Bison defaced in the midst of anti-Asian hate crimes

Bison defaced in the midst of anti-Asian hate crimes

Last Wednesday, March 24, Lipscomb’s ACON (Asian Community) club painted the bison to say, “Protect Asian Lives,” following the massacre of 8 women, 6 of whom were of Asian descent, in Atlanta spas on the 16 of March. Sophomore Corporate Management student Cindy Hong is President of ACON and explained why they spray-painted those words: “With the recent massacre that happened in Atlanta, and nationwide there’s been a lot of anti-Asian hate crimes, we just wanted to create awareness and show solidarity and respect to those who lost their lives and give a message to Lipscomb’s student body that there should be zero tolerance to Asian hate. It was also to share a message to other Asian-Americans that we hear them and see them. We shared a picture of the painted bison on our ACON Instagram so that people would know we are a resource and would feel free to DM/come to us.” Wednesday night, though, the bison was painted over to say, “Cookout: This is all that matters.” Hong described how she felt when she found out the bison had been vandalized. “I was kind of shocked but not shocked at the same time because it was something I kind of saw coming but it is still very shocking in a way where I can’t believe someone would do that. Of course I was mad, angered, very sad, I felt like I was being struck.” Many students on campus felt the same way. This is not the first time the bison has been defaced. In 2020, the bison was vandalized twice, first over an LGBTQ+ painting, then over...
How Lipscomb is engaging in creation through composting

How Lipscomb is engaging in creation through composting

Bison Compost is a new initiative that began last fall on Lipscomb’s campus that is seeking to reduce food waste in the cafeteria. So far, 5,072.5 pounds of waste have been diverted from the landfill. That’s equivalent to the weight of a Range Rover. The student leader behind Bison Compost is Isadora Koch, a Junior Environmental Sustainability Science major with an emphasis in Communication and Policy. Koch started Bison Compost as part of a fellowship called Youth Evangelicals for Climate Action that requires that the members complete a sustainability-related project. Koch had learned a lot about composting, and when she saw how much waste there was in the Lipscomb cafeteria, she wanted to help start composting on campus. Koch began by talking with her advisor, Dr. Stutzman, who directed her to Darry Hunstman. Huntsman serves as Executive Chef in the cafeteria and has been a sustainability activist himself. In addition to being a farmer and beekeeper, he also worked at William-Mary College, where they already were composting. Koch shared her vision with him, and he agreed to collaborate with her in getting the composting initiative instated at Lipscomb. The first step was figuring out who to partner with, as on-site composting would be difficult and space-limited. Koch found Compost Nashville, which specializes in organics management. They figured out pricing, and a representative came on campus for assessment. With the help of volunteers, a waste audit was conducted in the cafeteria. Because of the new COVID-19 protocols and the required training, it was decided to start capturing food waste from the food preparation side. “I was actually really surprised to...
Trial begins in Senate over Trump’s impeachment

Trial begins in Senate over Trump’s impeachment

The impeachment trial for former president Donald J. Trump began Tuesday morning. Trump became the first-ever president to be impeached twice when the House of Representatives voted on Jan. 13 to charge him for “incitement of insurrection”. The vote passed 232-197. Now, the trial has moved to the Senate, where senators will vote on whether to convict Trump. A two-thirds vote would be needed to convict, meaning that 17 Republicans would have to vote across party lines. Traditionally, the impeached official would be removed from office if convicted. Since Trump is the first president to be tried after leaving office, many speculate that he could be barred from holding future public offices if convicted. The main concern raised in the trial was regarding the constitutionality of impeaching a public official who is no longer in office. Representative Jamie Raskin, Lead Impeachment Manager, opened the trial by defending the constitutionality. He showed a 13-minute-long video recounting the insurrection at the capitol. It showed both Trump’s speech and the mob as the day unfolded, a reminder of the fear on Jan 6. “If that’s not an impeachable offense, then I don’t know what is,” Raskin stated. Regarding the constitutionality of the trial, he claimed the ability to impeach a president in her or his last few weeks is the most important “because that’s when elections get attacked.” Trump’s lawyers, on the other hand, maintained that impeachment after leaving office is unconstitutional. They claimed that Democrats were set in “seeking to eliminate Donald Trump from the American political scene.” Shortly after 5 p.m. EST Tuesday, the Senate voted 56-44 that the impeachment...
Lipscomb Community reacts to Insurrection at U.S. Capitol

Lipscomb Community reacts to Insurrection at U.S. Capitol

Like the majority of Americans, Lipscomb junior Rachel Pavelich is still shaken by the violent and deadly assault on the Capitol that was aimed at upsetting the confirmation of the electoral college presidential landslide victory of Joe Biden. “It was really disappointing to see our country like that,” said Pavelich, a fashion design major. At least five people, including a Capitol police officer, died as the result of the armed insurrection organized and coordinated by right-wing extremist groups, according to law enforcement and U.S. intelligence. The only thing Pavelich did notice that encouraged her during the insurrection that was incited by President Donald Trump, was the fact that party lines, in many cases, disappeared as the insurrectionists, some armed, pounded on the doors of the House chamber. “It struck me because it’s not about sides. It’s about uniting as Americans and helping each other. I feel like that’s what America is supposed to be.” The insurrection led House Democrats to Monday introduce articles of impeachment against the president. There also is a move afoot to get Vice President Mike Pence to act on the 25th Amendment, which could remove Trump from office immediately. That move was stalled early Monday, but it still could happen. Pence, who stood by his boss throughout the last several years, was a target of the rioters, who had been told by Trump that the vice president let him down by not blocking the confirmation of the electoral college votes that gave Joe Biden the presidency by a landslide. When the rioters stormed the Capitol Wednesday, after being urged by Trump to take action there, a...
The significance of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris breaking barriers

The significance of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris breaking barriers

As millions across the country celebrated the results from the presidential election, much of the focus was on Vice President-elect Kamala Harris. Harris will be the first female, first Black and first South Asian vice president of the United States. Harris, the daughter of immigrants, is no stranger to breaking barriers. Her mother, who came to the U.S. from India at the age of 19, used to tell her, “You may be the first to do many things, but make sure you’re not the last.” Harris promised in her victory speech on Saturday to follow those wise words. Speaking directly to the children of our country, she said, “Dream with ambition, lead with conviction and see yourself in a way that others might not see you, simply because they’ve never seen it before. And we will applaud you every step of the way.” For women, especially women of color in the U.S., her election is personal. Shaniya Pleasant, a senior biology major, explained why representation matters to her. “I think that having a Black vice president elect is so important because I finally get to see someone who looks like me, who loves me, and wants the best for us in office for once,” Pleasant said. “It’s so vital because representation matters on all levels. And today a Black and South Asian woman is our country’s first female vice president elect, and that simply makes my heart swell.” Sarah Feldman, a junior nursing major, had similar thoughts. “In society today, women are viewed as less than, and from the time children are born they are taught to fit into...