52nd Dove Awards celebrate a night of music and fellowship

52nd Dove Awards celebrate a night of music and fellowship

The 52nd Gospel Music Association Dove Awards returned to Lipscomb’s Allen Arena Tuesday night in celebration of a Christian music community that is “stronger together.” After a yearlong hiatus of the in-person ceremony due to COVID-19, the energy of the crowd made one thing clear — everyone was glad to be back.   Nominee Kelly Nelon Clark spoke of the feeling of being together again in her red-carpet interview: “We’re so thrilled; I want to hug everybody!” Lipscomb University President Candice McQueen kicked off the show by offering a welcome to campus, which was followed by a stunning performance from We The Kingdom featuring some African musical inspirations.  Hosts Natalie Grant and Jonathan McReynolds began their duties with a video skit about the pitfalls of zoom meetings before coming together on the stage to officially open the show.  The first award of the evening for Contemporary Gospel Album of the Year went to Koryn Hawthorne for her record “I Am.” Next up were performances from gospel legend CeCe Winans, Tasha Layton and popular new group CAIN.  “A Week Away,” directed by Roman White, took home the award for Inspirational Film of the Year, followed by the award for Gospel Artist of the Year which was presented to CeCe Winans for the 24th Dove Award win of her long career.  “I feel so encouraged,” Winans said backstage, “and it reminds us that the word of God is always relevant.” Co-host Jonathan McReynolds took to the stage with Mali for a performance of their songs “Best Thing” and “Jump Ship,” and later GMA sweetheart Lauren Daigle returned to the Dove Awards stage...
Lipscomb pivots from mask mandate to recommendation

Lipscomb pivots from mask mandate to recommendation

After several months of campus-wide indoor mask requirements, Lipscomb is moving to an indoor mask recommendation, effective Oct. 16. Lipscomb students and faculty were alerted of the upcoming change via an email sent out Thursday afternoon ahead of the fall break long weekend. The relaxed guidelines are a result of a decrease in COVID numbers campus-wide. “Due to your diligence, we have seen a significant decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases and individuals in isolation or quarantine. As a result, effective Saturday, Oct. 16, the updated mask policy is that masks will no longer be mandatory but will be recommended,” said the email sent to the Lipscomb community. While masks will no longer be required indoors, they will still be worn inside in certain situations. Faculty may still choose to require facial coverings in any of their respective classes and labs. Anyone preparing or serving food in a group setting must also wear a mask. Another exception to the rule is that anyone who is asked to put on a mask by someone within six feet of them is required to comply. “When requested in good faith by a Lipscomb student, faculty, staff member or guest who is presently wearing a mask indoors, a Lipscomb student, faculty, staff member or guest who is within six feet is required to wear a mask,” according to the statement prepared by the university. Lipscomb will continue to offer vaccination clinics with both the flu and COVID-19 vaccines every Tuesday and Wednesday afternoon in Bennett Campus Center. Lumination will continue to provide updates about Lipscomb’s COVID...
GALLERY: Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returns for 2021

GALLERY: Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returns for 2021

The Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival returned to The Park at Harlinsdale Farm in Franklin, Tennessee on September 25 and 26 after a yearlong hiatus. The festival, founded by Better Than Ezra frontman Kevin Griffin, hosted performances from artists such as local favorites Katie Pruitt and Cage the Elephant as well as bands such as Khruangbin and Dave Matthews Band. Check out the gallery below shot by Hannah Cron and read a recap of the weekend here.       Katie Pruitt « ‹ of 23 › »...
REVIEW: Lorde’s ‘Solar Power’ is a sunny album that falls short of expectations

REVIEW: Lorde’s ‘Solar Power’ is a sunny album that falls short of expectations

Solar Power, the third album from the New Zealand artist Lorde, was released on Aug. 20. It serves as a sunny departure from her previous work, including 2017’s critically-acclaimed album, Melodrama. The new album reunites Lorde with musician and producer Jack Antonoff (fun., Bleachers) who is best known for producing multiple award-winning albums from the likes of St. Vincent, Carly Rae Jepsen, Lana Del Rey and Taylor Swift. On Solar Power, Lorde trades in the dark, complex sounds and lyrics of her older music for something more akin to what Sheryl Crow was doing in the early 2000s. Solar Power shows Lorde taking clearer inspirations from her influences, including her own mother’s poetry and ‘70s folk music. Solar Power makes the perfect soundtrack for a day at the beach, but it isn’t one that will stay on your mind long after it finishes. It’s a pretty album but predictable and unfortunately forgettable. Many critics and music fans have been accused of disliking Solar Power as it isn’t a “sad” album or because Lorde appears to be writing from a more optimistic and less relatable point of view. While it is possible that some people feel this way, the album’s main issue – especially in comparison to Melodrama – is that it simply isn’t complex. Melodrama wasn’t great because it was sad; it was renowned for its complexity of sound and how each of the songs on the album was unique but still cohesive. Likewise, Solar Power isn’t bad because it is happier – in fact, it really isn’t bad at all. It’s just simple and sometimes a bit boring. None of...
Lipscomb’s Olympic press vets look at COVID and media changes in Tokyo 2020

Lipscomb’s Olympic press vets look at COVID and media changes in Tokyo 2020

A Lipscomb administrator and veteran of Olympic press coverage said this year’s 2020 Tokyo Games — occurring beneath the shadow of COVID that delayed the competition a year and with strict pandemic alterations in effect — could be the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel. Kim Chaudoin, Lipscomb’s assistant vice president of public relations and communication,  covered a variety of events at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta and forecasts a likely positive impact as the world takes a step toward recovery in Tokyo. “I mean, they were able to have the NCAA tournament,” said Chaudoin, noting those basketball competitions that were held in a bubble in Indianapolis this year after being canceled in 2020. “I know this is a lot more people, but I hope that they’re able to do it. “But hey, if they survive all that and then the big melting pot of it, then maybe you know it’s like, ‘Oh, OK, we’re all good now.’” The Games feature more than 11,000 athletes from more than 200 countries. The Tokyo 2020 Olympics – which were not renamed despite the year-long delay caused by the COVID pandemic – has athletes competing in 339 events across 33 sports. New sports for the Tokyo Games include surfing, skateboarding, sport climbing, karate, baseball and softball. While some might consider the Olympics occurrence as a positive step toward normalcy in the unpredictable pandemic, this year’s Games are anything but normal. The city of Tokyo has been in a state of emergency multiple times in the past weeks due to a resurgence of COVID cases. A year ago, if the games...