Can You Hear the Ticking? Eli Roth brings children’s mystery film to the big screen

Can You Hear the Ticking? Eli Roth brings children’s mystery film to the big screen

The House With a Clock in Its Walls will enchant audience members with a magical storyline. Adapted from John Bellairs’ 1973 young adult book, this movie brings to life the whimsical adventures of a young boy named Lewis (Owen Vaccaro). Lewis, suddenly orphaned when his parents are killed in a car accident, moves in with his eccentric Uncle Jonathan (Jack Black). Jonathan lives in a gothic style Victorian home, the perfect setting for spooky adventures and mysterious happenings. Mrs. Zimmerman (Cate Blanchett), a neighbor, spends a good deal of time at the house too. Soon after settling into his new residence, Lewis discovers there is more going on than meets the eye. Magic. Uncle Jonathan and Mrs. Zimmerman happen to be a warlock and witch searching for a hidden clock hidden within the “haunted” home’s walls. (Hence the title of the movie.) The mystery revolves on the previous owners of the home, evil warlock Isaac Izard and his wife Selena. Both of whom died/disappeared a year earlier while creating a powerful clock full of dark magic. Lewis, Jonathan and Mrs. Zimmerman must stop the ticking noise before the evil magic of Izard erases history. Along the way to solving the mystery, Lewis faces challenges, acquires bravery, deals with bullies and learns the power of friendship.  At moments, there is too much going on, and the main storyline/mystery of the clock fall wayside to Lewis’ self discovery, making the mystery of the clock hidden inside the house feel like an afterthought. More refining of the script would have helped focus the story and keep audience members engaged. Shockingly, this movie was directed by Eli...
Lipscomb launches new academic programs, including Physician’s Assistant, Advertising, more

Lipscomb launches new academic programs, including Physician’s Assistant, Advertising, more

Lipscomb launched three new programs to enhance academic success around campus this fall: Physician’s Assistant, masters in Health Administration and B.A. in Advertising. Additionally, a hospitality program is expected to begin in 2019. Administration said the addition of these new programs is intended to draw in prospective students and provide more opportunities for current students. By expanding the university’s departments, Lipscomb becomes a more diverse learning institution capable of meeting the needs of increasing enrollment. “One benefit (to adding new courses) is reaching out to a broader base of prospective students, who are interested in careers that maybe we have not offered majors in so far,” communications professor Dr. Jimmy McCollum said. Perhaps the largest addition to campus, the School of Physician Assistant Studies, can be found on the west side of campus in the Hughes Building. The Hughes Building that was first dedicated to the art department was transformed over the summer into a facility conducive to the demands of a contemporary PA school. The new school is directed by Dr. Stephen Heffington. The program boasts a state-of-the-art gross anatomy Lab. Although these facilities are noticeable, faculty said there is also a large focus on clinical experience for students. “The curriculum is designed to teach the knowledge, skills and clinical competence necessary to practice in any area of medicine as a physician assistant,” Heffington said. “All students will be well-prepared to take the PA National Certifying Exam (PANCE).  Students will expect a very rigorous didactic curriculum (throughout the course of the program).” Students who have applied to the program expressed their own excitement about now being able to pursue...
Art gallery in Beaman Library wing provides a place for community

Art gallery in Beaman Library wing provides a place for community

The beginning of a new semester always brings about changes on Lipscomb’s campus. This year, one of those changes took place in one of Lipscomb’s longest standing buildings, Beaman Library. The need for an art gallery was driven by the art department’s transition from the James D. Hughes Center into Ward Hall. The Hughes Center is now home to Lipscomb’s new physician’s assistant program. Before renovations, the library’s first floor was dedicated to computer stations for both PC and Mac users. However, over the course of the summer the right wing transformed into the Hutcheson Gallery. The art gallery features two glass walls, allowing natural light to fill the room and a wrap-around bench for visitors to take in the artwork. Intentional design went into making this space inviting to students and the public. At first some students voiced concern about the renovation taking away valuable study space. “I was worried the art gallery would take away places to study and do homework, but there is still whole lot of room for learning. Although I do think Lipscomb could add more seating back there,” Lipscomb senior Hannah Hardman said. Although the space has been open since the first week of school, most students admit they were unaware the Hutcheson Gallery even existed. Unanimously students across campus agree that more advertising would have increased the gallery’s popularity around campus. Carissa Sevier says, “If there was more mention of it through other platforms, there would be more interest. I would have gone earlier if I had known about it.” In an effort to attract visitors, the public was invited to a...