Living as a black man in America: thoughts on the wrongful shooting of Stephon Clark

Living as a black man in America: thoughts on the wrongful shooting of Stephon Clark

As a young kid, my mom played “Changes” by Tupac Shakur every time we drove around in my hometown of Tullahoma, Tennessee. “That’s just the way it is, Things will never be the same” — lyrics I think about every time I see a shooting of an unarmed black man. Recently, Stephon Clark, 22, was shot and killed in the backyard of his grandmother’s Sacramento home, after police suspected he had a gun. Later, the police discovered it was only a cell phone. In weeks since the shooting, protests were held in Sacramento that shut down a Sacramento Kings game. This week, Clark’s funeral was held in a South Sacramento church, where family and friends said their goodbyes to Clark. He left behind a wife and two daughters. Watching the body camera of the Clark shooting, you can see the policeman chasing him into the backyard, then stopping and taking cover at the side of the house. The two officers then shoot him eight times, mostly in the back. Once Clark is on the ground, you can hear police officers tell him to get up. You then hear one of the officers say “Hey mute?” and then the audio is cut off. The pressure and risk that the police go through in their jobs goes without question. Not all police are bad. But there are other ways to deal with a suspect then to fatally shoot them, and Stephon Clark’s shooting shows a lack compassion from the police. In the video, Clark is shown running away from them and stopped at a considerable distance away from the officers. At...
Listen: Do video games correlate with violence?

Listen: Do video games correlate with violence?

Video games and violence have been a topic of discussion since 1994, when “Mortal Kombat” became the first video game to receive a parental guidance rating for its gory graphics and crude violence. First-person shooters are now under the microscope. Listen to this radio story below....
Listen: Nashville gun reform march draws 10,000

Listen: Nashville gun reform march draws 10,000

Over 10,000 people attended the March for Our Lives event in Nashville Saturday. Led by Vanderbilt University freshman Abby Brafman, the march took place a week after the one-month anniversary of the Parkland school shooting in Parkland, Fla., in which 17 students were killed. Attending the march were supporters of gun reform and people affected by gun violence. Photo by LeBron Hill. Listen to the radio story below. ...
Nashville mayor resigns over affair, pleads guilty to felony theft

Nashville mayor resigns over affair, pleads guilty to felony theft

Embattled Nashville mayor Megan Barry resigned Tuesday morning and pleaded guilty to felony theft. Revelations of Barry’s affair with former police Sgt. Rob Forrest, her top security official have rocked the city since they emerged five weeks ago. Forrest, who retired the day that Barry admitted the affair, earned more than $170,000 in overtime pay during the affair as he accompanied the mayor on cross-country and overseas trips, as well as to hot yoga classes and events on the mayor’s social calendar. Three ongoing investigations pushed Barry to resign. In February, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation discovered photos of a nude woman presumed to be Barry on Forrest’s phone, which were dated during official trips, purporting to prove that the affair went on while Forrest was “on the clock,” which Barry had denied vehemently. Metro City Council’s special investigative committee will decide this evening in a planned meeting whether or not to continue investigating Barry’s use of taxpayer dollars. As part of a plea deal, both Forrest and Barry will serve three years of probation. Barry will reimburse the city $11,000. Forrest will reimburse the city $45,000 of salary. In a press conference announcing the resignation Tuesday morning, Barry thanked her staff and department heads and did not take questions. “It has been my honor and it has been the privilege of my entire professional life to have the blessing and the opportunity to be your mayor,” she said. She asked Nashville citizens to support Vice Mayor David Briley, her successor. Barry, 54, was a rising star in the Democratic party thanks to her mixture of business-friendly and socially...
Mayor admits affair with top security guard

Mayor admits affair with top security guard

Nashville mayor Megan Barry admitted Wednesday to having an affair with the head of her security detail dating back to spring 2016. The controversy comes while Barry is trying to sell the public on her $5.2 billion transit plan. The Metro Council votes next week on putting the transit plan on the ballot in May, a key step for the mayor’s plan. Barry’s affair with Metro Police Sgt. Robert Forrest Jr. reportedly lasted for a year. Sgt. Forrest earned $50,000 in overtime wages during that period. “I’m embarrassed, and I am sad, and I am so sorry for all the pain that I have caused my family and his family,” she said at a news conference Wednesday. “I know that God will forgive me, but that Nashville doesn’t have to. … I hope that I can earn your trust back and that you will forgive me.” Lipscomb professor of political science Dr. Marc Schwerdt agreed that the scandal will affect the voting for the transit plan. “It’s going to personalize this referendum from her,” Schwerdt said. “It becomes a referendum on her instead of just about the merits of that plan.” A metro council committee chairwoman announced Friday that she planned to create an investigative special committee to look into the use of taxpayer dollars and Barry’s trips around the time of the affair. The mayor spoke at the youth summit held at on campus last...