Belmont’s aquisition of O’More College brings fashion competition next door

Belmont’s aquisition of O’More College brings fashion competition next door

Lipscomb’s neighbor school Belmont University announced in early February their acquisition of the O’More College of Design, currently located in Franklin, Tennessee. The expansion will commence in Fall 2018 and will add three new design majors to Belmont’s undergraduate program. The competition between Lipscomb and Belmont is deeply-rooted and this acquisition has the potential to spark major changes on Lipscomb’s campus. The almost 50-years old O’More College will be shutting the doors to its Franklin school, and students will have the choice to commute to Belmont’s campus. Editorial and News Content Director at Belmont, April Hefner, gave an official statement regarding the transition. “Belmont is proud to welcome new programs in interior design, fashion design and fashion merchandising when O’More joins our campus this fall,” Hefner said. “Our design communications major will also see an expansion with the influx of O’More graphic design students.” O’More was founded with interior design roots and has a fully accredited interior design program while Lipscomb has a minor interior design program that is not popular among students. However, the other design majors Belmont is collecting have yet to be accredited, leaving Lipscomb and its fully-accredited fashion program a major step ahead. Kathy Bates, the Chair of the Fashion and Design program at Lipscomb, taught a few adjunct classes at the O’More College of Fashion and Design several years ago and shared how she thinks Lipscomb will stand next to Belmont’s addition. “We have been the only one in Nashville that’s a fully accredited university that has a fully accredited fashion program,” Bates said. “I feel like we have pretty good ground to stand...
Lipscomb to host 55th-annual Singarama, ‘It Takes Two’

Lipscomb to host 55th-annual Singarama, ‘It Takes Two’

Lipscomb will host its 55th Singarama in Collins Alumni Auditorium on April 5, 6 and 7. This year’s theme is “It Takes Two.” The musical production will feature both individual and collective musical performances from hosts Berkley Boglin, Luke Howard, Madeline McPherson, Hudson Parker, Peytan Porter and Savannah Stewart. “I’m excited to see the shows,” Parker said, adding that rehearsing with the other hosts and hostesses is “a blast.” Vince Law, a Singarama director, is most looking forward to the first performance, when everything comes together. “Aaron and Laurie Sain are looking to push the production to the next level,” Law said. “They’re definitely holding the writers to a higher standard.” Law’s show’s theme is “Name and Address,” which features social clubs Alpha Zeta, Gamma Lambda, Phi Sigma and Sigma Iota Delta. “Fun and Games” is the theme of another show, which will be performed by social clubs Delta Omega, Delta Sigma, Delta Nu, Sigma Omega Sigma and Tau Phi. “Rise and Fall” is the final show, featuring Kappa Chi, Phi Nu, Pi Delta and Theta Psi. Lipscomb holds a nostalgic place in its heart for Singarama. Every year, students, alumni, friends and family members pack Collins Alumni Auditorium to witness the production. For some students, like Law, the performance is special because it’s his senior year. For others, like Parker, the show is sentimental because it’s an important piece of his family’s past. Not only was his brother, Grant, a host in last year’s performance, but his father, Blake Parker, was also a host during his junior and senior years nearly 30 years ago. “I literally wouldn’t be alive if it weren’t for Singarama,”...
‘A Wrinkle in Time’ has diverse cast that uplifts overall underwhelming film

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ has diverse cast that uplifts overall underwhelming film

In 1962, Madeleine L’Engle was told that her complex children’s book, “A Wrinkle in Time” would be a huge flop. Publishers told her that children couldn’t grasp the intricate science presented in the story, and they were averse to the idea of a female preteen being the lead of a sci-fi adventure. They felt that young boys– the main market for science fiction– wouldn’t be interested in a story about a girl. Luckily, the small publishing company Farrar, Straus & Giroux took a risk on “A Wrinkle in Time.” The novel was a massive hit, which is why, 56 years later, Disney gave a budget of $103 million to director Ava DuVernay to adapt the now-beloved book into a cinematic adventure. In DuVernay’s adaption, Meg Murry (Storm Reid) is a shy, rebellious high schooler whose father went missing three years prior. Her younger brother, Charles Wallace Murry (Deric McCabe) is a child prodigy who was adopted by the family right before the disappearance of their father. After a bad day at school where Meg was sent to the Principal’s office for lashing out against a bully, her family is visited by an eccentrically-dressed woman named Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon). The next day, while Meg is walking the dog with Charles Wallace, they run into Calvin O’keefe (Levi Miller) a popular kid at school who, with no explanation other than, “I feel like I should be here,” decides to go with Meg and Charles Wallace as they explore an abandoned house. The house ends up being the home to Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling). Later on, while relaxing in Meg’s backyard,...
Lipscomb Theatre to open ‘On the Verge’ Friday

Lipscomb Theatre to open ‘On the Verge’ Friday

The Lipscomb Theatre Department opens its spring season with “On the Verge” Friday at 7:30 p.m in Shamblin Theatre. Lipscomb Theatre is no stranger to unique productions, and “On the Verge” certainly isn’t a typical household show name. Instead of drawing a big-name Broadway production from a hat, Lipscomb Theatre chose a show that will give its audiences something new and refreshing. “I think audiences will find a wonderful break from their daily routine that invites them to use parts of their minds and imaginations that get neglected far too often,” said Scott Baker, head of marketing. “I think they’ll get to consider well how to see things from another person’s point of view.” Directed by Evelyn O’Neal Brush, this Eric Overmyer play tells the story of three female Victorian explorers adventuring a newly discovered land. As their journey begins, unexpected developments occur, placing the show’s comedy front and center. “’On the Verge’ stands out to me firstly because of its focus on three distinctly-drawn, strong, independent women who are bucking the conventions and expectations of their day,”  stated Brush. “They are capable, empowered, and confident in who they are. They also happen to be hilarious. I think audiences will totally fall in love with their quirks and their strength.” The play features a four-person cast: Emily Meinerding (Fanny), Mary Elizabeth Roberts (Mary), Bekah Stogner (Alex) and JT Friend, who plays a whopping eight characters. Brush described this group of performers as “a true ensemble: they support, encourage, and reenergize each other throughout the whole show.” The production will stay faithful to the original show’s script, but will provide an added...
‘Black Panther’ trail-blazes powerful message in latest Marvel movie

‘Black Panther’ trail-blazes powerful message in latest Marvel movie

A new king of Wakanda is crowned in the latest entry into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. “Black Panther” is written and directed by Ryan Coogler (Creed) and stars Chadwick Boseman as the Black Panther himself. Boseman first made his appearance in this role in “Captain American: Civil War.” Now his character, T’challa, returns home to Wakanda after the death of his father. Here, he takes over the role of king, a position his father held before him. As king, T’challa presides over a country thought to be one of the most underdeveloped in the world, when in fact it is the most advanced. T’challa does not feel ready to take on this major role, but he does what he must anyway. This is where his internal struggle of identity originates. Lupita Nyong’o plays the role Nakia, a character that left her country in order to work as a foreign aid independent of Wakanda. Her character also serves as an influential love interest to T’challa. The relationship between T’challa and Nakia is one of the most interesting dynamics in the movie. The two have opposing views on how the nation of Wakanda should be run. They balance each other out well, providing dialogue between them in many scenes. The country of Wakanda and its leader face the outside threat of a character named Klaue played by Andy Serkis. Klaue has been smuggling a valuable material called Vibranium out of Wakanda to sell it to anyone willing to pay his price. Vibranium is the strongest material in the world of Marvel and was used to advance the technology and weapons of...
Shinn Center construction delayed for two more months

Shinn Center construction delayed for two more months

Construction on the Shinn Center will not begin for at least two months due to a storm drain in the building’s planned footprint that must be rerouted, Director of Campus Construction Mike Engelman told Lumination Network. The University originally planned to break ground early last fall, according to a press release from June. Engelman estimated that the building will be completed in July 2019 at the earliest. The release stated that event booking for the center “has already begun with an anticipated opening in the fall of 2018.” University spokeswoman Kim Chaudoin said there are no events booked for the Center, despite the press release. In an emailed statement to Lumination Network, Mike Fernandez, dean of the College of Entertainment and the Arts, said, “We had begun the process of creating a season of offerings.” “We are still excited about these plans but have stretched booking dates to a more realistic opening timeline to accommodate the change in construction,” Fernandez wrote. Engelman said the entire Ezell lot will be closed while the Shinn Center is built. It is unknown how the drain rerouting will affect parking. The current drain sits in front of the Ezell Center, right where the Shinn Center will be built. Junior CEA student Christian Bean will graduate before the Center is completed. Regardless, he said he is excited for his younger classmates who will benefit from it. “Some of our classrooms, right now, are overcrowded, so it is kind of needed,” Bean said. The film production major clarified that this wasn’t a “huge issue,” but that “as the film department grows, it’s going to really...