Lipscomb grad Patrick Carpenter releases new music

Lipscomb grad Patrick Carpenter releases new music

2016 Lipscomb graduate Patrick Carpenter is making his own mark on the country music industry. The communications major has a wide variety of interests — he coaches football for Franklin high school, served as the student radio sports director while in college, and he recently just returned to get his masters in education at Lipscomb. But music is his passion. He wants to be Brad Paisley. In July, he released his first EP on iTunes — “Coming Back Stronger,” reaching No. 13 on the Singer/Songwriter charts. Available for preorder on iTunes now, his latest single is titled “Baptized by the Whiskey.” The inspiration for this name came after he visited Ethos church– a church that meets at the Cannery Ballroom, a bar and music venue in Nashville that many Lipscomb students attend. One of Carpenter’s friends was baptized at this church, and, after he noticed the unique church setting, he nonchalantly commented she was “baptized by the whiskey.” A few years down the road and the ironic comment became the title of his latest single. Music has always been a very large part of Carpenter’s life. Starting at just the young age of 11, he picked up his first guitar and started playing. But his music journey hasn’t always been easy sailing. “I played for about a month or so, and I wanted to quit,” Carpenter said. “One night I was watching the CMT Crossroads, and I saw Richie Sambora who was the lead guitar player for Bon Jovi playing with them, and I was so impressed. He was so cool and different.” But if Carpenter had to single out just one...
Lipscomb students celebrate National Coming Out Day

Lipscomb students celebrate National Coming Out Day

In recognition of National Coming Out Day, Lipscomb’s LGBTQ+ students painted the Bison rainbow colors, standing around it from early morning until evening on Thursday in support of the LGBT community on campus. Throughout the day, doughnuts were handed out, faces were painted and conversations took place. “This is about the freedom to be who you are, especially on this campus,” student Aria Bartley said. “There’s a difference between acceptance and supporting, and although not everyone is going to be supportive, this is about learning to accept everyone for who they are.” The students had conversations with the student body and sought to educate outsiders on what it means to be a part of the LGBT community to anybody who stopped by the community gathering around the Bison. “This is a day where we get to be outwardly who we are and celebrate that,” student Lis Leudemann said. “We also encourage other people who are too afraid of the Lipscomb environment to come out and join.” Last year on Coming Out Day, the Bison was painted over by a different student after it had already been painted rainbow colors by students in the LGBT community. This year, the gesture went over more peacefully. Multiple students who quietly disagreed with the message of the rainbow-colored Bison declined to comment to Lumination. But as people passed the Bison, multiple students pointed and captured pictures in secret from afar. LGBT students said this day was also an attempt to encourage students not to fear their sexual identities, as some people say they find their sexuality and spirituality in conflict. Lipscomb’s 2013-2014 handbook reads: “Sexual...
Public Relations Legend David Fox speaks at Lipscomb University’s  Media Masters

Public Relations Legend David Fox speaks at Lipscomb University’s Media Masters

David Fox spoke at the first Media Masters of the semester, hosted by the Communications Department at Lipscomb. Fox is one of the managing partners for one of the largest and oldest still-operating firms, MP&F, located in Nashville. MP&F is a strategic communications firm that focuses on public relations. Fox joined the MP&F team in 1990 and has been growing his career there ever since. With his career stretching into many different fields, Fox has worked with clients in areas such as automotive, health care, hospitality, government and urban affairs. Media relations and strategic planning are his areas of expertise. Fox has published three nonfiction books along with several magazine articles as a freelance writer for four years. “The world of journalism, and communications, has in my lifetime changed extremely and dramatically,” Fox said. Fox told the students how the newspaper used to be the one source to get your daily news back in the 70’s, compared to the more current times, where we can find out anything we want to know with just a click of a button. Gabriel Poe, a strategic communications major attended the event and said she was extremely pleased with what Fox had to say and felt privileged to have had the opportunity to hear him speak. “I loved his presentation,” Poe said. “He had humble beginnings and was very transparent about his journey. He was an incredibly eloquent speaker and acknowledged past challenges, business struggles and life lessons with grace and ownership.” Even though Fox currently works for a public relations firm, he said his past in journalism helped prepare him for his...
Bookstore raises questions with inflated prices

Bookstore raises questions with inflated prices

The University bookstore sometimes sells textbooks and online resources for $100 more than the publisher’s price. Students and faculty are looking elsewhere to purchase what they need for class. Professor Ted Parks found out from a student that the book and access code bundle for his Intermediate Spanish I class was $439 at Tree of Life, Lipscomb’s bookstore partner. Cengage, the book’s publisher, offers the bundle for $307.95. “After I emailed a Lipscomb administrator who works with issues related to textbooks, the bookstore discovered that the price was a mistake, quickly dropped it about $100 and proceeded to get in touch with students for a refund,” Parks said. “What profit margins are involved for publishers and university bookstores?” Parks hopes that faculty members and universities can develop more open-source materials to replace the profit motive with the desire for wider access to learning for everyone. Hannah Pipher, sophomore biology major, found out from another mistake by the Bookstore that she would have been charged more than double the publisher’s price for an online resource. “I just think it’s frustrating that through the bookstore I could buy my access code for about $200, Pipher said. “But because the bookstore ordered the wrong code for all of the General Chemistry 1 students, I just purchased it online through the company. I knew it would be cheaper, but I wasn’t expecting to only pay $75 for it.” Pipher was pleased that she chose the route she did. “I’m just really thankful that my professor told me I could buy it straight from the company,” she said. “I know several of my classmates...
Latest eatery to hit Lipscomb’s campus receives good reviews, prices scheduled to drop

Latest eatery to hit Lipscomb’s campus receives good reviews, prices scheduled to drop

Creekstone Burgers Co., along with its tasty burgers and homestyle milkshakes, has officially hit Lipscomb University’s campus, replacing the Asian cuisine establishment Far East Fusion. Not only did the new addition replace Far East Fusion, but it also forced other student center establishments Papa John’s and Blue Coast Burrito to move locations within the student center. Ashton Martin, a senior nursing student at Lipscomb, is just one of the students who is giving the new restaurant rave reviews. “Replacing Far East Fusion was such a good move,” Martin said. “The burgers here are incredible! My friend even ordered the veggie burger, and she told me it tastes just like real meat.” However, Martin did add that something Creekstone needs to improve upon in the coming weeks is faster service. “Although the choice was good to bring Creekstone Burgers to campus, they are still trying to figure out how to properly get the food out in time and be efficient while doing so,” Martin said. Creekstone has a large menu full of selections for customers. Students can choose from hamburgers, cheeseburgers, melts, hot dogs, french fries and classic milkshakes. All of these selections can be “doctored-up” with toppings and different extras to make it the ultimate burger, melt or hotdog. Anthony Bates is the new operations manager for Creekstone. Bates has been an employee at Lipscomb University for a few years. “Creekstone has had really incredible feedback, and we are still perfecting a few items to get them just right,” Bates said. Although Creekstone is brand new on campus, Bates noted that the burgers are competing well with all of...