‘Happy Death Day’ falls short of ‘Groundhog Day’ genre films

‘Happy Death Day’ falls short of ‘Groundhog Day’ genre films

“Happy Death Day” delivers a unique take on the “Groundhog Day” inspired genre. Jessica Rothe (La La Land) plays Tree Gelbman, a stereotypical sorority girl who lives a life of late night parties and early morning hangovers. With her mother’s passing and birthday on the same date, she has become reluctant to celebrate. She begins her day by waking up with a hangover and realizing she’s in Carter’s bed, played by Israel Broussard. He offers to cure her hangover but she quickly denies the help and begins the walk of shame back to the sorority house. On the way home, she receives multiple phone calls from her father, which she ignores. Her roommate and loyal friend, Lori (Ruby Modine) attempt to celebrate Gelbman’s birthday but are both soon turned down. Gelbman later stops at her professor’s office inside a hospital, where the audience learns that the two are having an affair. While walking to a party later in the day, she finds herself approached by the killer. In a last attempt of survival, she fights to get rid of the killer but to no avail. To her surprise, she wakes up at the beginning of the day and begins to relive it. Gelbman initially believes that she has had a bad dream and continues the day as normal, but in doing so the same outcome happens. Realizing that this is not a dream, she confides in Carter about her situation and he helps her find out who the killer is. She spends her each repeated day investigating which one of her friends or acquaintances wanted her dead. During her investigation, she realizes the error of her ways in how she treated people and how her actions affect the people who truly care about her. At the end of the...
‘You’re Not Alone’ offers on-campus support for suicide-awareness

‘You’re Not Alone’ offers on-campus support for suicide-awareness

You’re Not Alone (YNA) was once a program for only graduate students, but the organization has now become accessible to the entire student body. YNA is different from the counseling center, being a student-led organization. The current President, Lis Leudemann, is acting in her second semester as president, earning the position last February. For Leudemann, the desire for YNA was to give students with mental health struggles a safe place and to a establish an overall more welcoming environment on campus. “I wanted YNA to be something that looks out for the student body,” Leudemann said. “It makes for a better community for people who are mentally ill and makes Lipscomb a more accepting and aware society.” She expresses that before YNA was established, Lipscomb was not necessarily putting the issue of mental health on the back-burner, but rather they “put it to the side.” She recalled that during September in 2016, which is nationally known as suicide-awareness month, nothing was publicly done in acknowledgment. This past September, however, has presented many events to raise awareness for the issue, such as a viewing of the documentary “Looking for Luke.” The junior psychology major shed light on some of the issues that victims of mental illness face in America. “There’s a stigma surrounding mental illness,” she said, “that people with mental illness or who have anxiety are crazy or messed up or it is their fault.” Leudemann sayid that might discourage those struggling with mental health from seeking help. Since being diagnosed with OCD at age 13, Leudemann has dealt with the issues firsthand and understands what it is like to cope with the illness on campus. After realizing she needed help, Leudemann started counseling through the counseling center as a...
Lebron Hill shares personal experience at President Lowry’s table

Lebron Hill shares personal experience at President Lowry’s table

Last Thursday, President Randy Lowry invited the African American student body to his house for dinner and conversation. I was in attendance, and what I saw that night was insensitive to African American culture. What stood out to me was the cotton in the mason jars placed on the dinner tables. Being exposed to it before, I tried to make light of it by seeing the irony — I let go of it, keeping in mind the good intention of the night. We then headed into the President’s House to have conversation. After Mr. and Mrs. Lowry told their story, they gave the floor to the students to share their story. We ran out of time to have discussion, but the President did tell the audience they could ask him anything at the end of the night. The next day, talk began to take circulate about what happened. I told my professor about it, and he was shocked by what took place. At that point in the day, I had no knowledge of the conversations on social media. Later in the day, an apology was sent out to the entire student body. Channel 4 News got word as well, and the conversation surrounding the night grew. During the weekend, many people talked to me about the night. On one side, people felt that the décor was more-so southern heritage rather than an offensive material. On the other side, many felt that the decoration was contextually inappropriate and should have not been on display. The conversation continued into the following week. The Diverse Student Coalition facilitated panel discussions featuring students...
Weekly Gathering announces new partnership with Coca-Cola

Weekly Gathering announces new partnership with Coca-Cola

After several years under contract with Pepsi, Lipscomb is now a “Coca-Cola campus” as announced this Tuesday during the Gathering in Allen Arena. James Franklin III serves as the CEO for the bottling company and spoke to the student body about his commitment to Lipscomb. After he showed a video highlighting his son, James Baak, and his trip to South Sudan, he invited the Coca-Cola Polar Bear to the stage alongside Vice President of Student Life Josh Roberts. Together they told the crowd about the several Coca-Cola sponsored events happening on campus soon. Baak is the founder of SMARD, Solidarity Ministries Africa for Reconciliation and Development. SMARD’s mission is to empower women and children of South Sudan by educating them and giving them the freedom to find confidence in themselves. Born and raised in South Sudan, Baak dealt with great turmoil as a young boy and told the story of how he had to flee to Ethiopia. “The travel in length was Nashville to Denver,” he said. At first, Baak wished to return home. However, it was after a dream featuring a man in white clothing, giving him a bible and telling him to fight onward that he found Christ. After gaining an education and becoming a pastor, Baak went back to his home country of South Sudan and planted a church while helping other churches there reach their maximum potential. He said he hopes that his mission will continue to touch others and raise awareness surrounding the women and children of South...

‘Wonder Woman’ writer brings inspiration and advice to Lipscomb

Lipscomb students and alumni gathered in Shamblin theatre on Friday for the College of Entertainment and Arts’ first speaker of the year. Film and TV writer Allan Heinberg has written for films and TV shows, such as “Scandal,” “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Wonder Woman.” He’s also written comics for both DC Comics and Marvel Entertainment. Heinberg started the night talking about his upbringing in Tulsa, Oklahoma, being both Jewish and openly gay. After graduating high school, he soon realized that Tulsa was not the place for him, so he attended Yale University to study acting. While at Yale, Heinberg was active in his craft. He auditioned for and performing in many shows, but he felt his true passion was writing. After graduating from Yale, the “Wonder Woman” writer spent 10 years on Broadway performing. In that time, he experienced the woes of being an actor while starring in “Laughter on the 23rd Floor.” Soon after that, he decided that acting wasn’t for him. After appearing in two other plays, he decided to reevaluate his career. It was then that the GLAAD Media Award winning writer chose to transition to behind-the-scenes and become a writer. During the Friday night event, he analyzed some scenes from “The Catch” and “Wonder Woman.” He explained that his style of writing is based on realistic relationships. He gave an example of that in a scene from “The Catch.” Heinberg conveyed how the characters’ relationship between each other affects the tension in the scene. Relationships being his focus, Heinberg told the audience that his message in the movie was not action but connection. He then credited his years of acting for helping his ability to write the best stories...