Second Stage Student Theatre ‘Really Really’ photo gallery

Second Stage Student Theatre ‘Really Really’ photo gallery

Opening March 23, student-founded theatre collective Second Stage Student Theatre will premiere the play “Really Really” at the Darkhorse Theatre. The play by Paul Downs Colaizzo shows the complications among a college-age friend group when one of them accuses another of assaulting her at a party. Though controversial in nature, the play speaks on relevant topics, which is why director and junior Natalie Risk kept the harsh material in the show. She and the founders of 2SST hope their portrayal of these events sparks conversation about assault prevention on campuses. After each showing, there will be a talkback with professionals from the Nashville area who deal with these situations. “Really Really” runs March 23-25 at 7:30 p.m. To preorder tickets, visit the event page.     « ‹ 1 of 5 › »   Photos by Anna...
Second Stage Student Theatre to premiere ‘Really Really’ this weekend

Second Stage Student Theatre to premiere ‘Really Really’ this weekend

Comprised entirely of Lipscomb students, Second Stage Student Theatre is a completely student-run theatre company whose goal is to create art and challenge society. Founded in 2016 by juniors Scott Wilson, Morgan Bowling, and senior Bekah Purifoy, 2SST exists to give theatre students a medium of uncensored, challenging artistic expression. “We use Second Stage as a vehicle to create art,” Wilson said. Many theatres have a second stage. The second stage traditionally produces shows under the same theatre program, but 2SST is not Lipscomb-affiliated Though typically under the same program as the main stage, a second stage show does not usually receive the same attention as a main stage show. “We wanted to take that a step further,” Wilson said. Wilson said that establishing the company was not solely to further their careers or to brag on a resume. The goal is to struggle and learn how to express themselves independently. Opening Thursday at the Darkhorse Theatre, Second Stage will be producing “Really Really,” a show by Paul Downs Colaizzo. This controversial show is about a character who accuses her friend of sexually assaulting her at a college party and the gray area that ensues. The play features some racy themes, crude language and sexual innuendos. “Mentioning that makes it harder to sell,” junior Connor Weaver, who plays Davis, said. “It could be triggering, but theatre is raw.” Even though each member of the team attends Lipscomb, the cast and crew decided to leave these controversial messages in the show. Junior and director Natalie Risk made this decision because the things that happen in the story are happening in the real...
Special Olympics 2016 basketball tournament photo gallery

Special Olympics 2016 basketball tournament photo gallery

Stands were filled with supporters and spectators as Lipscomb University hosted the Special Olympics basketball tournament Friday and Saturday in Allen Arena. The competition featured athletes from different cities in Tennessee who came together to play, coach and cheer. Teams were allowed up to two helper players to participate in the games.     Photos by Whitney Smith...
Lipscomb features Mustafa Akyol on “Islam Without Extremes”

Lipscomb features Mustafa Akyol on “Islam Without Extremes”

Author and journalist Mustafa Akyol visited Lipscomb Thursday night and spoke on his book “Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim case for liberty” at 7:00 p.m. in Stowe Hall. Akyol is a Turkey native who has visited the U.S. on many occasions. On one of his first trips to the States, he experienced McDonald’s pancakes for the first time. He recalled his affinity for the breakfast food and how he mistakenly thought pancakes were exclusive to McDonald’s. “Years later, I took a lesson from that story,” Akyol said. “Foreign culture might be a little confusing when you meet it for the first time. If you misunderstand the cuisine, it’s not that difficult. “But when you are confused about the values, religions and customs of another culture, there might be a larger gap to fill.” Akyol attributes this misunderstanding of cultures to the media’s portrayal of different societies. Especially since 9/11, he says many people have made inaccurate assumptions about Islam based off of the actions of the terrorists. “The fanatics attract our attention more than the normal people trying to go about their lives,” he said. “Islam was there for 14 centuries, with good and bad parts, but terrorism was never mentioned until the past 30 years.” The extremists that cause fear in America are very few, and they are threats to everyone “that isn’t them,” Akyol said. Akyol said the term “jihad,” to Muslims is like the word “crusade,” to Christians; its original definition had nothing to do with killing innocent people, he said, but the extremists redefined it, turning it into a terrorist doctrine in the minds of Americans. According...
The Gathering sheds light on new intercultural initiative

The Gathering sheds light on new intercultural initiative

In Tuesday’s Gathering in Allen Arena, various faculty introduced Lipscomb’s new intercultural initiative, LIGHT, to the student body. Dr. Terry Briley, donning the new, free LIGHT T-shirt, recalled the story of the Good Samaritan. “Jesus doesn’t delve into the long-standing feud between the Jews and Samaritans,” Briley said. “Instead, he asks the question, ‘Which person was the neighbor to the wounded man?'” Briley announced that the heart of Jesus’ parable was that Christians are to treat others with mercy, which is also the concept behind the LIGHT program. Briley says the LIGHT program is geared toward breaking down walls of hostility. “We are to see the light, be the light and call others to that light.” Dr. Kimberly Reed followed Briley, articulating the more technical aspect of the program. She shared that every 10 years, the university attempts re-accreditation. As a part of that process, Lipscomb presents a Quality Enhance Plan that articulates the school’s mission and programs that will be offered to help achieve that mission. “Lipscomb is accredited,” Reed said. “It signals to the world that we meet standards.” These standards Reed mentioned include not only academic rigor, but also character development. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools will visit Lipscomb’s campus to better understand the proposed QEP. The LIGHT program will not interfere with graduation requirements. Some courses will be marketed now as LIGHT courses, events will count for LIGHT credits and students can choose to be LIGHT scholars based on their participation with the program. The ultimate goal of the program, Reed said, is to become more comfortable with communicating with those different from...