Women’s Empowerment Week features session with Dr. Kate Watkins

Women’s Empowerment Week features session with Dr. Kate Watkins

Lipscomb’s student population is nearly 60% female. A group of female students organized the second annual Women’s Empowerment Week. On Tuesday, Dr. Kate Watkins, the executive director of the Lipscomb LIFE Program, spoke to a group of students and faculty about her personal story as a woman in academia, as well as topics such as women’s role in the church and in the workplace. The night began with dinner and a game of “name that powerful woman.” The audience identified historically significant women through a series of clues from host, Leslie Garcia. The group laughed and played together before the mic was turned over to the speaker of the night. Through personal anecdotes and Biblical references, Dr. Watkins shared her wisdom with the audience about the source of true power. “It is not up to someone else to name me as empowered or to name me as powerful,” Watkins said. “My job does not empower me, my education does not empower me, my recognition does not empower me. I am empowered, hidden in Christ.” The week has featured multiple sessions, including a special Service Day volunteer location on Wednesday, and a MASK Chapel panel on “Beauty Standards Across Diverse Cultures” on Thursday. Garcia, a senior English major and president of the Diverse Student Coalition, said she hopes that students, men and women alike, will be able to learn from this week. “The goal throughout the week is empowering and equipping all students to recognize that there are powerful women on this campus, and in this city and in this...
Outside professors call for grace for Fast Track MBA students caught cheating

Outside professors call for grace for Fast Track MBA students caught cheating

Following a situation in which a significant contingent of students in Lipscomb’s Fast Track MBA program cheated on an online, take-home final exam by working together, professors outside of the College of Business called for grace to be administered to the offenders. It is not yet clear what disciplinary action will be enforced against the two-thirds of students in the class who were found to have collaborated on the test. The students are meeting individually with Dr. Joe Ivey, the professor of the class. Dr. Paul Prill, dean of the Honors College, suggested that the instructions given on the test are key to determining the appropriate discipline. “I think that a lot will have to do with how the assignment was set up and whether or not the students understood what they were doing was actually cheating, as opposed to their understanding of collaboration,” Dr. Paul Prill said. “The understanding of cheating versus collaboration plays a role in how the students should be punished.” Dr. Walter Surdacki, an associate professor of Bible and the chair of the Academic Integrity Board, said he views the integrity policy as “tremendously redemptive.” “So there are a number of instances in which a student is cited for academic dishonesty,” Surdacki said. “There are the obvious ones like cheating and plagiarism, but there also some of the less obvious ones like collaborating with people when you’re not allowed to collaborate.”  According to Section A of Faculty Member’s Information, unauthorized collaboration is defined as “working with others without the specific permission of the instructor on assignments.” Consequences for the first offense are up to the professor...