‘Les Miserables’ opens at TPAC; delivers powerful performance

‘Les Miserables’ opens at TPAC; delivers powerful performance

Les Miserables brought in a large crowd to the Tennessee Performing Arts Center on Tuesday, for its opening night. The award-winning show made its way to Nashville as a part of the national tour. The musical follows the fictional Jean Valjean on his journey from a prisoner to a successful businessman. The show tracks his sorrows, his moral triumphs and his place in the French Revolution. Valjean’s life is a portrayal of redemption and growth through God and the kindness of God’s people. He exhibits the traits of a forgiven man who is secure in his relationship with God. Les Miserables is an informative production that displays the terrible climate of France during its revolution. It highlights the suffering and injustice of the time and applauds the citizens’ thirst for equality and justice throughout the country. The raw emotion of each scene is touching and has the audience contemplating what is most important in life. There are Christian themes throughout as well as themes of integrity and true love. The messages portrayed throughout the entire show are timeless and can touch any heart no matter the circumstance. The show was creative and elaborate for a traveling production.  The actors’ voices were amazing but the acting itself was underwhelming. Many of the songs were vocally astounding but were unequally accompanied by tired acting. Though the acting was dull, the well-designed set was the opposite. The elaborate, French set was dynamic and eye-catching. The war scenes were beautifully crafted and the smooth transitions between scenes kept the audience’s attention. The production was well received by the audience.  Most scenes were met with cheering and laughing. The cast was given a standing ovation at the end of the night. It was clear that the show was a...
Title IX office hosts ‘Taboo Talks with Title IX’

Title IX office hosts ‘Taboo Talks with Title IX’

On Nov. 1 last week, the Title IX office held an event in Ward Hall titled “Taboo Talks with Title IX.” The event focused on the Title IX office, sexual misconduct and the Amnesty Clause. Senior Christian Monyei hosted the evening and introduced spoken word performances, facts, discussions, audience polls and film clips. Monyei opened the night with a quote from Martin Luther King Jr. that states, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” Kathy Hargis, Title IX Coordinator, was also in attendance. She spoke to the small crowd and answered questions that participants had about sexual misconduct on campus.  Hargis and Monyei both said that they thought this event would be an excellent way to inform students about this prevalent worldwide issue. “As a faith based institution, it is important that we address the harder, more uncomfortable topics because that is what we are called to do as Christians,” Monyei said. One issue that was addressed was Lipscomb’s faculty-wide unequal representation. When asked if they felt males and females had equal representation on campus, 74% of the students in attendance said they felt women were underrepresented. Many other polls were conducted to understand the climate of safety and inclusivity on campus. ‘Taboo Talks’ served as a safe place for students to address their concerns and to tell their own personal stories of abuse while being surrounded by a supportive group of people. Hargis then urged all in attendance to go to the Title IX office to voice any requests for help or resources they may need regarding discrimination or sexual misconduct. Many students...
Lipscomb alumni victims of Tennessee church shooting

Lipscomb alumni victims of Tennessee church shooting

On September 24, Emanuel Samson opened fire on churchgoers at Burnette Chapel in Antioch. One woman was fatally shot and eight other individuals were injured, including the gunman. Two of the injured victims are Lipscomb alumni. David “Joey” Span, the pastor of Burnette Chapel and a Bible teacher at Nashville Christian School, graduated with a degree in Kinesiology in 1974. William “Don” Jenkins is a 1957 Business Administration graduate and the grandfather of current Lipscomb student Marlena Jenkins. Katherine Dickerson, another victim, is the mother of Josh Dickerson, a 2004 College of Business graduate. Burnette Chapel resumed services just one week following the attack. People from around the country attended the service to show their support for the victims and the church community. Spann, who was released from the hospital Wednesday, was in attendance and spoke briefly. His wife Peggy remains hospitalized at Vanderbilt Medical Center with other victims The church body is receiving grief counseling from Metro Police Department Chaplains through the church’s insurance. Special counseling is being provided for those who were shot or are going through Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Lipscomb has been on site at both the church and hospital since the attack occurred and has assisted Burnette Chapel’s leadership in making plans and creating processes for the future. Lipscomb Building and Grounds also clean up the building before the first worship service and the university’s counseling center has been of assistance to the church members as well. Photo courtesy of The...
‘Miss America’ pageant question sparks debate among Lipscomb students

‘Miss America’ pageant question sparks debate among Lipscomb students

The Miss America pageant’s on-stage question portion often sparks conversations regarding both country and world. This year’s pageant was held this past Sunday, and its winner, Miss North Dakota Cara Mund, was asked her opinion on the Paris Agreement by television personality Maria Menounos. “195 countries signed the Paris Agreement in which each country sets non-binding goals to reduce man-made climate change,” Menounos noted. “The U.S. is withdrawing from the agreement citing negligible environmental effects and negative economic impact. Good decision? Bad decision? Which is it and why?” Mund replied that she thought it was an overall bad decision, offering her thoughts on what she believed should have occured with the discussion. “Once we reject that, we take ourselves out of the negotiation table, and that’s something we need to keep in mind,” Mund said. “There is evidence that climate change exists. Whether we believe it or not, we need to be at that table. I think it is just a bad decision on behalf of the U.S.” Mund’s answer was well received by the audience and judges, but Lipscomb students had differing opinions on the matter. “I support what Trump did,” said Andrew Trent, a junior marketing major. “The deal was biased against America and was interfering with some of our jobs.” Trent explained that he does believe America should be taking steps to care for the environment, but he thinks that these steps should not be coordinated with Europe but instead should be independent efforts. However, other students agreed with the current Miss America’s stance. Mason Borneman, an aspiring lawyer and lifelong supporter of the Miss America...
Hurricane Harvey hits home

Hurricane Harvey hits home

To some Lipscomb students, the affects of Hurricane Harvey are much more personal than rainfall in Nashville. Hurricane Harvey and its effect on Texas have garnered the attention and sympathy of people worldwide. “I come from a really big family, and most of them live in Houston,” said Allan Hooker, a Houston native. “I would say our biggest struggle would be making sure the people that we know, love and care about are safe. “The people of Houston are always so kind and great,” Hooker said, adding, “They don’t deserve this, but maybe God is allowing this to happen to further His kingdom. The best advice I can give to anyone who is affected by this is to trust in the Lord.” Texas is a state known for being rooted in family and community, but Hurricane Harvey has left Texas residents aching to be reunited with their families during this devastating time. Hooker has kept in contact with his family throughout the week with phone calls and FaceTime. Maritza Munoz, a junior and another Houston native, said it is hard to focus in class while people back home are struggling. “I’m looking at the stuff online, so then for me to get off my phone and go to class here in Nashville is just weird because I feel like part of me is in a different state,” Munoz said. Munoz’s father is currently staying in a hotel after his apartment was flooded with over two feet of water. She explained that despite the loss of some of his material possessions, he is still in good spirits. Junior Arden Whitehurst...