‘Miss America’ pageant question sparks debate among Lipscomb students

‘Miss America’ pageant question sparks debate among Lipscomb students

The Miss America pageant’s on-stage question portion often sparks conversations regarding both country and world. This year’s pageant was held this past Sunday, and its winner, Miss North Dakota Cara Mund, was asked her opinion on the Paris Agreement by television personality Maria Menounos. “195 countries signed the Paris Agreement in which each country sets non-binding goals to reduce man-made climate change,” Menounos noted. “The U.S. is withdrawing from the agreement citing negligible environmental effects and negative economic impact. Good decision? Bad decision? Which is it and why?” Mund replied that she thought it was an overall bad decision, offering her thoughts on what she believed should have occured with the discussion. “Once we reject that, we take ourselves out of the negotiation table, and that’s something we need to keep in mind,” Mund said. “There is evidence that climate change exists. Whether we believe it or not, we need to be at that table. I think it is just a bad decision on behalf of the U.S.” Mund’s answer was well received by the audience and judges, but Lipscomb students had differing opinions on the matter. “I support what Trump did,” said Andrew Trent, a junior marketing major. “The deal was biased against America and was interfering with some of our jobs.” Trent explained that he does believe America should be taking steps to care for the environment, but he thinks that these steps should not be coordinated with Europe but instead should be independent efforts. However, other students agreed with the current Miss America’s stance. Mason Borneman, an aspiring lawyer and lifelong supporter of the Miss America...
Hurricane Harvey hits home

Hurricane Harvey hits home

To some Lipscomb students, the affects of Hurricane Harvey are much more personal than rainfall in Nashville. Hurricane Harvey and its effect on Texas have garnered the attention and sympathy of people worldwide. “I come from a really big family, and most of them live in Houston,” said Allan Hooker, a Houston native. “I would say our biggest struggle would be making sure the people that we know, love and care about are safe. “The people of Houston are always so kind and great,” Hooker said, adding, “They don’t deserve this, but maybe God is allowing this to happen to further His kingdom. The best advice I can give to anyone who is affected by this is to trust in the Lord.” Texas is a state known for being rooted in family and community, but Hurricane Harvey has left Texas residents aching to be reunited with their families during this devastating time. Hooker has kept in contact with his family throughout the week with phone calls and FaceTime. Maritza Munoz, a junior and another Houston native, said it is hard to focus in class while people back home are struggling. “I’m looking at the stuff online, so then for me to get off my phone and go to class here in Nashville is just weird because I feel like part of me is in a different state,” Munoz said. Munoz’s father is currently staying in a hotel after his apartment was flooded with over two feet of water. She explained that despite the loss of some of his material possessions, he is still in good spirits. Junior Arden Whitehurst...

Homeless to Lipscomb: senior Lebron Hill shares his story

For over a decade, the true story of Liz Murray in Homeless to Harvard has inspired many people throughout the world. Many students on campus are unaware that a Lipscomb student has a similar story. Lebron Hill, a senior from Tullahoma, now calls Sewell Hall home, but just five years ago his setting was very different. Hill became a resident of the Shepherd’s House, a homeless shelter in his small Tennessee hometown, when he was just eighteen. Up until then, his life was plagued by psychological abuse from his mother and a home life that did not emphasize the importance of a good education. Hill, with the assistance of his mother, dropped out of high school during his senior year. Needing an escape, he went to the Shepherd’s House. On the way to the shelter, Hill and his brother got into an argument. Hill’s brother stopped the car and threw all of Hill’s belongings into a ditch. Hill later arrived to the shelter in tears and began to contemplate what direction his life would go. “I remember thinking ‘what’s next?’,” Hill said. “The first month in the shelter was a lot of praying, a lot of questioning and a lot of figuring out who I was as a person.” Hill decided to get his GED and began biking back and forth to school and his job at Kroger. During this time, he began a connection with his childhood pastor Randy Davis. Davis took an interest in Hill and encouraged him to attend Motlow State Community College; Davis would eventually drive him to and from school each day and to...
Lipscomb alumnus founds ‘Millennial View’ company

Lipscomb alumnus founds ‘Millennial View’ company

Lipscomb alumnus Trevor Gormley founded the “Millennial View” after a self-realization that companies have trouble managing and retaining millennial employees. Since the foundation of the Millennial View, the company has appeared in Ink Magazine, Huffington Post, Buzzfeed, Los Angeles Times and Sports Illustrated, and Gormley himself appeared on CNBC four times. “We help businesses manage, recruit, retain and market to the millennial demographic,” said Lipscomb student Michael Levashov, the Millennial View’s Director of Research. Levashov, a Financial Markets and Accounting double major at Lipscomb, currently conducts research and builds courses for the company. He first met Gormley through Alpha Kappa Psi, an international professional business fraternity on campus. Through the connection of Alpha Kappa Psi, Gormley also appointed Lipscomb student Hannah Kraebel as the Head of Strategic Execution. The Millennial View exists not only as a consulting firm, but its founders also seek to empower millennial students and employees to recognize their value. They said they want students to know they don’t have to have any kind of degree or certification to impact the world; they hope the impact of the Millennial View will encourage an independent mindset that will create a ripple effect for generations to come. “Our ability to learn and solve problems is a lot higher than any other generation,” Levashov said. “We were born and raised with the ability to access information. We can find ways to solve problems a lot faster than other...
Andrew Garfield’s performance inspires audiences in ‘Hacksaw Ridge’

Andrew Garfield’s performance inspires audiences in ‘Hacksaw Ridge’

Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge is a must-see film. Hacksaw Ridge, the incredible, true story of US Army medic Desmond Doss, is inspiring and thrills audiences. The World War II biographical stars Andrew Garfield. It received a 10-minute standing ovation at the 73rd annual Venice Film Festival where it premiered. Hacksaw Ridge portrays Doss’ commitment to his Seventh-day Adventist faith as a US Army medic who does not believe in touching a gun, killing another person or working on Saturday, the Sabbath. Doss is belittled, mocked and abused for his beliefs by fellow army men. He is even faced with a possible heavy prison sentence for disobeying orders after refusing to participate in rifle training for these reasons. Many of his commanders and peers considered Doss a coward because of his beliefs. Ironically, Doss ends up being the man who singlehandedly saves 75 of his comrades without a weapon while he is under constant enemy fire. Hacksaw Ridge is a phenomenal film. Garfield’s constant, genuine and kind performance is award-winning. The message of the movie is to be faithful to your beliefs, no matter the cost and live courageously. Though there was a lot of gore and conflict, you will leave the theater feeling happy and inspired. It is a must-see film! Photo courtesy of...