Governor candidates share higher ed priorities

Governor candidates share higher ed priorities

Bill Lee and Karl Dean will face off in the gubernatorial election tomorrow to succeed Tennessee governor Bill Haslam. Throughout the election, education has been at the forefront of debates and discussions. Over the past 16 years, governors Phil Bredesen and Bill Haslam have worked hard to improve higher education policy, implementing rograms like Tennessee Promise, which provides tuition-free community college for qualified applicants Due to the Tennessee Promise program and other initiatives, the state in 2017 had the highest rate of applicants for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in the nation. Tennessee’s next governor will he expected to build on this progress. Dean and Lee have both promised to prioritize Tennessee’s education system if they are elected to office. Dean, who served as Nashville’s mayor from 2007 to 2015, is the Democratic nominee. He publicly praised Haslam for his work with the Tennessee Promise program. In fact, Dean created public-private support for free community college before Tennessee Promise was implemented statewide. Although Dean supports Tennessee’s current focus on increasing the number of college graduates, he also wants to increase access to vocational training programs. These training programs will align with the fast-growing occupations and industries of Tennessee. Republican nominee Bill Lee is the president of Lee Co., a home services business worth $250 million. He also served on the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and Belmont University’s Board of Trustees. Lee’s diverse experience with business and higher education has led him to advocate for vocational, technical and agricultural education in Tennessee. During his campaign, he stressed the importance of providing opportunities for all Tennesseans, including those...
Men’s soccer suffers tough loss against Memphis

Men’s soccer suffers tough loss against Memphis

The Lipscomb men’s soccer team lost 2-0 to the Memphis Tigers Tuesday night. Each team made runs throughout the first 45 minutes of the game, with midfield being an area of battle the majority of the first half. “I thought we did a poor job of locking down the midfield and sort of dictating the tempo and the rhythm of the game,” head coach Charles Morrow said. The first five minutes of the second half started with four corner kicks from the Memphis team, though they amounted to nothing. Scoring finally opened up on Memphis’ fifth corner kick. In the 64th minute, a Tiger launched the ball into the box, where Ben Roberts was able to find the net, giving Memphis a 1-0 lead. At the 71st minute, Memphis found room to dribble up the field and Alexandros Ierides was able to secure the second goal, adding to Memphis’ lead. For the remainder of the night, Lipscomb offense controlled possession of the ball but failed to score. Lipscomb will finish its season this Saturday at 7 p.m. against Stetson. “It’ll be very different in terms of any other team we have played this year,” Morrow said. “They play a little bit different shape, and so there is plenty preparation to get ready for that between now and Saturday.” Winning against Stetson this weekend would finish Lipscomb’s ASUN regular season championship. It would also insure the Bisons stay home during the ASUN...
Tennessee Performing Arts Center performs The Play That Goes Wrong’ very ‘right’

Tennessee Performing Arts Center performs The Play That Goes Wrong’ very ‘right’

As one of the longest-running Broadway plays, “The Play That Goes Wrong” has entertained audiences for several years now. Last night’s premiere at the Tennessee Performing Arts Center was no exception. Before the play begins, the cast has audience members reeling with laughter. As everyone took their seats, stagehands hurriedly worked to finish the set on stage, which continued to “fall apart.” One audience member is even called on stage to hold up a mantlepiece that refuses to stay on the wall. To help set the scene, Chris Bean proudly introduces “Murder of Haversham Manor,” a whodunit being produced by the inexperienced Cornley University Drama Society. He shares with the audience previous plays the society has put on including “The Lion and the Wardrobe” and “Cat” — an indication to the quality of performance the audience will witness. Although cast members forget their cues, props go missing and the set comes crashing down, “The Play That Goes Wrong” features many skilled actors and actresses. In fact, the actors are very good at being bad. The hilarious banter and sometimes shocking physical requirements of the play grabbed the audience’s attention. At one point in the evening, a part of the set is knocked down and leaves two cast members balancing themselves to avoid falling. This scene caused many audible gasps and left the crowd impressed with the strenuous effort involved. This hilarious play is sure to captivate a wide variety of audience members and provide a great night of entertainment. Rating: 4 out of 4 For more information on how to get tickets, visit TPAC’s website and follow them on...
TPAC’s ‘The Play That Goes Wrong’ set to hit the Nashville stage tonight

TPAC’s ‘The Play That Goes Wrong’ set to hit the Nashville stage tonight

Today Broadway’s award-winning comedy, “The Play That Goes Wrong”, will take center stage at The Tennessee Performing Arts Center (TPAC). Created by England’s Mischief Theatre, “The Play That Goes Wrong,”  follows the classic murder mystery “Murder at Haversham Manor” and its disastrous opening night. Throughout the night, actors forget lines, cues are missed and chaos ensues. “Hearing an audience roar with laughter for two hours at every performance is such a rush.  Knowing we’re bringing that kind of unadulterated joy to so many people every day feels quite special,” said Ned Noyes. Ned Noyes began his acting career as far back as elementary school and began his professional career while enrolled at Northwestern University. Currently Noyes plays the role of Max in “The Play That Goes Wrong.” “I was fortunate enough to see the original Mischief Theatre company perform this play many times, and I was so taken by everyone’s performances.  Max was an easy favorite, as he’s afforded many opportunities to “misbehave” in ways you’re never permitted to as a professional actor.  It’s a once-in-a-lifetime kind of role, and a total joy to perform his journey every night.” Earlier this year Noyes had the opportunity to perform his role in the Broadway production of “The Play That Goes Wrong.” To him the experience was: “A dream come true!  Everyone working on this show has such a huge heart and being part of the first American cast of this show was thrilling.” Lipscomb students are invited to see what the talk is all about starting this Tuesday, Oct. 9th. TPAC is offering students a ticket code that can be...
Gerron Hurt swapped out textbooks for kitchen utensils in MasterChef victory

Gerron Hurt swapped out textbooks for kitchen utensils in MasterChef victory

Gerron Hurt saw his hard work pay off as he took home the coveted MasterChef title on season nine of Fox’s hit series. The Nashville resident, who has taught English has at Nashville’s LEAD Academy High School, won $250,000 in prize money on Sept. 19. “Throughout the season, Gerron displayed the drive and characteristics we so often ask of one another and, especially, our students,” said LEAD Academy’s CEO Dwayne Tucker. “He was courageous in trying out for the show in the first place. He was committed, disciplined and self-reliant in his approach to the competition and the way in which he talked about his students and his passion for them was the very definition of serving others.” Hurt received a Master’s degree in teaching at Lipscomb University and a ESL certification last spring. Hurt said he appreciates his time at Lipscomb for the relevant tools he received and strong foundation it provided. “Lipscomb’s program really really prepared me to be able to truly accommodate my ELL students and differentiate my lesson plans accordingly,” said Hurt. Impressively, Hurt was able to complete his Mater’s program while also filming MasterChef in Los Angeles. Moving from a classroom into the high pressure kitchen came with mixed emotions. Hurt still recalls the intimidation he felt cooking for famous chef and judge, Gordon Ramsay. “I actually cut myself the first time cooking in front of him because my nerves got the best of me,” said Hurt. In order to get past his fears, Hurt had to remind himself that Gordon was a regular person, just like him. He also focused on the support he received from...