“Enola Holmes”: A tale filled with action, feminism and a hint of mystery

“Enola Holmes”: A tale filled with action, feminism and a hint of mystery

From jumping off trains to using jujitsu against a hired killer, Enola Holmes is a nonstop period film filled with comedy, action and fourth-wall-breaking. Based on the Young Adult series The Enola Holmes Mysteries by Nancy Springer, the film adapts the plot of the first book, The Case of the Missing Marquess. The Netflix film was directed by Harry Bradbeer, written by Jack Thorne and stars Millie Bobby Brown as the positively witty Enola Holmes. Enola wakes on her 16th birthday to find her mother (Helen Bonham Carter) missing, which causes her to reunite with her estranged older brothers, Sherlock (Henry Cavill) and Mycroft (Sam Claflin). Once Mycroft observes the environment of Enola’s upbringing and her behavior, he becomes determined to send Enola to boarding school. While she attempts to evade her brothers, Enola sets off to find her mother. During her journey to London, she crosses paths with Viscount Tewkesbury and finds herself involved in a second mystery. Who is trying to kill the young Viscount and why? Enola Holmes is a young teen that defies the 19th-century societal norms of women. Instead of teaching embroidery, her mother taught her about literature and science. Enola was raised to be independent. After all, Enola spelled backward is “alone.” She is a clever, yet humorous protagonist with a mind smart enough to rival Sherlock. With Brown’s charming performance and Enola’s constant 4th wall-breaking asides, Enola Holmes is quite enjoyable for family movie night. The story centers on themes of feminism and social activism. A big yet underlying part of the plot is the women’s suffrage movement and their attempt to...
‘Belmont Boys’ take the trophy at SAB’s Halloweek dodgeball tournament

‘Belmont Boys’ take the trophy at SAB’s Halloweek dodgeball tournament

The tradition of Halloweek dodgeball remained strong at Friday night’s SAB tournament, despite an era of social distancing and masks causing a switch-up for the Lipscomb favorite. This year’s dodgeball tournament was moved to Allen Arena to better socially distance. This year’s winners were the “Belmont Boys,” a group of five Lipscomb sophomores aiming to poke fun at our neighbors up the boulevard. “It feels good. We worked really hard and put a lot of work into this, we came prepared and we got the job done,” said the group after their win. The “Belmont Boys” are comprised of Greyson Isenberg, Cody Neill, Blake Crockett, Jeffrey Martin and Jackson Tate. “It really just comes down to execution. We had a plan, so we came out and got the job done.” A gallery of the event, including groups dressed as grandmas, yoga enthusiasts and rednecks, can be found...
COVID sends Halloweek Dodgeball to arena

COVID sends Halloweek Dodgeball to arena

Lipscomb’s Halloweek is having to endure COVID-19 regulations, but the majority of the events that Lipscomb has come to love and know are still happening. Normally, dodgeball would be in the courtyard of Fanning Hall. COVID-19 forced Lipscomb to consider different venues for the event before deciding to change the location to Allen Arena. “The decision was purely based on COVID protocols,” said Lipscomb’s Director of Community Life Kelvin Kelley. “We knew that this is a big part of the Lipscomb Student experience and wanted to ensure that it could happen, even if it looks a little different.” Just because the event location has changed doesn’t mean that the protocols have either. Lipscomb will follow the latest COVID-19 protocols at the event to ensure that no one is able to catch the virus at the event or for it to spread. Allen Arena is a much bigger location than the likes of Fanning Hall so there had to be an extra level of caution, but it’s nothing that can’t be handled. “We will have a contract tracing,” said Kelley. “Also, we will add temperature scanners to entrances. Everyone also has to RSVP for tickets within Allen Arena and must sit in the seat they have reserved.” Unfortunately due to COVID, one thing that has to be changed is the number of people that will be able to attend this event. SGA will allow for 300 people to attend this event via the reservation of tickets. The number of teams that are allowed for the event is currently at 16 teams. While Kelley stated there are no plans as of...
Album Review: Taylor Swift shows off a new perspective and an old sound on folklore

Album Review: Taylor Swift shows off a new perspective and an old sound on folklore

For my first review, I selected Taylor Swift’s surprise eighth album, folklore. It was announced less than 24 hours before its release on July 24. The album features 16 tracks plus one bonus on the deluxe edition. On folklore, Swift ventures into new genres such as indie, alt-rock and folk and even calls back to her country past. Upon its release, folklore received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics, longtime fans and newcomers alike. Stand-Out Tracks “the 1” – This is not your typical breakup song. Rather than looking back with sadness or anger, “the 1” reminisces fondly about how enjoyable it might have been if things had been different and there had never been a breakup. It offers a refreshingly different perspective, one that is mature but still lighthearted and fun. “exile (feat. Bon Iver)” – Swift’s duet with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver is her best duet since Red (by the way, I am referring to “The Last Time” because I have taste). Swift and Vernon trade verses about how they feel betrayed and misunderstood in a failing relationship. The piano on this song is absolutely gorgeous, and Swift’s and Vernon’s voices combine beautifully despite being very different. “invisible string” – One of the brighter songs on a generally dreary album, “invisible string” sees Swift muse about all of the little moments in her life that brought her to where she is today in the context of her relationships. The song is mature and sweet. Thanks to her Nashville namedrop, I will now always remember Centennial Park not as the park with the fake Parthenon, but the park Taylor Swift sang about. J Overall Thoughts I am a...
COVID-19 scare spooks away Haunted Highrise and changes Halloween celebrations

COVID-19 scare spooks away Haunted Highrise and changes Halloween celebrations

Halloween spirits on Lipscomb’s campus have not gone unaffected by the COVID pandemic. Some of the events that have traditionally been held are Haunted Highrise, Dodgeball, Scare in the Square and Dia de los Muertos among others. However, due to COVID-19, there will be some changes, including the cancellation of Haunted Highrise. “The reality of COVID-19 and the safety of our students has been the primary factor in most all of our decisions this year,” said Lipscomb’s Director of Residence Life Jonathan Williams. “The fact that we are located in Nashville and Davidson County further complicates any plans we might have for hosting a larger event,” he said. “At this time, Davidson County is still in phase 3 of reopening which limits gatherings to 25 people or less so an indoor event such as Haunted High Rise, that would normally draw 400-plus students and guests, simply wasn’t going to work this year.” Haunted Highrise, an annual event since 2011, will return — if possible — from this year’s cancellation, according to Williams. Williams said, “We are crossing our fingers and hoping for the best as we look forward to the future and fall 2021.” On the other hand, another prominent event of Hallo-week, Scare in the Square will still go on, but the atmosphere has been changed. Under normal circumstances, Scare in the Square is like a trunk or treat event where different clubs and societies of Lipscomb set up various stations and give out candy to those from throughout the community who come in costume. This is an event that all of Lipscomb is invited to partake in,...
No red carpet this year as COVID forces Dove Awards to try new format

No red carpet this year as COVID forces Dove Awards to try new format

In a normal October, the red carpet would be rolling out and leading into Allen Arena for the Gospel Music Association’s Dove Awards. This is not a normal October. The 51st GMA Dove Awards will not be hosted at Lipscomb; in fact, there will be no venue hosting the Dove Awards, as the COVID-19 pandemic has forced the awards show to be completely virtual, with planners trying to package it differently than a typical awards show. The gospel awards show has taken place in Lipscomb’s Allen Arena for the past seven years, and the organizers hope to be able to come back to Allen Arena in 2021. Doves producer Justin Fratt said organizers wanted to take a different approach for this year’s awards to stand out from other virtual awards shows and to maintain the relevance and power of this event. “When planning, we were thinking about what would be different, but still very compelling,” said Fratt. “We didn’t want to do it like others — we’ve seen awards shows utilizing Zoom. This will be a musical feature that celebrates the music and the message.” The planning started in the spring, and the show was recorded in mid-September at TBN studios in Hendersonville. It took three weeks to record the show, said Fratt, adding there are performances and interviews with artists, who will share stories of faith and how gospel music has gotten them through these trying times. As far as the Dove Awards’ plans to return to Lipscomb next year: it looks like it’s a go.  “As long as we can, we would love to gather again at...