Lipscomb features Mustafa Akyol on “Islam Without Extremes”

Lipscomb features Mustafa Akyol on “Islam Without Extremes”

Author and journalist Mustafa Akyol visited Lipscomb Thursday night and spoke on his book “Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim case for liberty” at 7:00 p.m. in Stowe Hall. Akyol is a Turkey native who has visited the U.S. on many occasions. On one of his first trips to the States, he experienced McDonald’s pancakes for the first time. He recalled his affinity for the breakfast food and how he mistakenly thought pancakes were exclusive to McDonald’s. “Years later, I took a lesson from that story,” Akyol said. “Foreign culture might be a little confusing when you meet it for the first time. If you misunderstand the cuisine, it’s not that difficult. “But when you are confused about the values, religions and customs of another culture, there might be a larger gap to fill.” Akyol attributes this misunderstanding of cultures to the media’s portrayal of different societies. Especially since 9/11, he says many people have made inaccurate assumptions about Islam based off of the actions of the terrorists. “The fanatics attract our attention more than the normal people trying to go about their lives,” he said. “Islam was there for 14 centuries, with good and bad parts, but terrorism was never mentioned until the past 30 years.” The extremists that cause fear in America are very few, and they are threats to everyone “that isn’t them,” Akyol said. Akyol said the term “jihad,” to Muslims is like the word “crusade,” to Christians; its original definition had nothing to do with killing innocent people, he said, but the extremists redefined it, turning it into a terrorist doctrine in the minds of Americans. According...
The Gathering sheds light on new intercultural initiative

The Gathering sheds light on new intercultural initiative

In Tuesday’s Gathering in Allen Arena, various faculty introduced Lipscomb’s new intercultural initiative, LIGHT, to the student body. Dr. Terry Briley, donning the new, free LIGHT T-shirt, recalled the story of the Good Samaritan. “Jesus doesn’t delve into the long-standing feud between the Jews and Samaritans,” Briley said. “Instead, he asks the question, ‘Which person was the neighbor to the wounded man?'” Briley announced that the heart of Jesus’ parable was that Christians are to treat others with mercy, which is also the concept behind the LIGHT program. Briley says the LIGHT program is geared toward breaking down walls of hostility. “We are to see the light, be the light and call others to that light.” Dr. Kimberly Reed followed Briley, articulating the more technical aspect of the program. She shared that every 10 years, the university attempts re-accreditation. As a part of that process, Lipscomb presents a Quality Enhance Plan that articulates the school’s mission and programs that will be offered to help achieve that mission. “Lipscomb is accredited,” Reed said. “It signals to the world that we meet standards.” These standards Reed mentioned include not only academic rigor, but also character development. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools will visit Lipscomb’s campus to better understand the proposed QEP. The LIGHT program will not interfere with graduation requirements. Some courses will be marketed now as LIGHT courses, events will count for LIGHT credits and students can choose to be LIGHT scholars based on their participation with the program. The ultimate goal of the program, Reed said, is to become more comfortable with communicating with those different from...
Lipscomb’s Nordista Freeze to open for Moriah Peters

Lipscomb’s Nordista Freeze to open for Moriah Peters

Sophomore contemporary music major Nordista Freeze has not been silent about his big plans for the spring semester. Freeze, who has been making waves in Nashville’s up-and-coming music community, has been performing in various venues across Tennessee’s capital and touring across the country, bringing his music into the homes of friends he has made at Lipscomb. His next performance is set for this Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. in Shamblin Theatre, as he opens for Christian artist Moriah Peters. Mid-December, Freeze was asked to represent Lipscomb on tour with for King and Country, a band whose tour the university sponsored. “What that meant for us was that they could send a representative,” Freeze said. “We could set up a booth with information about Lipscomb, specifically the College of Entertainment and the Arts. Right before intermission, I’d go up and say a minute about Lipscomb to the crowd.” Freeze, a performer who was used to crowds, said he was still slightly intimidated by the large audiences. “I was pretty nervous. I can get up and shake my hips, you know, I can get up and dance around and be myself. But when I knew that Lipscomb was putting in a lot of time and effort sending me to do this, it’s just hard to be genuine when you’re just promoting a school. No one knows who you are, they’re just like, ‘I’m here to see a show,’ and you’re like, ‘Hey guys, have you heard of Lipscomb?’” Though Freeze spent most of his time on tour with the tech crew, he had an all-access pass. He got to know the Australian brothers...
President Lowry ushers in new semester with ‘Respect Leads’

President Lowry ushers in new semester with ‘Respect Leads’

For the first Tuesday morning chapel of the Spring 2017 semester, President Randy Lowry updated students on the campus’ construction and made some special announcements about the upcoming year. Lowry announced that the new engineering building is now open, but it is still incomplete. The new parking lot adjacent to it is neither open nor complete, but those in charge of the project found a way to expand the lot by 60 parking spots. The construction team is scheduled to pour the asphalt once the weather warms up. Transitioning into his chapel message, Lowry shared an anecdote that stressed the importance of unity. He announced that the upcoming chapels will be geared toward achieving a sense of community. “Jesus calls us to be a community unified,” Lowry said. “People on the outside don’t understand it. We begin to have that community by having respect for one another.” He told an anecdote similar to that of the Good Samaritan in order to emphasize that, despite our differences, we are all part of God’s creation, and must respect one another in order to achieve the sense of community. Lowry warned that the following chapel speakers might present issues the student body might not feel comfortable talking about, let alone agree with. “The key,” Lowry emphasized, “is respect.” Scheduled keynote speakers include Christian musician Moriah Peters and former NBA star Magic Johnson. Lowry also spoke of controversial issues as situations that needed addressing. “We will respond to difficult moments because it’s the right thing to do.” In having diverse chapel speakers, Lowry hopes this will help the student body understand multiple viewpoints, have respect for...
Contemporary Music 2016 Showcase photo gallery

Contemporary Music 2016 Showcase photo gallery

The Contemporary Music Program is a fairly new department. Since its start just last year, the department has nearly tripled in size. Because of this, the department split into three ensembles to perform their fall concerts on different days in different locations. The first group performed Nov. 7 in the Flatt Amphitheater. They showcased a lot of talent from the freshmen new to the program. The second group’s performance took place Monday night on the steps of Collins Alumni Auditorium. The final group performed in the Collins Auditorium Thursday night. All of the students thought it went extremely well. “It went better than we were all thinking,” sophomore Jacalyn Thompson said. “You do these things with all this adrenaline thinking about all the things you have to do, but as soon as you’re on stage, everyone comes together with the same mindset that we’re gonna make this the best show that we can.” Photos by Anna Rogers   « ‹ 1 of 2 ›...