near, Lipscomb has made adjustments to its upcoming calendar in order to maximize student and faculty safety as COVID case numbers rise. Among these changes is a delayed spring break, online final exams and three periodic “Bison Breaks”. “With another semester on the horizon, we draw upon our experiences and lessons learned in the fall that help us prepare for a spring in which the COVID-19 virus will continue to impact our community,” said Lipscomb’s Incident Management Team in an email to students on Dec. 18. “We are planning for another exceptional on-campus student experience this spring —one that will be enriching, fulfilling and life-changing as well as one for the history books.” Lipscomb’s Bison Breaks will occur on the following days: Feb. 10 March 2 March 25 Spring Break is scheduled to take place April 12-16 and is set to be immediately followed by undergraduate classes transitioning to a remote format for the remainder of the semester. These changes are being made as the CDC ranks Tennessee as one of the worst states for COVID cases per capita after the post-Thanksgiving surge. “If we have another surge over Christmas, it will break our hospitals,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercy in a news conference on Dec. 20. In response to this case surge, Tennessee’s Governor Bill Lee announced an executive order limiting indoor gatherings to ten people and encouraging Tennesseans to keep holiday gatherings to just those in their household. Executive Order 70 pic.twitter.com/ly2CuE8X1Z — Gov. Bill Lee (@GovBillLee) December 21, 2020 Lipscomb’s return to campus plan states that the university will continue to...