Opinion: summer classes are better than fall and spring classes

Opinion: summer classes are better than fall and spring classes

Ah, summer school. The movies portray it as some kind of dungeon that sucks up your summer while all your friends who did good in school enjoy the pool. Summer school does have a negative connotation to it. Some people view summer school as a place where degenerates go after partying too much and flunking their fall and spring classes. When college students hear that the classes are typically three weeks to eight weeks long yet still jam a whole semester into them, they think only sadists would do that to themselves. Summer school, however, is not only easier than traditional school, it’s faster, and it keeps you in the rhythm of school. At Lipscomb, there are four summer semesters: Maymester, Junemester and Julymester, and also a full summer semester that stretches throughout June and July. This summer, I took two classes in Maymester that lasted only three weeks, four classes in the full summer semester that only took eight weeks and another final class in Julymester that went along with the final three weeks of my full summer classes. I took 19 credit hours in the span of 12 weeks, as opposed to a 16-week traditional semester. I still get a three-week break before classes start up again in the Fall, which is the same amount of time as Christmas break, and all the time away I need. The pacing of summer classes is fantastic. Too many times in too many classes I have spent what feels like an eternity on one chapter or one concept that I got down in the first few days. Meeting twice a...
Department of visual arts set to move to Ward Hall, lacking natural light

Department of visual arts set to move to Ward Hall, lacking natural light

Lipscomb’s art students have been moved out of the James D. Hughes Center to make way for the new physician’s assistant program. The visual arts department is moving to Ward Hall for the upcoming semester. The change-up has been a part of a series of recent large-scale renovation efforts by President Lowry, including the building of the new Shinn Event Center this year and a new business building next year. The move has displaced the long-time Ward Hall occupants of the psychology department, who have been moved to the second floor of Ezell. The renovation was immediately started on Ward Hall in preparation for the department of visual arts to move in. Students of both majors are concerned as to where their classes are going to be held, as psychology classes are still listed to take place in Ward Hall classrooms that no longer exist. “I don’t have that much faith that they will have Ward completed and ready for us in the fall,” Lipscomb art major Carrie Hull said. Some of the art department will be moving to the new Shinn Center, namely animation and graphic design. Animation and graphic design had only one room in the Hughes Center. Currently, there is no information as to where animation and graphic design will be meeting as the department awaits the completion of the Shinn Center. “When I first heard about it, I thought, ‘That’s kind of upsetting that we’re not getting a part of the new building,’ but they are renovating the new building for us.” Hull said. The Lipscomb website has not been updated to reflect the art...
Guidelines promoting racial diversity in college admissions reversed by Trump

Guidelines promoting racial diversity in college admissions reversed by Trump

President Donald Trump’s administration has reversed a college admissions policy regarding the use of race in determining college applicants. The president’s new order rescinded federal guidance on affirmative action that was originally put in place by former president Barack Obama. The policy requested that schools factor the ethnicity of those they enrolled as a way to promote racial diversity and inclusion. The tool has been used across the country for private colleges as a way to grow their diversity. Now, colleges across the country can utilize a “blind” admissions process where they don’t incorporate a person’s race in admission. Lipscomb’s Vice President of Enrollment Byron Lewis spoke to WZTV about how the rule affects colleges. “There are a lot of institutions across the country that this isn’t a big factor, but for a lot of highly-selective and selective institutions, it is something that is certainly used as a tool, one of many, to be able to promote diversity on campus,” Lewis said. Trump’s administration has recently backed a group of students who have accused Harvard University of using the tool to discriminate against Asian-Americans during the admissions process. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been opposed to the rule. Last year, he announced he would bring an end to the Justice Department issuing guiding documents that bypassed the formation of actual law. “The American people deserve to have their voices heard and a government that is accountable to them,” Sessions said. “When issuing regulations, federal agencies must abide by constitutional principles and follow the rules set forth by Congress and the President in previous administrations, however, agencies often tried to...
Marvel scores big again with ‘Ant Man and the Wasp’

Marvel scores big again with ‘Ant Man and the Wasp’

Ant-Man and the Wasp is the first Marvel movie after Avengers: Infinity War left theater-goers speechless. Ant-Man and the Wasp is its own standalone movie that mingles very little with the other Marvel films, not confronting the cliffhangers in Infinity War. If you haven’t seen Infinity War yet, you don’t need to in order to understand and enjoy this film. Ant Man and the Wasp is possibly even the best film Marvel could have put out right after Infinity War as it allowed Marvel fans to stop stressing over the cliffhanger at the end of Infinity War and focus on another great superhero adventure that is going on at the same time. Ant-Man and the Wasp follows Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) way over on the other side of the United States in sunny San Fransisco, a place that doesn’t have much of a superhero presence (as opposed to New York City, where most of Marvel’s heroes live). Scott has been on house arrest now for two years following the events of Captain America: Civil War, and of course, he only has one week left until he is a free, non-superhero man. During his last week on house arrest, he has a dream about Hank Pym’s (Michael Douglas) wife, Janet Van Dyne (Michelle Pfeiffer) who has been trapped in the Quantum Realm since before the events of the first film. Scott then gets roped into another adventure with Hank and Hope Pym (Evangeline Lilly) to rescue Janet from the Quantum Realm. This time, Hope dons the suit of the Wasp, who can fly, has laser guns and is much more...
‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor’ offers look into Mister Rogers’ genuine care for children

‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor’ offers look into Mister Rogers’ genuine care for children

There’s nothing easy about being a child. Within only half-a-decade from birth, you’re expected to walk, talk, socialize, behave and conform to the “adult” way of your culture. Nowadays, a conversation about emotion and the nuances of life are rarely shared with children outright; instead, children are expected to just grow and guess how the adults have it figured out (we don’t).  This wasn’t always the case though. Several decades ago, a piano composer named Fred Rogers became upset with the way that early television treated its child audience. He was appalled with the silly and slapstick nature of  TV shows aimed at younger audiences. So he put aside his goal of being an ordained Presbyterian minister and set out to create a show that would speak to children at their level, with dignity and sincerity, while also displaying authority and wisdom. And he did exactly that. Every day, Fred Rogers would be “Mister Rogers” to the children of the Pittsburgh area, and then to the rest of the United States. Won’t You be my Neighbor is a very special kind of documentary. It isn’t a biopic on the inner workings of the man Fred Rogers, and it isn’t some history piece detailing Mister Roger’s Neighborhood and the way it came to be renowned in the United States. It’s a barely even a documentary. Really, it’s something far more wholesome. Won’t You be my Neighbor is a celebration of a time long past. It’s a presentation of ideas and ideologies of one genuinely kind man. The film does not go deep into Fred Roger’s personal life, nor does it...