Lipscomb partners with Salvation Army to give to the needy this Christmas

Lipscomb partners with Salvation Army to give to the needy this Christmas

This Christmas season, Lipscomb’s Intercultural Honor Society is helping The Salvation Army give gifts to people through the Angel Tree program.  “I just love Christmas time so I thought maybe we could bring Angel Tree with Lipscomb,” said Amy Carpio, the co-president of the Intercultural Honor Society.  The Angel Tree program is “a Christmas Assistance program for families who needing help providing gifts and basic needs to their children at Christmas,” according to the Salvation Army website. The IHS provides the lists of wants and needs so that people may pick out who they want to “adopt” by buying gifts and necessities this Christmas.  So far, around 40 people are waiting to be “adopted.” The IHS office hopes that all of the “angels” get adopted, according to Sali Dagandan, the secretary of IHS. Carpio encouraged students that if they want to adopt an “angel,” but the costs of presents might be too high, they can also partner up with others. “I know as a college student is hard to buy presents, even to your family, but you can do it with your friends. You can pitch in for one angel or you can bring one to your family and do it as a holiday project together,” said Carpio. Carpio said they chose to work with The Salvation Army because of its scope.  “[The Salvation Army] doesn’t only incorporate giving gifts to people in need that are children, but also senior citizens and families,” she said. Stop by the student center this week between 10:55 AM and 2 PM to adopt an angel. After this week, the program will continue...
Delta Sigma raises over $500 through ‘Don’t get high, throw a pie’

Delta Sigma raises over $500 through ‘Don’t get high, throw a pie’

After chapel on Tuesday afternoon, students gathered outside in the square to throw pies at some of their professors and fellow students. Social club Delta Sigma hosted the event, aptly titled — “Don’t get high, throw a pie” — and brought students and faculty to support Mercy Multiplied. Mercy Multiplied is a non-profit, Christian organization that houses girls who suffer from life-harming issues that include self-harm, drug or alcohol addictions, eating disorders, etc. Delta Sigma member Marina Forwith shared the meaning behind the event and its support for the cause. “We wanted to kind of switch it up, but we still wanted to raise awareness about drug and alcohol abuse,” Forwith said. “I wanted it to be something personal to our club, and it’s been really amazing just seeing already how much impact it is going to have.” Delta Sigma member Tori Chew is a recent graduate of Mercy, and she expressed how important of an organization is to her personally. “Without Mercy, I probably wouldn’t be here, and I just think it’s important to raise awareness for Mercy and how much it is impacting my life and a thousand of other girls around the country,” Chew said. Lipscomb faculty member Aaron Burtch was one of the people who got “pie’d.” “It’s just really important to be getting that message out and about, making important decisions, and surround yourself with really good people,” Burtch said. “I think a lot of it is what Lipscomb is all about, but it’s just kind of basic Christian principles that we can be a part of.” Sam Smith, Lipscomb’s Dean of Student Life, also...
LUV sweeps Belmont at home

LUV sweeps Belmont at home

Tonight’s Battle of the Boulevard was filled with spikes by the Lipscomb volleyball team as the Bisons swept Belmont in three sets at Allen Arena. The three sets ended 25-11, 25-17 and 25-10. “They came out and played hard,” Sean Johnson, strength and conditioning coach, said. “The girls were focused, they came out and played well. It’s good just to see them develop as players; their hard work pays off.” Outside hitter Carlyle Nusbaum and middle blocker Ca’Layci Coffey, both seniors, each made three kills in a row. “Our team has amazing chemistry. We make sure that we play for each other and for the coaches and do our job,” Nusbaum said. “We have a lot of experience and a lot of chemistry,” Nusbaum said. “We’ve been through all for the last three and a half years.” The Bisons will travel to Champaign, Ill. this weekend for the three-game Illini Classic, hosted by the University of Illinois. Friday features a doubleheader against Northern Illinois and Creighton, then Lipscomb will take on the hosts...
New commuter lounge receives mixed reviews

New commuter lounge receives mixed reviews

It’s been a week since fall classes started and students are already experiencing changes on Lipscomb’s campus. That includes a new commuter lounge in the Bennett Campus Center. Lipscomb has offered commuters a space for them to work on projects and relax in between classes, but that space has been moved from the Elam Hall basement and into the heart of campus. SGA president Sierra Sparks said the new location will help commuter students connect with the rest of the student body. “Change is something students can adjust to,” Sparks said. “Commuters (need) to feel like they’re a part of things and connect with other students who hang out at the Student Center.” According to Director of Student Involvement Louis Nelms, one of the main reasons the lounge was moved was because the previous location was separate from the rest of the campus. “Moving it to the (Student Center) gave the commuters an opportunity to not feel isolated,” he said. Nelms added that it will give students more “exposure to (residential) students and what’s happening on campus and make them feel like a priority.” Students have already offered their feedback on the new location. Some students have given their appreciation for the effort and the attention given to commuters, while the change has been a hard adjustment for others. The move from Elam, a quiet place with couches and lockers, to a more crowded area has been cause for concern for some students. “It’s more like a study room,” Biology major Tiya Souki said. Other students agreed that the space doesn’t feel like a lounge and believe it needs...
Eaton shares final-week message of encouragement at ‘The Gathering’

Eaton shares final-week message of encouragement at ‘The Gathering’

With finals rapidly approaching and senior students soon graduating in May, the last chapel service of the year was held in Collins auditorium on Tuesday morning. Cyrus Eaton shared a message with students at The Gathering about learning how to receive God’s love. Eaton said love within the community is the best way to learn how to receive and give love. Being part of a house with roommates, Eaton shared his experience on how they took care of each other. He consulted the book of John that described how Peter questioned Jesus when he washed his feet. Like Peter, Eaton said man tends to reject the chance others have to be kind to one another. Not because man is mean, but because he might not ask for anything in return if he does something for others. God wants man to know how to receive love from others in order to grow. “Our capacity to love is not determined by our position in regards to others,” Eaton said. “Our ability to love others will always be tied to our willingness to receive His love. We cannot give what we have not learned to receive.” Eaton noted how oftentimes man can feel comfortable helping others, but it’s hard to let others help you. If man receives generosity, he will eventually learn how to give them to others. Those who look at you should almost desire and envy the life of sacrificial living that you have,” Eaton said. He noted that others like you encourage the community to live how Jesus taught. He provided an example through a Mother Teresa saying: “Little...