Evermore Album Review – Taylor Swift “comes back stronger than a ‘90s trend” with her second album in 5 months

Evermore Album Review – Taylor Swift “comes back stronger than a ‘90s trend” with her second album in 5 months

They say lightning never strikes the same place twice, but for Taylor Swift, it most certainly does. A mere five months after releasing her critically acclaimed surprise album folklore, Taylor Swift returned with another surprise album, evermore. Much like folklore, evermore was created in collaboration with Jack Antonoff, Aaron Dessner of the band The National and Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. Additional writing on both albums is credited to William Bowery, which was revealed to be a pseudonym for Swift’s boyfriend, actor Joe Alwyn. The album is a continuation of many of the themes and musical styles featured prominently on folklore.      Standout Tracks: “champagne problems” Like many of the songs on evermore, “champagne problems” sees Swift craft an intricate fictional narrative rather than recount a personal experience. This piano-driven track takes on the perspective of a character who has just rejected a proposal and laments all of the hurt this has inevitably caused their former partner, despite believing it best in the long run. I love the way that the lyrics of the last chorus change to explain all of the ways that someone else will succeed in all of the places the narrator failed. Taylor Swift’s writing is often most effective in the simplest form, led by just guitar or piano, and “champagne problems” is no exception. I have seen others compare this song to Swift’s fan-favorite track “All Too Well,” but it reminds me more of the piano ballad “New Year’s Day” off of her 2017 album reputation. Regardless, “champagne problems” is simultaneously modern and classic, further ensuring that Swift’s work will last the test...
Lipscomb updates Thanksgiving plans, asks students not to return after break

Lipscomb updates Thanksgiving plans, asks students not to return after break

As COVID-19 cases are on the rise both at Lipscomb and in Nashville, Lipscomb has announced a change in plans regarding the last few weeks of the semester.  It had previously been noted that all students would be given the option to return to campus when classes go virtual after Thanksgiving break. Now, Lipscomb’s administration is asking all students to remain at home following the break. This announcement was made on Nov. 17 in a letter from Al Sturgeon, Lipscomb’s vice president of Student Life and dean of students.  “While we are going to make it to Thanksgiving break this weekend with on-campus living and learning,” he said in the email. (But) “The executive leadership team at Lipscomb met on Monday morning and determined that, as conditions worsen across the U.S. and our region, and given the increased risks posed by travel over the holiday break, it is best for residential students to remain home following the Thanksgiving break.” The email also states that the administration recognizes that this last-minute change is particularly inconvenient to students who were planning to return to campus after the Thanksgiving holiday. However, according to the email, the administration believes  it is the best way to keep the Lipscomb community as safe as possible while COVID-19 cases continue to increase.  “We believe this change is in the best interest of student health, will limit possible coronavirus exposure to others in the Lipscomb community and will also put us in a better position to have a successful spring semester,” said Sturgeon.  Only students with extenuating circumstances will be allowed to reside on campus after the break,...
Album Review: Taylor Swift shows off a new perspective and an old sound on folklore

Album Review: Taylor Swift shows off a new perspective and an old sound on folklore

For my first review, I selected Taylor Swift’s surprise eighth album, folklore. It was announced less than 24 hours before its release on July 24. The album features 16 tracks plus one bonus on the deluxe edition. On folklore, Swift ventures into new genres such as indie, alt-rock and folk and even calls back to her country past. Upon its release, folklore received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics, longtime fans and newcomers alike. Stand-Out Tracks “the 1” – This is not your typical breakup song. Rather than looking back with sadness or anger, “the 1” reminisces fondly about how enjoyable it might have been if things had been different and there had never been a breakup. It offers a refreshingly different perspective, one that is mature but still lighthearted and fun. “exile (feat. Bon Iver)” – Swift’s duet with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver is her best duet since Red (by the way, I am referring to “The Last Time” because I have taste). Swift and Vernon trade verses about how they feel betrayed and misunderstood in a failing relationship. The piano on this song is absolutely gorgeous, and Swift’s and Vernon’s voices combine beautifully despite being very different. “invisible string” – One of the brighter songs on a generally dreary album, “invisible string” sees Swift muse about all of the little moments in her life that brought her to where she is today in the context of her relationships. The song is mature and sweet. Thanks to her Nashville namedrop, I will now always remember Centennial Park not as the park with the fake Parthenon, but the park Taylor Swift sang about. J Overall Thoughts I am a...
Lipscomb Security prepares campus ahead of final presidential debate

Lipscomb Security prepares campus ahead of final presidential debate

Tonight, the final presidential debate between current President Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden will occur just down the road from Lipscomb at Belmont University. In light of this historic event, Lipscomb’s security team has spent weeks making plans to ensure that the campus remains as safe as possible. “For the last month, we’ve really been doing some deep preparation, just getting ready for this evening because we want the campus to remain safe and we want the experience for our students and the employees and any guests that are in the area to be as smooth as possible,” said Kyle Dickerson, Executive Director of Security & Safety. The security team has also been in contact with state and federal law enforcement in regard to making preparations for the night of the debate. “We’ve been talking with the law enforcement partners that are a part of the actual event itself, which includes TBI, FBI, the secret service, just a lot of the big federal entities that are a part of it but also some local entities as well. They’ve been giving us really good information that is helping us feel really good about the evening, which is nice. What they have said is that they are expecting typical things for a debate,” said Dickerson. One of the biggest concerns ahead of the debate is the traffic congestion due to the many road closures around Belmont. “What we think is going to be a really big deal is traffic congestion for the night,” said Dickerson. “Most people don’t go to traffic congestion as their first concern for something like this,...
Counseling Center sees increased demand for services amid Covid-19 pandemic

Counseling Center sees increased demand for services amid Covid-19 pandemic

Lipscomb’s University Counseling Center has seen an increase in the demand for mental health services this semester, due in part to the lasting effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. The University Counseling Center, located on the second floor of the Student Activities Center, offers free, confidential services to all Lipscomb students.  “In the past, the Counseling Center has seen faculty and staff, but something that is new this year is that we are limiting it to just students so we can be more available because there is the expectation that we are going to have an increased number (of students). I think there has already been an increase in demand for services,” said Ashley Dumas, assistant director of the Counseling Center.  Mental health issues such as anxiety and depression have been on the rise nationwide this year as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders. Among Lipscomb students, it is no different. While mental health conditions are typically more prevalent in 18-25-year-olds than other age groups, the events of this year have caused an increase in the demand for mental health counseling among young adults. “We certainly are seeing an increase in appointment requests,” said Dumas. “Generally, for college students, mental health issues are on the rise and that was the case before Covid-19 happened. What we are seeing in those appointment requests is (that) a high number are anxiety-related, stress and depression.” Despite an increase in appointment requests, the University Counseling Center has been able to keep up with the demand for their services thus far. “Right now, we are managing the demand. We have a lot...