REVIEW: Captain Marvel features sturdy storyline and cast, overdone themes

REVIEW: Captain Marvel features sturdy storyline and cast, overdone themes

Transitions can be hard — moving out of your parents’ house and actually paying bills, or when your university changes from Pepsi to Coke. #neverforget With Marvel’s highly anticipated “Avengers: Endgame” premiering late next month, “Captain Marvel” sneaks in as the last superhero introduced in Phase Three, Marvel’s timeline of character storylines, thus transitioning into the next chapter of the Marvel Universe. The movie isn’t anything too spectacular; it doesn’t help that it’s placed in the middle of “Infinity War” and “Endgame,” acting as an appetizer before we devour the main course. Captain Marvel (Brie Larson) finds herself right in the middle of the war between the warmongering Kree and the shapeshifting Skrulls. With her mind swiped of her memories, Carol Danvers must hone her newly-found radioactive powers and regain who she is. The storyline is solid, but the overall ideas and themes are overdone. You enter into “Total Recall“ territory with the lost memory premise and then combine that with an intergalactic war of “Star Wars” proportions and sprinkle in “Star Trek”-like cosmetics. Larson’s supporting cast is a bright spot of the film, which is led by Jude Law (Sherlock Holmes) and Ben Mendelsohn (Rogue One), and you can’t have a Marvel movie without the Kangol-wearing king of box office blockbusters, Samuel L. Jackson. It makes sense that casting for this film would be so strong, considering how importantly the storytelling in this film will lead into more to come. In the comics, Captain Marvel becomes the new leader of the Avengers with Iron Man passing the torch to her. It seems to be the way the movies...
Painting featuring two men kissing in ‘Colour Somewhere’ exhibit on campus will not be removed

Painting featuring two men kissing in ‘Colour Somewhere’ exhibit on campus will not be removed

A painting featuring two African American men embracing one another in a kiss in the “Colour Somewhere” exhibit in the Hutcheson gallery will not be taken down, despite initial concerns from Lipscomb administration. Curator Lawrence Matthews III said his decision to choose the piece reflects the overall message of the gallery. “I try to represent all of the different aspects of blackness that are not always highlighted in the forefront — but also the wholeness — black people in love, existing in their own element,” Matthews said. In the piece by D’Angelo Williams entitled “The Lovers,” two black men wearing white tank tops are embracing each other in a kiss while their faces are each covered  by Du-Rags. The piece is inspired by the 1928 painting under the same title by Rene Magritte. The original painting features a heterosexual couple with the same concept, faces covered by white cloth in an embrace. The male figure wears a black suit and tie with a solid white shirt. He embraces a woman clad in a red, sleeveless garment with white trim. Matthews said Lipscomb staff contacted him on the day of the event with concerns of “vulgarity” within some of the artwork, but Matthews noted that the actual night of the premiere went smoothly. A couple of weeks after the opening, he received word of negative reactions to Williams’ photo. “I got a text that someone was uncomfortable about that piece and that it had to come down,” Matthews said. “I immediately called the art department, and I’m like, ‘If that piece comes down, I’m taking the whole show down.’” Mike...
OPINION: Oh wall, where art thou wall?

OPINION: Oh wall, where art thou wall?

Donald Trump has been on a mission to “build that wall” since his 2016 presidential campaign. Flash forward to 2019 and Trump is continuing to make good on his word to create a wall spanning the entire length of the southern border of the United States. Trump’s mission has become yet another wedge into the already divided society in America. The issue is not whether or not we need better defense surrounding the border, but how we go about it. When someone speaks of keeping their family safe, they do not speak of one race or people being the main threat. Their goal is to make sure they’ve taken any measure to keep their family safe from anyone or anything. Everyone can agree on that. A more divisive way to say that would be,  “I want to keep every black and brown person away from my home because they’re all criminals.” No one person, race or sexual orientation can be accountable for the actions of a few. However, it’s become a common concern for Trump supporters to believe that immigrants pose a threat. It’s hard to imagine how immigrants and refugees (yes, there is a difference) who are leaving everything behind — friends, family, work, comfort — can be considered more of a threat than the 42 percent of Americans who have access to a gun. There’s no wrong answer when talking about border security. Yes, we need to protect our borders from any threat to our country. Other presidents have tried to do this before him, including President Obama.  However, condemning someone for wanting a better life is...