Audience members experience A Heavenly View with Elevate Dance Show

Audience members experience A Heavenly View with Elevate Dance Show

The stars and the sky were the inspiration for The Elevate Dance Show by The Foundation Dance Theatre (FDT). The show reminds audience members to always look up with A Heavenly View. The Elevate Dance show was a 3-day event (March 6-8) held at Bennet Campus Center in Shamblin Auditorium. Dancers, who are part of this company and the theatre department had the chance to share what they have been rehearsing since the fall. There were group dances and duets with styles that varied from ballet, tap, jazz and hip hop. The FDT company is under the direction of Kari Smith & Leigh Anne Ervin who lead all students during the year. During the show, in between dances, a video would be shown of Kari Smith explaining the principles of the FDT. Kari Smith who is an instructor for the company states there are five pillars they want their students to understand. Leaning into these pillars during their time with the company. Storytelling, Education, Endurance, Passion, and Artistry. As one dance ended a video would be shown to explain each pillar, but also show behind the scenes footage of these dancers. “Dance is a big part of musical theatre but, dance is kinda a different world than theatre. They all fall under storytelling but, with dance, it’s very universal,” said sophomore musical theatre major Drew Flickinger. “I auditioned for FDT in the fall of my freshman year and they took a shot at me, so I got to do elevate last year and I really loved it so of course, I did it again.” Flickinger appeared in four out...
Disney and Pixar’s newest film, Onward, holds a magic-filled-tale that takes the viewer on a journey full of laughs, growth, and forgiveness

Disney and Pixar’s newest film, Onward, holds a magic-filled-tale that takes the viewer on a journey full of laughs, growth, and forgiveness

Onward features a family of elves with who lost their father before their youngest son was born. Ian Lightfoot, voiced by Tom Holland, and older brother Barley, voiced by Chris Pratt, are two brothers who could not be more different. Single mom Laurel, voiced by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, has done her best to raise them in little New Mushroomtown. This is a world full of mythical creatures that have found a content life living without their gifts from nature. Magic has long been forgotten in favor of a more efficient and easier solution: Technology. The film begins on Ian’s 16th birthday, when the viewer sees him living a life with which he’s not quite satisfied. His shy tendencies, and not to mention his embarrassing older brother, make it hard for him to feel accepted and comfortable at school. Laurel reveals that their father had left behind a gift for the two sons, only to be given to them once they were both older than 16: A wizard’s staff, an enchanted stone and a spell to bring back their beloved dad for one whole day. Ian turns out to have a natural talent at casting spells, and is able to bring back their father. Well, the lower half of him. With the enchanted stone destroyed, the boys must embark on a quest to find another stone in order to bring back the entirety father before time runs out. Barley, who has a passion for table-top magic games, Ian with the wizard’s staff, and the hilarious pair of legs that is their father head out on their journey in order to be...
Creator of The Proud Family, Bruce W. Smith, visits Lipscomb to share advice and stories

Creator of The Proud Family, Bruce W. Smith, visits Lipscomb to share advice and stories

Friday night, Lipscomb hosted animator Bruce W. Smith, who won an Academy Award for the animated short “Hair Love” and created the Disney Channel series The Proud Family. Smith spoke about his background, his time as an animator (including why he creates media featuring black stories) and gave some information on the upcoming reboot of The Proud Family on Disney+. Smith grew up in Los Angeles and fell in love with animating from a young age. Drawing was contrary to the culture of the area, and that fueled him to create more. “I was a kid who just loved to draw and had to eventually find an outlet for it,” said Smith. “I grew up in L.A. in gang culture, and you had to assimilate and fit in. You have to learn.” Smith credits his mom for inspiring him to continue to draw despite the community around him. He used her likeness and personality as inspiration for the character Suga Mama in The Proud Family. This desire to create only grew when he started animating professionally, but this time he knew what stories he wanted to tell. He noticed that black representation in animation was few and far between. “I realize that our animation business is probably made up of three to five percent African Americans,” said Smith. “Therefore, you won’t get a lot of African American content on the screen from an African American standpoint because the people aren’t there at the table to put us in primary parts of films.” Smith directed “Bebe’s Kids”, one of the first animated films to feature African Americans in a prominent...
REVIEW: Lipscomb’s College of Entertainment presents, Kindertransport

REVIEW: Lipscomb’s College of Entertainment presents, Kindertransport

Bring your tissues. As described aptly in the College of Entertainment and the Arts emails, “Kindertransport depicts the agony of separating a child from her parents and wrestles with the consequences of that choice, an act of sacrifice that also wreaks devastating results.”  “Kindertransport is a play that deals with personal relationships, trauma, and mental health in the interpersonal lives of people who are going through a much bigger trauma,” said Emma Harvey, lead actress in the production. Kindertransport addresses a moment in history when children were sent out and away from Nazi Germany, by Jewish families who wished for a better chance of survival for their children. The production, full of complexities in crossing timelines, follows the path of one such child. Eva Schlesinger feeling abandoned, unable to communicate in English arrives in England. After her parents fail to escape Nazi Germany, she is adopted by her host family, the Millers, and raised as their own. While struggling to keep the Ratcatcher, an embodiment of her fears, at bay she grows into her new life, and 30 years later, her daughter, Faith, discovers old letters and papers bringing back the Ratcatcher and the pain to the present. The Ratcatcher plays a key role in Eva’s PTSD. What once was her favorite story has been turned into a nightmare personifying the trauma and fear that she experiences, feeling the need to be grateful and the mentality of “grin and bear it” burying the emotional crisis deeper into her subconscious. “It’s also about refugee crises,” said Harvey, echoing the words of Scott Baker, the literary advisor for the production, from...
Her Voice: Selections from the Cheekwood Collections

Her Voice: Selections from the Cheekwood Collections

“Her Voice: Selections from the Cheekwood Collections” is honoring the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States and the 60th anniversary of Cheekwood as a public institution. The exhibit is on display through March 30 in the John C. Hutcheson Gallery in the Beaman Library. These pieces, on loan for the Lipscomb display at Hutcheson Gallery, were donated to Cheekwood over the course of its history. Cheekwood, 1200 Forrest Park Drive in Nashville’s exclusive Belle Meade enclave, is a 55-acre botanical garden and art museum on the historic Cheek estate. “Originally built as the home of Leslie and Mabel Cheek in 1929, Cheekwood is one of the finest examples of an American Country Place Era estate,” according to its web page. “Since being converted into a museum of art and botanical garden in 1960, Cheekwood has presented world-class art exhibitions, spectacular gardens and an historic estate unlike anything else.”  This exhibition at Lipscomb highlights Cheekwood’s long-standing legacy of collecting works by female artists. It displays the voices, creative innovations, and the voices of remarkable women. The gallery includes work by Ida Rittenberg Kohlmeyer, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jane Peterson, Liliane Lijn, Grace Hill Turnbull, Helen Frankenthaler, Dorothy O’Connor, Marilyn Murphy, Betty Woodman, Perle Fine, Louise Dahl-Wolfe and more. Only four of these artists — Lijn, Murphy, O’Connor and Marylyn Ditenfass  — are living, according to  Mia Jaye Thomas, the gallery assistant for the John C. Hutcheson gallery and the administrative assistant for the School of Art and Design. The exhibit was curated by Campbell Mobley, Cheekwood’s curator of exhibitions. It is being staged in conjunction with the 100th anniversary...
REVIEW: Little Women reminds us of the timelessness of Alcott’s novel

REVIEW: Little Women reminds us of the timelessness of Alcott’s novel

Based on the novel of the same name, Little Women explores the complexities of life through the four March sisters. Director Greta Gerwig artfully recreates Louisa May Alcott’s classic and weaves together a beautiful and visually powerful film. Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, and Eliza Scanlen headline as Jo, Meg, Amy, and Beth March alongside Timothee Chalamet as Laurie, Meryl Streep as Aunt March, and Laura Dern as Mother “Marmie” March. The chemistry between these actresses and their faithful representations of their characters endear viewers to this family with all of its triumphs and struggles. Jo, an aspiring writer, struggles with discovering her voice, debating between the popular sensationalized drama and the real stories that move and drive our lives. Through love, sadness, separation, disagreements, and the trials of growing up, she can find clarity and discover what she truly wants in life.  Alcott’s and Gerwig’s intrinsic understanding of human nature is evident in this story and provides the timeless appeal of this piece. The characters are not afraid to expose their weaknesses alongside their accomplishments, and the family dynamics of the March family take viewers back to their childhoods. The relationships forged among characters welcome viewers into the family, evoking laughter, tears, and sympathetic sighs. The powerful seamlessness of the movie is created through the frame in which the story is told. Each scene comes full circle as it is told alongside flashbacks, giving the full story of the Marches. The juxtaposition of these scenes years apart sheds clarity on the growth of the family, collectively and individually. In addition, the very real and very relatable challenges...