Theatre students team up with Nashville Rep. to encourage civil discussion of controversial issues

Theatre students team up with Nashville Rep. to encourage civil discussion of controversial issues

Lipscomb University theatre students are teaming up with the Nashville Repertory Theatre to perform  Inherit the Wind — a work discussing creationism and evolution being taught in schools — at the Tennessee Performing Arts Center. Inherit the Wind is a fictional recreation of the 1925 Scopes “Monkey” Trial, in which Dayton, Tennessee, schoolteacher, John Scopes, is tried in court for teaching evolution, instead of creationism, in a classroom. Emily Meinerding, a senior acting major, plays Rachel Brown, the daughter of the minister and girlfriend to Bertram Cates, the fictional version of John Scopes. Meinerding says this play is particularly relevant to our society currently. “I think that there is a lot of polarizing situations in our culture as it is,” Meinerding said. “This play is one that encourages people to be open-minded, not to accept all, but to listen to all, to evaluate all, to read into things before you make decisions.” This production will run through Apr. 21 at the Andrew Johnson Theater. Tickets are available through the Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s website, starting at $25. Chapel Credit is available to students for attending April 6 with a talkback led by Dr. Randy Spivey. “Come in with an open mind whether you’re an evolutionist, or a creationist or somewhere in the middle,” Meinerding said. “Just be open to the idea that maybe things aren’t as cut and dried as you believe; things are more gray than we might realize.” Photo courtesy of Lipscomb...
Administration addresses why Lipscomb holds classes on Good Friday

Administration addresses why Lipscomb holds classes on Good Friday

Lipscomb University, a Church of Christ school, doesn’t dismiss classes campus-wide for Good Friday, but maintains it has a good reason for doing so. Since the university keeps its students in classes on Good Friday, many out-of-state or international students stay on campus over Easter, without sufficient time to travel home to celebrate with their families. Lipscomb University President Randy Lowry was out of town over Good Friday, so he was unable to comment this year. Last year, Lowry commented he would give the time off if he thought students would actually celebrate the holiday. “If we dismissed for Friday, what would students go do?” Lowry said last year. “If students said, ‘I’m going to go celebrate Easter, and spend the day in meditation and prayer, or at a Good Friday service,’ or whatever, I’d let you out of school in a moment. I don’t believe they’d do that. I believe they’d take a three-day weekend, they’d go home, and there’d be something lost here because our community was not together to celebrate.” The campus celebrates Easter throughout the week with many Resurrection Week activities on campus, with additional chapel opportunities, speakers and worship events. “I think it makes more sense to say, as a community, we’re here on Good Friday,” Lowry said. “We’ll have a service, which we haven’t always done on Good Friday, and invite the community to come be a part of that.” This year, to explain why class is held on Good Friday, the administration, through Kim Chaudoin, the Assistant Vice President with University Communication and Marketing, issued the following statement to Lumination: “In the...
$25,000 worth of film equipment reported missing from film department

$25,000 worth of film equipment reported missing from film department

Lipscomb University’s Department of Cinematic Arts is undergoing drastic departmental changes after over $25,000 worth of lenses, cameras and accessories disappeared from the department at the end of January. Chair of Cinematic Arts Melissa Forte reached out to cinematic arts students on Jan. 30 in an email informing them of the incident, and asking for the return of the equipment so the department wouldn’t need to involve the police. “We are not taking this lightly,” Forte said in the email. “The value of this equipment is very high and the security of the remaining equipment very important.” Since the Cinematic Arts department has existed for only three years, a theft of this magnitude is a crushing blow to their resources. However, this is not the first theft within the department. Both a Mac computer and money from an office were stolen previously, so the department is now altering their checkout policy in order to safeguard against further theft. Students will no longer be allowed to use departmental Macs to edit at night, as they will be kept under lock and key. Further changes have yet to be announced. Lipscomb security was contacted for all key logs and surrounding video footage of the time, but nothing conclusive has yet arisen. The basement of Sewell has yet to be fitted with cameras as the area is awaiting renovation by the theatre department, for the cameras would not only take months to install and connect, but they would cost around $8,000 to install. Security is hesitant because they would only to have to redo the installation with the theatre renovation. Lumination reached...
New construction, added guest spaces further restrict student parking

New construction, added guest spaces further restrict student parking

Students have lost more parking due to construction on a new lot alongside Bison Inn and to 11 spaces in the Bison Inn lot now designated to guest and head resident spaces. There has not been clear communication to Bison Inn residents as to when they are, or are not, allowed to use these spots when guests aren’t filling the rooms in the inn. “Unless there’s a name in the little slot, you can park here during the day; we just say no overnight parking,” said Bison Inn senior manager Anamarie Knapp. “It may be that somebody’s coming in at seven a.m., and we can’t have a car sitting there for two days.” Lipscomb University boasts 2,657 spaces for students to park in, but after removing reserved spaces (such as faculty/staff, guest, handicap, head resident spots, compact vehicles, academy students, and VP), the average student can only park in 2,225 of the spots available in lots owned by the university. In 2016, the university had 4,680 students enrolled, making the student-to-average-parking-spot ratio 2.1:1. With 2.1 students to each parking space, many students have resorted to parking outside of the lines. Tickets are still given for cars left outside of lines, even if the vehicle is not in an explicit no-parking zone. “The intent of a ticket is not to collect money, the intent is to correct an action,” head of security Patrick Cameron said. “If I can get you to stop doing what you’re doing by a warning ticket, I’m all for it. The reason for tickets is to prevent people from continuing an action that puts the safety...
All-female cast delivers powerful retelling of ‘Richard II’

All-female cast delivers powerful retelling of ‘Richard II’

Whether you’re Shakespeare-obsessed or have no experience with iambic pentameter whatsoever, Sean Martin’s Richard II is the must-see show of this season. “As far as we know this will be the first production of Richard II ever to be staged in Nashville,” director Sean Martin said. “I also just think opportunities to see things like this are often rare outside of places like New York or London, and it would be an unfortunate thing to miss it.” Richard II is the story of a capricious king who makes arbitrary decisions until his own people welcome an invasion to change leadership. The production examines divine right, the responsibility of the commoners and the psychological weight of a crown. The iconic work is retold with an entirely female cast, mixed with Lipscomb theatre students and Nashville Shakespeare Festival (NSF) actors. Caroline Amos, a regular actress with the NSF, shines in the role of Richard II, her mastery of Shakespeare obvious from her crisp diction and breathtaking storytelling. Amos portrays Richard II honestly and powerfully, making him startlingly relatable. The audience can sympathize with Richard’s mistakes through Amos’ retelling, instead of writing him off as incompetent or weak. The dispute between Carrie Brewer’s role of Bolingbrook and Evelyn O’Neal Brush’s portrayal of Mowbray kickstarts the production, creating a conflict powerful enough to carry the whole show in its wake. Denice Hicks is the perfect choice for the Duke of York. Her wise warmth fills out the intensely loyal role, endearing her to the audience. Richard II also features Lipscomb professor and Chair of Theater Beki Baker as Northumberland, a role she portrays...