Lipscomb students return from Israel, share their experiences

Lipscomb students return from Israel, share their experiences

Lipscomb students returned home from a 10-day trip to Israel on June 3 with a better understanding of ancient Israel and the modern geopolitical issues in the country. The trip partnered with Passages Israel to show the religious, social and political issues to students while exploring the roots of their faith. The team traveled across Israel, spending time in historical places like Jerusalem, Nazareth, Galilee and Caesarea. Team members saw the Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee. Some students also chose to get baptized in the Jordan River. Lipscomb graduate student Megan Deel is working on her Masters in Divinity and shared how visiting the Biblically-historic sights was the highlight of her trip. “The whole experience in Jerusalem was my favorite,” Deel said. “Especially because that is where Jesus died and rose; it was just such a special place to walk.” Senior Theology and Ministry major Joshua Stewart said the trip was more than just an educational experience. “This was also a spiritual journey,” Stewart said. “I read about the people, places and events of the Bible so much differently because I saw it with my own eyes. I have a much clearer image of Jesus standing in the synagogues, teaching and healing people He never met but knew and loved anyway. The Gospel has been given new life.” The students also visited the Gaza Strip and the Syrian border to better understand living in a war zone. Talking with people on the Gaza Strip, visiting bomb shelters and learning rocket alarm safety protocols are just a few of the ways the group learned about the conflict. Trip...
Lipscomb student gets behind-the-scenes look at CMA music Festival

Lipscomb student gets behind-the-scenes look at CMA music Festival

Alongside her grandma, student Veronika Jones worked with Music City Center throughout the entirety of the the CMA music festival and even found a potential career path she said she wants to pursue after graduation. The Junior International Affairs major worked the Fanfair inside Music City Center at the Radio Disney Country meet and greet. Jones was in charge of counting the fans that lined up and cutting off the line when the performers had to leave. “A lot of the times performers had somewhere to be right after they were done, like an interview or another show, so it was really fast paced,” Jones said.  “I met a lot of really nice people that were really understanding if I did have to cut the line off.” Jones worked closely with artists Cam, Maddie & Tae, LANCO and more. She noted that one of her favorite parts about working the CMA Fest was meeting all different kinds of people, not just the performing artists. “Everybody I worked with was awesome, and I also met a whole lot of interesting people from all over the world,” Jones said. “I met these girls who all became friends through Twitter because they were all Kelsea Ballerini fans.” Despite the many people she met, Jones said her favorite person she worked with was her “Gran.” Jones’ grandmother works for Music City Center and has worked the CMA Music Festival the past nine years. Music is a big part of Jones’ family, and she spent a lot of her childhood at the Grand Ole Opry where her Gran worked as a tour guide. “If...
Dr. Molefi Kete Asante and others speak during annual Christian Scholars’ Conference

Dr. Molefi Kete Asante and others speak during annual Christian Scholars’ Conference

Lipscomb hosted the 38th Annual Christian Scholars’ Conference this week, kicking off on Wednesday night with The Fred D. Gray Plenary in Human and Civil Rights and introducing keynote speaker Dr. Molefi Kete Asante. Lipscomb’s President Randy Lowry gave the opening remarks at the 6th annual conference. “You can’t be who you need to be if you remain who your are,” Lowry said. “As we engage in these conversations and the stimulations and the challenge that’s here, well, we never could’ve been who we will be had we not shared this experience.” The lecture honored civil rights attorney, preacher and activist, Fred David Gray who introduced the keynote speaker. Originally from Montgomery, Alabama, Gray attended Nashville Christian Institute and spent time working for professors at David Lipscomb College. Gray received his law degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Law before returning to Alabama where he worked closely with the Civil Rights Movement and Martin Luther King Jr. As a young attorney in Alabama, Gray also defended Claudette Colvin and Rosa Parks. “We have been able to assist in changing conditions and bringing about justice for all,” Gray said. “However, the struggle continues. We have not been able to change the hearts and the minds of our brothers and sisters.” Gray recounted how he later filed a suit in the United States District Court in Nashville against the then-President of David Lipscomb College, challenging the school’s segregation policies. In 2012, at the 32nd Annual Christian Scholars’ Conference, Gray received an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Lipscomb University. “Never did I ever think I would be invited back to...
Dr. Gallaher shares cancer diagnosis and message of belonging in ‘The Gathering’

Dr. Gallaher shares cancer diagnosis and message of belonging in ‘The Gathering’

Dr. Gallaher, professor of biology, shared his recent kidney cancer diagnosis in “The Gathering” on Tuesday. Professor Gallaher recently returned to teaching classes after the shocking medical diagnosis near the beginning of March. He spoke to students about his struggles and the belonging he found within the Lipscomb community. “One month ago today I discovered that I had Kidney Cancer,” Gallaher said. “We humans are fragile creatures. The day before I got my diagnosis was like any other day. In an instant it was all taken away.” The week after Dr. Gallaher received the diagnosis, he went in for surgery to have the mass removed. Due to complications, he ended up getting his entire kidney removed and lost a lot of blood in the process. What was supposed to be a couple days in the hospital ended up being a week in the intensive care unit. “I am six-foot-four. I weigh 265 pounds,” he said. “I have lived my life physically imposing, mentally tough. I conquer things. I do stuff that is significant. But in a moment I was weak as a kitten.” After the news of his diagnosis spread throughout social media, Dr. Gallaher said he was contacted by over 300 people in the Lipscomb community and throughout the country. Past students, current students, fellow faculty and other community members offered support while he was in the hospital. “The encouragement I received was overwhelming,” Gallaher said. “God shows up through the kindness of his people. That’s my story that I have been living.” Walking around on campus, Professor Gallaher said people are disengaged and numb in their lives....
Belmont’s aquisition of O’More College brings fashion competition next door

Belmont’s aquisition of O’More College brings fashion competition next door

Lipscomb’s neighbor school Belmont University announced in early February their acquisition of the O’More College of Design, currently located in Franklin, Tennessee. The expansion will commence in Fall 2018 and will add three new design majors to Belmont’s undergraduate program. The competition between Lipscomb and Belmont is deeply-rooted and this acquisition has the potential to spark major changes on Lipscomb’s campus. The almost 50-years old O’More College will be shutting the doors to its Franklin school, and students will have the choice to commute to Belmont’s campus. Editorial and News Content Director at Belmont, April Hefner, gave an official statement regarding the transition. “Belmont is proud to welcome new programs in interior design, fashion design and fashion merchandising when O’More joins our campus this fall,” Hefner said. “Our design communications major will also see an expansion with the influx of O’More graphic design students.” O’More was founded with interior design roots and has a fully accredited interior design program while Lipscomb has a minor interior design program that is not popular among students. However, the other design majors Belmont is collecting have yet to be accredited, leaving Lipscomb and its fully-accredited fashion program a major step ahead. Kathy Bates, the Chair of the Fashion and Design program at Lipscomb, taught a few adjunct classes at the O’More College of Fashion and Design several years ago and shared how she thinks Lipscomb will stand next to Belmont’s addition. “We have been the only one in Nashville that’s a fully accredited university that has a fully accredited fashion program,” Bates said. “I feel like we have pretty good ground to stand...