Students raise $3900 for Make-A-Way scholarship at Brokaw event

Students raise $3900 for Make-A-Way scholarship at Brokaw event

Lipscomb students collectively raised $3900 for a student-funded scholarship at the third-annual Imagine event, where author Donald Miller and journalist Tom Brokaw were the featured speakers, and rising country singer Abby Anderson performed a set. Tickets went for $5 minimum apiece. The money went directly to the Make-A-Way scholarship fund, which was started by junior Ralston Drake to help lower-income high school students afford Lipscomb. An anonymous donor paid for 125 student tickets. Miller told the students in attendance to ask themselves bold questions about their lives. “You’ll find that the people that really change the world are people that, whether they know it or not, they get up in the morning and ask, ‘What if?’” Interviewed on the Student Activity Center stage by senior journalism major Lindsey Nance, Brokaw reminisced on some of the highlights and tough moments of his career at NBC. He told students to “use intelligence, not emotion” when trying to make a difference in the world. “Rage is not a policy,” he said. “If you want to change the country, it’s tough, you’ve got to organize.” He advised the audience to be careful with information found online. “You should put as much effort into determining the truth of what you read on the Internet as you do into buying a new flatscreen television,” he said. fter Brokaw spoke to students, he addressed donors in Allen Arena at the invite-only main event of the evening. There, President Randy Lowry announced that the College of Business received a record $23 million gift from a group of donors who wish to remain anonymous. That money will go toward...
BREAKING: Record $23 million gift to College of Business announced at Imagine event

BREAKING: Record $23 million gift to College of Business announced at Imagine event

Lipscomb received a university record-breaking donation for the second consecutive year, president Randy Lowry announced at the Imagine donor event Tuesday evening. “This is a significant moment in the history of Lipscomb University,” Lowry said in a statement. “We are grateful to these donors for their commitment to this institution. This gift is an investment in our College of Business as a way to continue to elevate the image of the school as a leader in business education in Nashville and in the nation.” The $23 million gift from an anonymous group of donors is going to the College of Business to build a new facility and parking structure. Some of the money will go to the study-abroad campus in Florence, Italy. College of Business dean Ray Eldridge said the gift would help the College build on its recent successes, which include the accounting program being named tops in Tennessee for back-to-back years by College Factual. “It is exciting for our students and faculty to see how many people believe in our mission, and it also attracts attention from others who want to be part of what we’re doing,” Eldridge said. “They’re investing into the students of tomorrow,” business major Hillary Reader said. “They may be the students who make the new Amazons, the new Googles, the new Apples of the world. That’s all we can ask for – to keep getting better as students because those are the ones who transition to be the business leaders of tomorrow.” At the Imagine event last April, the University announced a then-school-record gift of $15 million from former NBA owner George...
Lipscomb security taking steps to protect in case of active shooter

Lipscomb security taking steps to protect in case of active shooter

Six weeks after a former student gunned down 17 of his classmates at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Lipscomb’s head of Campus Security Patrick Cameron told Lumination Network that students should follow a “see something, say something” policy to minimize threats of violence on campus. “Who sees better a student who is having—let’s say mental health issues, troubles—than their fellow students? They’re the ones interacting with them on a daily basis,” Cameron said. If an active shooter situation arises on campus, he said students should try to reach a safe location, and that if they’re in the path of the shooter, they should do everything possible to “interfere” with the shooter. “If you can’t get to a safe location, and you’re in the path, don’t just sit there.” Cameron said that the security office has “very definitive” plans in place for active shooter situations, though he declined to discuss them in detail. Students can report concerns about fellow students’ behavior, including social media posts or other actions, to the Security Office located in the basement of Elam. He said students should report “anything that jumps out and says, ‘This isn’t right. There’s something going on here that needs to be addressed.’” Those reports are referred to the University’s Behavioral Intervention Team, which is comprised of representatives from the Counseling Center, Veteran’s Services, Risk Management, Student Life, Security Office and Academic Success Center, plus outside mental health professionals. The team would then meet with the student who filed the report, then the student whose behavior was reported in order to assess the threat and determine if further...
Lipscomb falls to UNC in first round of NCAA Tournament after historic run

Lipscomb falls to UNC in first round of NCAA Tournament after historic run

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — In the school’s very first NCAA Tournament appearance, Lipscomb hung around with the University of North Carolina Tar Heels, but eventually fell 84-66 to the reigning NCAA champions. “Everybody knows it takes a magical night for somebody like us to beat somebody like them,” coach Casey Alexander said following the game. “And we didn’t do that, so we were playing uphill all night.” Lipscomb led the 2017 champs as late as the under-four timeout in the first half. Junior Garrison Mathews struggled with UNC’s Theo Pinson, who said he wanted to “make everything tough” on the ASUN’s leading scorer. “We knew we couldn’t support that much on him,” Pinson said. “Once he gets going, he gets going.” Pinson held Mathews to eight points on three-for-14 shooting. But even though the Bisons didn’t get Mathews’ best night, they looked the part of Cinderella for most of the first half. Kenny Cooper scored the first basket in Lipscomb tournament history on a three from the right wing. Mathews got on the board with an and-one layup in transition. Then a trio of Tar Heel turnovers and threes from Michael Buckland and Eli Pepper gave Lipscomb a 12-9 lead at the under-16 timeout. Marberry missed a pair of layups that would’ve extended the lead further. Mathews and Marberry shot two-for-seven each in the half. But North Carolina kept scuffling and the Bisons held the lead until Heels star forward Luke Maye’s three made it 25-23 Tar Heels. When Williams dropped in a three on the next possession, the majority-Carolina crowd erupted, and UNC seemed poised to make a run...
Lipscomb draws defending champs UNC in Charlotte for first NCAA Tournament game

Lipscomb draws defending champs UNC in Charlotte for first NCAA Tournament game

Lipscomb will face the defending champion North Carolina Tar Heels in Charlotte, N.C. Friday in the Bisons’ first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance. The two-seed Tar Heels defeated Gonzaga 71-65 in the 2017 final and are coming off a loss in the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship to the first-ranked University of Virginia. They have won six NCAA Championships in 49 appearances. “We’re not going to be better than North Carolina overall,” coach Casey Alexander said. “We’ve just got to be better than North Carolina in one 40-minute game.” That game will be played at the Spectrum Center in Charlotte, the home of the NBA’s Charlotte Hornets. The Bisons cut down the nets in Fort Myers last Sunday, defeating Florida Gulf Coast University 108-96 to clinch its first ASUN championship. Lipscomb was the last team slated into the NCAA Tournament bracket. Charlotte is about 400 miles from Nashville. Alexander said it was the “best-case scenario” in terms of traveling to the game. “I didn’t want to go too far away, where a lot of people couldn’t get there,” he said in a press conference following the bracket release show. “This is kind of the best of both worlds. Anybody that wants to go can go, but it’s a trip for our players for the full NCAA experience.” Bisons play-by-play announcer Jonathan Seamon emceed a watch party for the Selection Show in Allen Arena. Sophomore guards Kenny Cooper and Michael Buckland called going to the Big Dance a “dream come true.” Junior center Rob Marberry thanked the fans, who clapped for nearly an hour for cheerleaders, players and coaches until the Selection Show began. Alexander...