Lipscomb University ranks 13th for best online schools for visual disabilities

Lipscomb University ranks 13th for best online schools for visual disabilities

Lipscomb University is ranked No. 13 in the rankings of best online colleges for those with visual disabilities. Auburn University was ranked first on the list. Other schools rated higher than Lipscomb include Florida State University (eighth place) and John Hopkins University (12th place). Notable schools finish below Lipscomb include Northwestern University (19th place) and Stanford University (24th place). The comprehensive list was compiled by the SR Education Group, which based the scores on such factors as Universal Design for Learning being implemented into the website layout. Schools also had to have at least 5 percent of their student bodies comprised of students with disabilities. The main goal of Lipscomb’s online program is to help students use skills they have already developed and apply them to the learning experience and help the students get to where they want to be in their lives. Lipscomb’s online programs have only been available to students since 2017. Just last year, Lipscomb’s online interface was redesigned and upgraded to better help with the education of the students and to help prospective students discover the information they needed in a concise manner. All 38 of the colleges listed can be found at 2019 Best Visual Disability-Friendly Online Colleges. Lipscomb University offers over 16 different online degree programs for undergraduate and graduate study. Prospective students can find out more information by visiting https://www.lipscomb.edu/online. The list was published by the website Guide to Online Schools, which has been helping prospective students find a good college fit since 2004. SR Education Group started the website in order to educate students on colleges that they could thrive in...
Lipscomb power outage gallery

Lipscomb power outage gallery

A power outage is affecting multiple buildings across campus today. The power has been out since at least 6:24 a.m. when the first alert email was sent out to students. The Lipscomb University Campus Service Operations team is still currently working to resolve the issue. Classes held in Beaman Library, Burton Health Sciences Center, Collins Auditorium, Swang Center, Ezell Center and the Student Activities Center are canceled until noon. The Gathering has been canceled and will not meet today. The affected academic buildings are Beaman Library, Collins Auditorium, Ezell Center, Swang Center and Burton Health Sciences Center. The dorm Johnson Hall is affected, as well as Allen Arena and McQuiddy Gym. Wifi is also out across these buildings.   Read full story by Cavin Jacobson...
BREAKING NEWS: Power outage affects classes, chapel

BREAKING NEWS: Power outage affects classes, chapel

A power outage is affecting multiple buildings across campus today. The power has been out since at least 6:24 a.m. when the first alert email was sent out to students. The Lipscomb University Campus Service Operations team is still currently working to resolve the issue. Classes held in Beaman Library, Burton Health Sciences Center, Collins Auditorium, Swang Center, Ezell Center and the Student Activities Center are canceled until noon. The Gathering has been canceled and will not meet today. Update — At around 12:53 p.m., Lipscomb sent a campus-wide email stating that “afternoon classes will resume as scheduled with the 1:20 p.m. class sessions.” With the exception of Allen Arena, Dugan Field, the Student Activities Center (SAC) and McQuiddy, most of the buildings have power now. SAC classes “will follow the Class Schedule Disruption Policy.” Update at 11 a.m. — A campus service operations member said a 13,800 volt splice went out. It was approximately 15 years old, so possibly due to its age, it died and consequently took out the rest of the line. “It’s an old splice,” he said. “Probably a 13,800 volt one that went out. We’ll get the power up soon.” Additionally, an email was sent out to the Lipscomb campus announcing that power was expected to come back on in the early afternoon. A splice allows multiple wires to carry a current, and since this one died, the power went out. They are currently rewiring so that they can remove the old splice and put in a new one. The affected academic buildings are Beaman Library, Collins Auditorium, Ezell Center, Swang Center and Burton...
Students cheat in new accelerated MBA program

Students cheat in new accelerated MBA program

Two-thirds of the 32 graduate students in Lipscomb’s new Fast Track MBA program were found to have cheated on an online, take-home final exam. “I found out from one of my colleagues who apparently heard from a student in the class,” said Dr. Joe Ivey, the professor of Applied Value Creation, the course in question, which ended in September. “Against the directions of the teacher and against the directions on the test, they decided to get together, and do the test,” said George Brammeier, a student in the class, who did not receive any help on the test. Twenty-one of 32 students in the brand-new program were found to be cheating on the exam. Lipscomb’s Academic Integrity Board oversees issues of cheating and plagiarism. The board does not step in unless it is a student’s second offense. For a student’s first offense, the consequences are at the discretion of the professor of the course. Ivey said he will meet individually with each student and decide what actions will be taken. Dr. Rick Holaway is in his first year as Lipscomb’s director of graduate programs, and said he was “disappointed” with the students. “In the College of Business, one of our values is credibility, which ties in honesty and integrity and all those sorts of things,” Holaway said. “So it’s really a good teachable moment.” Students were instructed to take the final exam online, through Canvas, from home. It consisted of two parts, with a majority of students doing poorly on the first section, Brammeier said. The second part, which the class took a week later, consisted of writing problems...
Hurricane Florence’s aftermath continues to affect Lipscomb students

Hurricane Florence’s aftermath continues to affect Lipscomb students

Hurricane Florence brought historic flooding to the Carolina coast last week, causing permanent damage to the region. Only 500 miles separates Nashville from the epicenter of where the storm hit in North Carolina, and many students from North Carolina here at Lipscomb have worried about whether or not their families were OK, or whether they would have a home to return to. “I was and have been really concerned about Florence, for my family along the coast and about the impact it would have on my two home states,” said Allie Glenn, whose immediate family lives in Charleston but has extended family in coastal North Carolina. “My family stocked up on a lot of essentials from stores, basically preparing in case they lost power or if Charleston were to flood,” Glenn said. “Classes were canceled for the whole week for my cousins in college.” Hurricane Florence is expected to do upwards of 22 billion dollars worth of property damage when the flooding finally subsides, but Florence will never truly be over, as it is expected to reshape the Carolinas drastically, as well as major disaster protocol for the rest of the United States. “I have lots of family in Samson County, North Carolina . . . and they are still out of power and will probably be for weeks,” student Aubrea Holland said. “They had lots of flooding and a lot of water damage. There was a mandatory evacuation order; however they have farms and animals and were forced to stay to take care of them. My uncle is also a first responder, so he and his family stayed...