Lipscomb cancels all in-person classes for remainder of semester and commencement

Lipscomb cancels all in-person classes for remainder of semester and commencement

Following the White House’s recommendation that gatherings of 10 or more people be canceled or postponed, Lipscomb University officials made the decision to extend online instruction for the rest of the spring semester in the wake of growing concern over the coronavirus.  “This difficult and unprecedented decision – one being faced by colleges and universities throughout the country – was made with the health, wellbeing and safety of our students, faculty and staff in mind,” said President Lowry in an email sent Wednesday afternoon. In addition to the extension in remote learning, on-campus residence halls will no longer be available to students unless they have no other option for housing. Not only will on-campus residences be closed, but students will also not be able to return to Lipscomb to move out their remaining belongings until the university puts together a procedure to streamline this process. For those students whose only choice is to return to campus, life will be much different as a mandatory curfew will be put into place and many on-campus locations will be closed. “Dining options on campus will be significantly limited, primarily to grab-and-go options at one location, and recreational opportunities will be unavailable, including those in the Student Activities Center,” said Dr. Lowry. While Lipscomb had already announced the cancellation of all university events through April 30th, adding to the list of cancellations is that of spring commencement, which was set to take place on May 2nd in Allen Arena. Degrees will still be conferred, but graduates will be unable to walk across the stage to reduce the number at gatherings of 50 or...
LIVE UPDATES: Lipscomb extends online instruction for rest of spring semester, cancels commencement and closes dorms

LIVE UPDATES: Lipscomb extends online instruction for rest of spring semester, cancels commencement and closes dorms

MARCH 18, 2020 Following the White House’s recommendation that gatherings of 10 or more people be canceled or postponed, Lipscomb University officials made the decision to extend online instruction for the rest of the spring semester in the wake of growing concern over the coronavirus.  “This difficult and unprecedented decision – one being faced by colleges and universities throughout the country – was made with the health, wellbeing and safety of our students, faculty and staff in mind,” said President Lowry in an email sent Wednesday afternoon. Commencement has been canceled for spring 2020 graduates and the dorms are sending students home. Click here to read the rest of the story.  MARCH 15, 2020 Thanks to concerns over the coronavirus, the week after spring break this year will be one unlike any Lipscomb has ever experienced. The university announced the following for the week of March 23-27: Undergraduate students will have an extended week of spring break. Graduate classes will resume; programs will determine the format. Faculty will report to campus to transition classes to a remote teaching and learning environment. In a presentation to faculty and staff on Thursday, President Randy Lowry said that “‘closing’ is not a very good word for this.” “We are open and will at some level stay open because we have certain kinds of needs we need to meet for our students,” Lowry said. Click here to read the full story. MARCH 12, 2020 Lipscomb University has announced an extended spring break running until March 27th for undergraduate students. The information was delivered in an email to the Lipscomb community from the office of...
Lipscomb takes precautions to keep students and faculty safe from the coronavirus

Lipscomb takes precautions to keep students and faculty safe from the coronavirus

Just two days after Lipscomb canceled all spring break mission trips due to concerns over the coronavirus, the COVID-19 virus made its first appearance in Tennessee just south of Lipscomb’s campus. Despite this announcement from Gov. Bill Lee Thursday morning, as well as Williamson County’s immediate precautions to cancel all school for Friday and Monday to deep-clean all facilities, President Randy Lowry informed faculty in an email that there were no cases of the virus nor were there any significant risks reported on Lipscomb’s campus. Even though there is no direct threat to Lipscomb right now, Lowry did announce the precautions Lipscomb has already taken, which include the relocation of the Florence study abroad students and the aforementioned cancellation of all spring break international mission trips, as well as new restrictions and recommendations that the school is implementing. Of these restrictions, the most notable is the travel ban that is being enforced on students and faculty. The terms as presented in the email are listed below: “In terms of employee business-related travel and other school-sponsored travel, such is fully restricted until further notice to any country or area that meets any of the following criteria: Has a rating by the CDC at a Level 2 or higher, or  Has a rating by the U.S. Department of State at a Level 3 or higher, or  Is restricting or banning travel. Any employee or student who independently visits a location that meets any of these criteria is restricted from campus for a 14-day isolation period. If this situation applies to you, employees should inform your supervisor and students should inform Dr....
Nashville tornado relief — Here’s how you can help

Nashville tornado relief — Here’s how you can help

In light of the deadly tornado ripping through Nashville and Middle Tennessee early Tuesday morning, Lipscomb students are left wondering, “How can I help?” Christin Shatzer and Al Sturgeon offer a few suggestions. Shatzer, associate professor of general education and director of Lipscomb’s SALT program (Service And Learning Together), suggests students sign up with Hands on Nashville or the United Way of Greater Nashville to be involved with relief efforts. These charitable organizations, alongside others, offer means of donating both time and funding towards Nashville’s tornado disaster recovery efforts. Hands on Nashville works closely with the city of Nashville and the Office of Emergency Situations to collect and distribute funds for disaster management, as well as offer an easy online sign up for anyone looking to volunteer towards clean up and recovery. “Typically in any disaster response the best way to help is through monetary donation,” Shatzer said. “City leaders are suggesting that financial donations be made to the Community Foundation to help with disaster relief efforts.” Another alternative offered to aid the city of Nashville and those affected by the tornado is prayer, something Lipscomb placed a large emphasis on at The Gathering on Tuesday. “When we learned of the terrible losses in our local community, we decided to cancel our scheduled speakers at The Gathering because we felt it appropriate that we simply gather together and pray,” said Sturgeon, vice president of student life and dean of students. Sturgeon encourages students to email Student Life with prayer requests for anyone they may know who has been affected by the tornado. “In the immediate aftermath of a disaster,...
Tornado outbreak in Nashville area claims more than 20 lives; Students moved to safety

Tornado outbreak in Nashville area claims more than 20 lives; Students moved to safety

A deadly tornado roared through Middle Tennessee in the early hours Tuesday, leveling homes, businesses and schools and leaving around 50,000 households and businesses without power.  The danger caused Lipscomb to take precautions for students. After the National Weather Service announced the tornado warning for Davidson County around 12:35 a.m., Lipscomb residents were evacuated from their dorms to safe locations on campus. “I started hearing the weather alert on my phone, and then maybe 10 minutes later they said for Johnson Hall to go down to the basement,” said Lipscomb senior Kate Holt. “They [the RAs] were very calm about it.” AP News is reporting at least 22 deaths in Tennessee due to the EF-3 tornado, which had winds measured around 160 mph. The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency on Tuesday declared a level-three state of emergency for Tennessee. President Donald Trump is scheduled to visit Tennessee on Friday. Vice President of Student Life Al Sturgeon emailed Lipscomb students early Tuesday. “Our hearts are with everyone affected by last night’s storms in our Nashville community,” Sturgeon wrote. “Our Security & Safety and Housing & Residence Life departments were up all night keeping watch over campus while several of us monitored the storm.” The lack of sleep after the students were evacuated to safer locales worried Holt.  “This [the storm] could affect someone who has midterms, class, or even an internship they have to perform well in,” Holt said. But the students’ safety came first, considering the widespread violence of the deadly storm. “We have already received reports from employees who have been impacted by the severe weather,” said Vice President of...
SUPER TUESDAY: Overnight tornado damage rips through city, affecting polling locations for local voters

SUPER TUESDAY: Overnight tornado damage rips through city, affecting polling locations for local voters

Nashville sustained significant damage early Tuesday morning, as a line of severe storms and a tornado hit the neighborhoods of Germantown and East Nashville.  The tornado continued eastward to hit in Donelson and Hermitage before causing major damage in Mt. Juliet and moving across to Cookeville and Putnam County, where there was a devastating loss of life. The effects of the storm are being felt across Middle Tennessee and altering polling locations for voters in today’s election. Voters who normally are assigned to Hadley Park Community Center, Robert Churchwell Elementary, Centennial Park Art Center, Fifteenth Avenue Baptist Church, or Union Hall 737 may vote at Pearl Cohn High School. Voters assigned to  Hermitage Presbyterian, Dupont Tyler School, Hermitage Hills Baptist Church, Hermitage Community Center, TN School for the Blind or Two Rivers Middle School can vote at Donelson Presbyterian. Those assigned to vote at Ross Elementary, East Community Center, Shelby Community Center, Martha O’Brian or Cora Howe School may vote at Cleveland Community Center. Haynes Middle School will vote at Whites Creek Fire Station 25. Looby Community Center will vote at Northwest YMCA. Lead Brick Church Middle School will vote at Bellshire Elementary. Tuesday morning, Davidson and Wilson County polls were scheduled to open at 7 a.m. but were delayed until 8 a.m. Some were staying later than the normal 7 p.m. also, meaning Super Tuesday primary results will come in later than normal. Any other Davidson County voter whose assigned polling location was impacted can vote at the Election Commission Offices at 1417 Murfreesboro Pike or 800 Second Avenue S. For a full list of information to find your...