Lipscomb baseball scores big during Mule Mix Classic

Lipscomb baseball scores big during Mule Mix Classic

Over the weekend, Lipscomb baseball hosted the Mule Mix Classic and took home a winning record of 2-1, beating Northwestern and Bowling Green while coming up short against Missouri State. The Bisons first faced Bowling Green and did not have a problem handling the Falcons. The game was low-scoring, with only two runs that were both scored by the Bisons. Brady Puckett was on the mound for the Bisons, pitching a complete game. The Bisons beat the Falcons 2-0. Up next was the Missouri State team. The Bisons were ahead by the fourth inning but the Bears took the lead in the sixth. By the start of the eighth inning, the Bisons were down 4-3. Because of a home run hit by Michael Gigliotti, the Bisons tied the game 4-4 and headed into extra innings. By the end of the 11th inning, the Bisons failed to score two men on base and lost to the Bears 6-4. The last game of the tournament was against the Northwestern Wildcats. The game showcased ten pitchers in total on the mound. The game had nine pass balls and wild pitches. “We get used to playing three games in a row,” head coach Jeff Forehand said. “It’s something that is not unusual for them.” The Wildcats came into the game with a record of 0-5.  At the top of the second inning, the Wildcats took a 2-0 lead. The Bisons came back in the bottom of the second, scoring six runs to take a 6-2 lead. In the top of the seventh, Northwestern’s Matt Hopfner hit a Grand Slam, making the score 8-6. The Bisons were able to stack more runs onto their...
Office of Intercultural Development hosts leadership seminar

Office of Intercultural Development hosts leadership seminar

Students, faculty and staff welcomed Dr. Jerrund Wilkerson Saturday as the Office of Intercultural Development invited him to speak at a leadership seminar entitled “10 Key Qualities Of An Effective Leader.” Wilkerson focused on ten qualities from John Maxwell’s book, The 

21 Indispensable Qualities of Leadership. “There is a vacuum of leadership in America,” he said. Wilkerson spoke of each quality separately, explaining the significance and using the DISC behavior test to show the audience the different behaviors that make up the country. Each behavior has its own effectiveness to being a leader, according to Wilkerson. “Average is the enemy of great,” he said “Be the best you can be and the rest will follow. “I’ve always had a talent toward leadership and to see possibilities. Along the way I found that I had the ability to inspire people. I found that I wanted to make things better for people.” Wilkerson said that in order to help other people, he had to first focus on himself. For Christians, Dr. Wilkerson quoted the book of Matthew to explain what it means to be leaders. “We’re called to be light and we’re called to be salt,” he said. “Light and salt is about influence, so we’re called to influence. This means that we all have some ability to influence. “Lead yourself effectively because that’s where you start. People follow people who are trying to go...
‘Muslim Ban’ raises questions among students, faculty

‘Muslim Ban’ raises questions among students, faculty

Within the first two weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency, he has given 20 executive orders. The suspension of immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries, commonly known as the “Muslim ban,” is considered the most controversial of these orders. The order has caused some division among people; on one side, many believe that it is best for the safety of our country, yet people on the opposing side of the order suggest that it is a violation of human rights. Freshman Ahmed Amaar is a Muslim and a member of the Lipscomb Track and Field team. Amaar believes that the ban is ineffective, stating that the terrorists that have been behind recent attacks are not from the seven countries that were included in the ban. “I’m from Libya myself, and some of my family members have green cards, and if they would have been out of the country, they wouldn’t have allowed them back in,” Amaar said. He added that many people of the Muslim faith are hard-working, dedicated citizens who are treated unfairly because of their color and where they come from. “Whenever there is a terrorist attack, that one person doesn’t speak for the whole religion,” Amaar said. “That is something we’re trying to convey to everyone, and people are starting to understand and have better relations with Muslims. “I need to extend the same courtesy to the U.S.A,” he continued. “If one person treats me badly, I know he’s not speaking for the whole country.” In his closing remarks, Ahmed expressed that he, personally, loves everyone regardless of faith, color or sexual orientation. For Lipscomb student Sam...