Go: a call to be the hands and feet of Jesus in Guatemala

Go: a call to be the hands and feet of Jesus in Guatemala

Go. The call seems so strong. Go. Go to Guatemala, and be the hands and feet of Jesus. Go serve with passion and purpose, knowing that the Lord is going before you and is with you every step of the way. Then why has the journey to get here been so hard? Let me tell you a story. I remember sitting on the bench outside of Dr. Bradshaw’s office at 7:30 in the morning each day during the fall semester of my freshmen year to work on my homework (lol #ambitiousfreshman). Dr. Bradshaw (true to character) struck up a conversation with me. That exchange ended with this statement: “Elizabeth, you should apply for the Guatemala team.” And the rest was history. As I sit here in Guatemala right now, I’m reminded of how thankful I am for this mission trip. Being a part of this team for three years has been one of my only constants of my time here at Lipscomb. Semesters bring about new classes, new friends, healing and brokenness, but the Guatemala team has been the community that has been there through it all. Through this trip, I have been reminded of my passion for medicine, and the physical and spiritual healing it can provide. This year started out just like every other year. Our team started meeting in early October, and we spent a ton of time building community and preparing for the adventure that awaited us. GoFundme pages started popping up all over my Facebook page––everything seemed to be pretty normal. Then, as is typical of junior year, everything hit the fan: -Due to...
‘A Wrinkle in Time’ has diverse cast that uplifts overall underwhelming film

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ has diverse cast that uplifts overall underwhelming film

In 1962, Madeleine L’Engle was told that her complex children’s book, “A Wrinkle in Time” would be a huge flop. Publishers told her that children couldn’t grasp the intricate science presented in the story, and they were averse to the idea of a female preteen being the lead of a sci-fi adventure. They felt that young boys– the main market for science fiction– wouldn’t be interested in a story about a girl. Luckily, the small publishing company Farrar, Straus & Giroux took a risk on “A Wrinkle in Time.” The novel was a massive hit, which is why, 56 years later, Disney gave a budget of $103 million to director Ava DuVernay to adapt the now-beloved book into a cinematic adventure. In DuVernay’s adaption, Meg Murry (Storm Reid) is a shy, rebellious high schooler whose father went missing three years prior. Her younger brother, Charles Wallace Murry (Deric McCabe) is a child prodigy who was adopted by the family right before the disappearance of their father. After a bad day at school where Meg was sent to the Principal’s office for lashing out against a bully, her family is visited by an eccentrically-dressed woman named Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon). The next day, while Meg is walking the dog with Charles Wallace, they run into Calvin O’keefe (Levi Miller) a popular kid at school who, with no explanation other than, “I feel like I should be here,” decides to go with Meg and Charles Wallace as they explore an abandoned house. The house ends up being the home to Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling). Later on, while relaxing in Meg’s backyard,...
Lipscomb cheerleaders react to first win at ASUN Championship

Lipscomb cheerleaders react to first win at ASUN Championship

It’s Thursday, March 1, in Allen Arena. The Bisons have just trounced the Jacksonville Dolphins in the conference tournament to stamp their ticket to the ASUN championship game for the first time in 12 years. Now, it’s time to celebrate. The cheerleading team is screaming so loud my ears are ringing beccause we all know what happens next. We have one day to prepare to jump on a plane and takeoff for Ft. Myers, Florida, to take on the No. 1 seeded Eagles. Head cheerleading coach Sherie Eubanks quickly hands out our flight assignments with itineraries, and I run home to start packing for my 5 a.m. flight on Saturday morning. I can’t sleep that night because I am so excited about getting the opportunity to cheer in the Conference Championship game my senior year. On Saturday morning, my teammates roll into the airport one by one, exhausted but so ecstatic for this new opportunity. Our flight takes us to Chicago where we have a three hour layover, and then we are just hours away from our destination and warm, sandy beaches. We arrive at our condo on the beach around 8:00 that night, and we are all so pumped up about the big game on Sunday, we rush to bed like kids on Christmas Eve awaiting their many presents. This is what we have been dreaming of all season, and it is just within our grasp. The Sunday of the game is hectic. We drive to eat, and the streets are flooded with blue and green in anticipation for the championship game. People along the streets and in...
Column: Lipscomb finally breaks into NCAA tourney after long, disappointing road

Column: Lipscomb finally breaks into NCAA tourney after long, disappointing road

FORT MYERS, Fla. – On March 4, 2006, the Belmont basketball team topped Lipscomb in the ASUN championship game, using a three-point play from Justin Hare and a strong overtime performance to squeak out a 74-69 victory. Exactly 12 years later, the Lipscomb basketball team was back in the title game, and it wasn’t going to be denied this time around. The Bisons used a 60-point first half to build a sizable lead, only to have to hold on for a 108-96 victory over Florida Gulf Coast on Sunday at Alico Arena. The difference the second time around? Head coach Casey Alexander, who was an assistant at Belmont when the Bruins advanced to their first NCAA tournament by sending the Bisons packing in 2006. The Belmont ties to the Lipscomb coaching staff (also including assistants Roger Idstrom and Steve Drabyn) have been well documented when the Battle of the Boulevard rolls around each year. In fact, the Belmont-Lipscomb games generally bring boatloads of media attention to both schools. What hasn’t been as well-documented? The Lipscomb basketball team when they aren’t playing Belmont. One glance at press row during a typical ASUN conference game yields two broadcasters, a Lumination Network staffer and occasionally a member of the local Nashville media. Since that fateful day in 2006, Belmont and Lipscomb went in opposite directions. The Bruins qualified for six additional NCAA tournaments while the Bisons watched on television. In turn, Belmont has largely overshadowed Lipscomb on the court over the last decade. That changed this season. Behind a pair of Battle of the Boulevard victories, the 2017-18 edition of the Lipscomb basketball team appeared...
Olivia’s Way: How to let go

Olivia’s Way: How to let go

The “grown-up” world is scary. It’s unknown, uncharted territory, but hopefully with the help of this article, moving on to the next phase of your life will be a little bit easier. With graduation rapidly approaching, the thought of moving on is haunting me. Even amid all my nightly homework, presentations and the all-around stress of my classes, all I can think about is my impending move to New York–and unemployment. I know, I hate that word too. It makes my “perfectionist self” cringe and stirs up all those old feelings of failure. The thing is, you don’t have to be a senior to understand these feelings. In 5th grade, the 6th grade terrified me more than anything. Now, what terrifies me is what comes after walking across stage in Allen Arena in my cap and gown. For other students, it might be the unease of knowing Lipscomb isn’t the place for you and finding the right school that is. Sometimes that terrifying thing could be taking Intro to Communications, pledging a club, or studying abroad. There are so many things that are completely unknown, but the good news is, the brave people before you have survived these new phases. You’re probably wondering how. I was too until I came across two beautiful words: letting go. This doesn’t mean that you should let your grades slip, but it does mean that we all deserve some space from ourselves. With all the pressure we put on ourselves, it’s no wonder that we end up shaving 5 years off of our lives after each year comes to a close. We all...
‘Black Panther’ trail-blazes powerful message in latest Marvel movie

‘Black Panther’ trail-blazes powerful message in latest Marvel movie

A new king of Wakanda is crowned in the latest entry into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. “Black Panther” is written and directed by Ryan Coogler (Creed) and stars Chadwick Boseman as the Black Panther himself. Boseman first made his appearance in this role in “Captain American: Civil War.” Now his character, T’challa, returns home to Wakanda after the death of his father. Here, he takes over the role of king, a position his father held before him. As king, T’challa presides over a country thought to be one of the most underdeveloped in the world, when in fact it is the most advanced. T’challa does not feel ready to take on this major role, but he does what he must anyway. This is where his internal struggle of identity originates. Lupita Nyong’o plays the role Nakia, a character that left her country in order to work as a foreign aid independent of Wakanda. Her character also serves as an influential love interest to T’challa. The relationship between T’challa and Nakia is one of the most interesting dynamics in the movie. The two have opposing views on how the nation of Wakanda should be run. They balance each other out well, providing dialogue between them in many scenes. The country of Wakanda and its leader face the outside threat of a character named Klaue played by Andy Serkis. Klaue has been smuggling a valuable material called Vibranium out of Wakanda to sell it to anyone willing to pay his price. Vibranium is the strongest material in the world of Marvel and was used to advance the technology and weapons of...