Security office announces self-defense class; Brandon Steele speaks at ‘The Gathering’

Security office announces self-defense class; Brandon Steele speaks at ‘The Gathering’

After the lights dimmed in Allen Arena this Thursday to kick off this week’s unorthodox Gathering, a representative of Lipscomb security announced that they are partnering with the student-led organization You’re Not Alone to offer a self-defense class. The course will be open to students on April 24 in Swang 108. This opportunity comes at an appropriate time, since the Green Hills neighborhood was rocked by a local shooting back in February. This, combined with other crimes on Lipscomb’s campus, has led to minor security changes, such as the closing of an entrance to campus after hours. After the announcement of the free course, The Gathering officially began with worship and a prayer. Brandon Steele then greeted the audience with an anecdote about speaking to a couple on the verge of a divorce. “I don’t know if you’ve ever had this moment,” Steele said, “where you’re talking to someone, and they get this look that they’ve already made up their mind on what they’re gonna do.” He explained that in talking to this couple, no matter how desperately he plead for them to fight for their marriage, he could tell that the young couple had already mentally decided they had given up. Steele asked those in the audience who had already made up their minds about Jesus and rejected faith to suspend that judgment temporarily. He focused on those who might have had negative experiences within the church. Remember, it’s not Jesus who hurt you,” he said. “It’s people.” He compared a relationship with Jesus to a first date. No one, he said, goes on one date with someone...
Presidential candidates Drake, Sparks make their cases at SGA debate

Presidential candidates Drake, Sparks make their cases at SGA debate

Lumination Network teamed up with Lipscomb’s Student Government Association (SGA) to host the 2018 SGA Presidential debate this Monday. Sitting on the stage of Zebi’s Lounge were SGA Presidential candidates Ralston Drake and Sierra Sparks.  The typically-quiet hangout in the heart of the student center was bustling with candidates and their peers eagerly waiting to hear more about the candidates and their platforms.  Moderator Lindsey Nance introduced all of the students running for the position of senator before giving each of the executive candidates 30 seconds to introduce themselves and offer reasons why they feel qualified for the positions they are pursuing.  Running for the position of treasurer, Emilee Goss and Matt Welborn both spoke of their desires to work on behalf of the students. Goss emphasized allocating the budget to best fit the needs of the student body. Welborn agreed, adding, “I saw an opportunity to combine my passions of hard work and organization for students.” On a similar note, Macy Glassco, secretary hopeful, said, “I’ve been able to use my gifts and talents to make goals happen.” Her competitor, Deanie Pedigo, highlighted the need to keep SGA organized so that they can more efficiently help students.  Both Annie Moore and Jack Webber campaigning for the office of vice president gave messages similar in tone, affirming their plans that helped achieve the ultimate goal of making Lipscomb a better place for enrolled and potential students. Since Webber is studying abroad in Santiago, Chile, Glassco read his pre-written statement to the audience.  The more challenging questions were reserved for the presidential candidates. When Nance asked the two current SGA members...
Andy Crouch challenges students in ‘The Gathering’ to flourish

Andy Crouch challenges students in ‘The Gathering’ to flourish

Tuesday’s Gathering chapel featured a message and advice from Andy Crouch on how students can put themselves in situations in which they can thrive. “Turn to your neighbor and talk about a time when you were fully alive,” he said, “a time when you were flourishing. I want to describe to you what all experiences of flourishing have in common.” He spoke of two qualities: authority and vulnerability. He described authority as “the capacity for meaningful action,” and flourishing as “exposure to meaningful risk.” He made a graph to show the relationship to the two components. There were four quadrants divided by an “X” and “Y” axis. The horizontal line was labeled “vulnerability,” and the vertical, “authority.” “When both are high,” he explained, indicating the upper quadrant on the right, “you have great flourishing.” More than that, Crouch said he wanted to focus on the other three corners. In the opposite corner of flourishing, he labeled the quadrant “safety.” This corner was low in both authority and vulnerability. “You’re not being asked to do anything,” he said. “You’re not risking anything. Every parent wants to have their child start off in this, in safety.” Crouch went on to explain that the safe quadrant is where some people start, and most hope to grow out of. As people grow, he said, they become more exposed. Crouch related this to his daughter who recently turned 18 years old. As she will soon be moving away from home, he said she will be exposed to more authority and risk. “That’s the way a healthy life is supposed to go,” Crouch said. The...
Special ‘The Gathering’ held to observe Good Friday

Special ‘The Gathering’ held to observe Good Friday

Lipscomb hosted an unique chapel service Friday in order for campus to assemble in observation of Good Friday. The Chapel office informed students and faculty at the beginning of Holy Week that Friday’s 11 a.m. classes would be cancelled for the service, and students in attendance would receive two chapel credits. The service began with a short video of various peers detailing what reconciliation through Christ meant to them, personally. Then, campus minister Cyrus Eaton took the podium, explaining the magnitude of the pre-Easter holiday. “[Good Friday] reminds us that reconciliation is the act of restoring what was broken or lost, and that only God can bring peace and justice in the midst of chaos and corruption,” Eaton said. The overall message was one of forgiveness and restoration through the Gospel, with a heavy emphasis on Jesus’ death. Eaton went on to explain that in order to give or receive forgiveness, sacrifice is crucial. While there is good news of resurrection on Easter, Eaton noted the solemnity of Good Friday. “Good Friday asks us to take a hard look into darkness,” Eaton said. Following Eaton’s message, three Lipscomb students read the story of Jesus’ betrayal and death from the Gospel of Luke. In response, the Gathering sang, “O Sacred Head,” a hymn originally written in the Middle Ages about the sacrifice God made in sending Jesus to Earth to die to reconcile humanity after sin. Dr. Ken Durham took to the stage, and his message focused specifically on God’s power over death. “Death makes a pretty convincing case,” he said. “It has a pretty impressive finality about it.” Durham...
Former cop and innocent convict share message of reconciliation in ‘The Gathering’

Former cop and innocent convict share message of reconciliation in ‘The Gathering’

Tuesday’s “The Gathering” featured Lee Camp sharing the story of reconciliation between Andrew Collins and Jameel McGee. Camp interviewed the two men about how they met. Collins, a former police officer in Benton Harbor, Michigan, saw McGee walking down the street one day. Since his day was coming to a close, and he had put no one behind bars, he wrongfully arrested McGee, claiming he saw the law-abiding citizen with drugs and the intent to sell. McGee faced four years in prison after being charged with possession of one ounce of crack cocaine. “I felt like I was guilty until innocent,” McGee said. “Everyone thought I was guilty right off the bat…even my family thought I was guilty.” While McGee was still locked up, Collins was found out and charged with falsifying reports and lying under oath. This earned him a year in jail. “It was almost immediately after I was caught that I started getting the old me back,” Collins said. “When I was in jail, I felt God was calling me back to Benton Harbor to seek reconciliation . . . Everyone thought I was crazy and needed to flee.” To everyone’s bewilderment, Collins returned to the city in which his crimes took place. There, he began working through a faith-based employment agency. As luck, or Providence, would have it, it was the same agency McGee used. Instead of doing what most people would do and hurting, ignoring or harassing Collins, McGee chose to forgive him. “The situation was hurting me further,” McGee said. “I was hurting people in prison because I was hurt, and that was...