Lipscomb students, staff prepare for inauguration

Lipscomb students, staff prepare for inauguration

(NASHVILLE, Tenn.) As president-elect Donald Trump takes his oath of office at 11 a.m. central time in Washington, Lipscomb students and Tennesseans have their own festivities planned in Nashville. Although polls released this week revealed that 45th president has a historically low approval rating for an incoming president, political science professor Dr. Marc Schwerdt said the inauguration has the potential to be another unique aspect of the Trump presidency. “I think the optics of this are going to be memorable even if his words are not especially, but then the contrast is going to be between his Twitter demeanor and his rally demeanor versus the temperament you’re expected to show from the actual backside of the Capitol building looking out over the mall,” Schwerdt said. “You’re looking for that Lincoln-type temperament. You’re not looking for that ringmaster from Barnum and Bailey.” Lipscomb junior Joel Cottrill cast his first vote in a presidential election for Trump and is ready to watch him take the Oval Office, despite Trump not being his first choice for the Republican Party. “I am somewhat excited for a Trump presidency, ” Cottrill said. “I think it’s a total change compared to where we have been even with previous Republicans. All major television networks will be broadcasting the inauguration such as ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, Univision and Telemundo, and the cable networks CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, Bloomberg and C-SPAN. For those looking to watch the event online, Youtube, the New York Times, the Washington Post, ABC, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News and NPR will be live streaming. The White House also offers a live stream. Lipscomb sophomore...
Donald Trump elected as 45th President of the United States

Donald Trump elected as 45th President of the United States

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has officially been announced as the winner of the 2016 presidential election. The reality television star and real estate mogul brought in 279 of the necessary 270 electoral votes needed to declare victory, according to the New York Times. “Nothing we want for our future is beyond our reach,” Trump said in his victory speech. “America will no longer settle for anything but the best. We will seek common ground, not hostility. Partnership, not conflict.” A Trump victory was unlikely in most pre-election polls, but by getting unexpected swing states such as Wisconsin and Michigan, Trump took the lead early in the evening. A restorative criminal justice and German double major, Joel Cottrell gave his support to Trump and is optimistic about his presidency. “It’s exciting,” Cottrell said. “I think we had a really close race. It was a little nerve-racking from time to time, but I think in the end I’m excited for what’s to come and to see the change that comes from that and see where we go from here.” Clinton supporter Sam Hearn is less optimistic about a future with Trump in the Oval Office. “I’m fearing most of the overwhelming wave of victory from a place of anger and disillusionment with what we are called to as people, much less as Christians,” Hearn said. “I just think there is going to be an overwhelming person to person sense of victory in things I really detest.” As the results rolled in throughout the night, other victories were in store for Republicans. The Republicans maintained control of Congress, with the Senate losing...
Former student-led newsletter resurfaces on campus

Former student-led newsletter resurfaces on campus

After eight years of silence, the Lipscomb Underground is back in circulation. The Lipscomb Underground is a newsletter that was founded in 1994 by former Lipscomb students Todd DuPriest and Justin King. According to their first issue, the Underground was meant to be a free and open-forum news source for Lipscomb’s campus, relying almost entirely on student discussion for its content.  In efforts to stay true to the original intent, the new host senior William Sisson wrote in the first issue since 2008, “This is college. We should be able to spread our ideas without fear of administrative retaliation.” One former contributor who knew the original hosts still calls Lipscomb’s campus home. Lipscomb’s Assistant Director of Security Patrick Cameron said the beginning of the Underground was far from an underground paper as it was once sent to the White House and the Space Shuttle.  “When I was an undergraduate, there were a couple of guys that I was good friends with: Justin King and Todd DuPriest, and Justin and Todd were the original founders of the Underground,” Cameron said. “Since I was good friends with both of them, I had the opportunity to contribute and to publish occasionally.” Senior and Lipscomb Underground subscriber Jay Klein is only a recent patron, and he says he sees the Underground’s role on campus as a facilitator and encourager of free-thinking and...
Lipscomb has largest budget in history despite lower enrollment

Lipscomb has largest budget in history despite lower enrollment

With Lipscomb’s largest graduating class walking across the stage in the spring, the students coming to Lipscomb this fall have big shoes to fill. Lipscomb reached its third highest enrollment with 4,554 students this year. Although this number is an increase from previous years, it is a decrease from last year’s 4,686 students. The university credits that decrease to graduating more students than ever. Darrell Duncan, the Associate Vice President of Finance, said that because Lipscomb does not officially set a budget for the upcoming year until the fall when they have the official enrollment numbers, the budget is still the largest in school history, but it’s smaller than what they had expected. “We wanted a higher enrollment than we got,” Duncan said. “Enrollment was actually down year over year, but it was in the top three of the school’s 125 year history. So on a grading scale, that’s an A+. “What’s happened is, because of Lipscomb’s success, we have a new measure of a new standard. The budget — actually, we were hoping it would go up by about 5% year over year — that was our hope going into the budget process, but when enrollment came in, we realized we can increase the budget 3% year over year; so the misinformation is it’s not a reduction over last year — it’s just less of an increase.” Since technically less of an increase does not indicate a decrease, Lipscomb’s enrollment is down, but its budget is not. For other areas of campus, Dr. Scott McDowell, Dean of Student Life, said the administration is careful in their planning to ensure...
Students leave final presidential debate watch party with solidified opinions

Students leave final presidential debate watch party with solidified opinions

Lipscomb’s political science department hosted another “Pizza and Politics” presidential debate watch party in Swang 110 on Wednesday evening for the last presidential debate before the election. Senior mechanical engineering and mathematics major, William Sisson said the third and final presidential debate differed from the prior two as both candidates were less aggressive in their attacks. “What you get is you have Trump being pushed less and less to be bombastic and to make himself look bad, and so I know there was a lot of criticism in the last debate about them being too antagonistic towards each other,” Sisson said. “I think Hillary backed off a little bit on that, and the result is that it ended up making Trump look a little bit better which is interesting.” Sophomore psychology major Jacqueline Herrera originally supported Sen. Bernie Sanders (I – Vt.) in the primaries, but shifted her support to who she felt represented her best on the issues when Sanders did not become the Democratic nominee. “I also looked at third parties and who was more inline to the side of the issues that I am passionate about, and overwhelmingly they all coincided or correlated with Hillary Clinton.” Herrera said. “Things like LGBT rights, immigration rights and things like that.” With early voting in Tennessee opening on October 19 and lasting until November 3rd, the votes are already rolling in. Many students are voting in their first presidential election, some students find themselves torn between both major party candidates and some are unwilling to vote for either. For history major Patrick Russell, choosing a candidates in this election reflects a deeper...