GLUTEN-FREE FRIDAY: Juice Bar gives health-boost for spring break

GLUTEN-FREE FRIDAY: Juice Bar gives health-boost for spring break

With Nashville’s weather being as unpredictable as *insert typical Southern phrase here*, Berry Hill’s Juice Bar is a welcome sanctuary of healthy choices for all eaters. Juice Bar, located only two miles from campus, offers more than just refreshing, vitamin-filled juices. With various food choices, like spring rolls and sandwiches, smoothies/smoothie bowls, and even shots (don’t worry–they’re non-alcoholic), Juice Bar is a local hero for everyone who wants to be healthy and/or stay that way. One of my personal favorite menu choices at Juice Bar is the dragonfruit smoothie bowl. First off, the color of the smoothie bowl is a stunning deep pink, which I think only enhances the whole eating experience. The bowl tastes bright and spunky, with its sweet mango complimented by the zingy dragonfruit, all topped off with honey, bananas and strawberries. If you’re gluten-free, make sure to ask for no granola—maybe they’ll be nice and sub cacao nibs or another gluten-free treat for you instead. Another favorite for me is the Pad Thai Noodle Bowl. The noodles are made from sweet potatoes, which provide a light yet sturdy texture that works well as noodles. The sauce is sweet and perfectly seasoned, with seeds and cashews on top, making it a protein-rich, gluten-free meal.  If you are feeling under the weather, but you’re still not quite brave enough to try one of Juice Bar’s Power Shots, like the Ginger & Cayenne shot, go for the Sweet Greens juice. Sweet Greens contains the perfect combination of fruits and vegetables, including lemon, kale, spinach, cucumber and parsley. Yes, parsley. I’m not about the parsley-eating life, but if you...
Three Singarama directors share passion for annual competition

Three Singarama directors share passion for annual competition

Singarama is less than one month away.  Students are busy choreographing, rehearsing, writing and directing three separate shows for one of Lipscomb’s biggest annual events. Each of the three individual Singarama productions is directed by Lipscomb students, and this year the directors are seniors Myron Sailors and Amy Hurd and junior Tori Thurmond. While all three directors have performed in Singarama before, this is their first time directing.  “It’s been super interesting seeing people come out of the woodwork with their own gifts and talents that they want to put forth towards the show,” said Sailors, a bioscience and philosophy major. Hurd, a marketing major, said she agreed that directing has given her a different perspective on Singarama. “Not just sitting back but being actively engaged in making all of these ideas come to life has been really fun during practices for me,” Hurd said. “It’s awesome to be able to contribute to every single portion.” As directors, Sailors, Hurd and Thurmond are responsible for a range of tasks, including designing a rehearsal timeline and coordinating and communicating with performers. In addition, Sailors said he believes that part of his role includes “a responsibility to try and keep morale up.” “I love Singarama, so I want it to be fun for everybody,” Sailors said. Thurmond, an English major, was on the production team for Singarama last year when she was a sophomore. She said she thinks it’s important to have a range of ages on the team, not just upperclassmen. “I knew that I could carry that on to the next year, and I think it’s very important for...
GLUTEN FREE FRIDAY: Columbia’s Dotted Lime produces Wonka-quality delights

GLUTEN FREE FRIDAY: Columbia’s Dotted Lime produces Wonka-quality delights

Every restaurant has pros and cons. For The Dotted Lime, the con is that the restaurant is located one hour from Lipscomb, but thankfully the pros are…everything else. Friends, The Dotted Lime is where gluten-free dreams come true. I’m half-convinced Willy Wonka actually works there. Not because they have a chocolate river in the restaurant (honestly, I believe they can do anything), but because their gluten and dairy-free cinnamon rolls are on the Wonka-level of being unbelievably good. (It’s a real level…look it up.) I’ll admit that Columbia, Tennessee, the cute small town in which Lime is located, may not be the tourist destination of the year. My hope, however, is that reading this will encourage you to think of it instead as a gluten-free pilgrimage, with The Dotted Lime as the ultimate destination. A journey, to be sure, but worth it, in my humble opinion. One of the most noteworthy elements of The Dotted Lime is that the entire restaurant is gluten-free, so you don’t have to worry about cross-contamination. It’s also lovely to be able to choose from 100% of the menu items, instead of 10%-50% of choices on a typical restaurant’s menu. What a win-win for my gluten-free people! My second Lime spotlight shines on its “world famous” cinnamon rolls. If you ate one without knowing it was gluten-free and dairy-free, you’d probably never guess it was. Yes, the cinnamon rolls are that good. Mysteriously gluten-like in their chewy texture, perfect to pull apart/unroll (the only correct way to eat a cinnamon roll, by the way), and comforting, with an addicting flavor and sweetness, Lime’s cinnamon...
Seven students make Lipscomb history

Seven students make Lipscomb history

Out of the seven Lipscomb students who were nominated for the Fulbright Scholar Program, all seven have gone on to become semi-finalists. In the past, the highest number of Lipscomb students to achieve Fulbright semi-finalist status in one year was one. This year, all seven nominated Lipscomb students or recent graduates were accepted as semi-finalists into Fulbright, which is a prestigious international exchange program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Dr. Paul Prill, Lipscomb’s Fulbright program adviser and director of the Honors College, said this recognition was unusual for “a school like Lipscomb,” since most Fulbright Program finalists come from larger universities, like the University of Michigan and Cornell University. “This is unprecedented for Lipscomb,” Prill said. “It’s really good for Lipscomb to be able to point to the academic success the students are having.” One of the semi-finalists, Lipscomb senior Maribeth Beyer, shared her thoughts on what this means for her and Lipscomb. “We’re not Yale, Harvard [or] Vanderbilt, but we are moving up,” said Beyer, adding, “and any opportunity I have to take Lipscomb further than Nashville is an incredible opportunity for me.” According to Dr. Prill, Fulbright applicants have about a five percent chance of becoming a semi-finalist, and semi-finalists have approximately a 30 to 50 percent chance of becoming a finalist. Once accepted into the program, Fulbright scholars will have the opportunity to live in a country of their choosing, either as an English teaching assistant, a researcher or a student, for approximately one year, depending on the program and grant. Bigger countries, like Spain and Germany, often...
‘Tennessean’ reporter gives career, life advice to students

‘Tennessean’ reporter gives career, life advice to students

The Tennessean’s Vanderbilt beat reporter Adam Sparks came to campus to speak to Lipscomb students about the importance of being flexible and honest in their careers. Lipscomb hosted its first Media Masters of the semester on Tuesday evening, with sophomore journalism major Spencer Boehme interviewing Sparks during the evening. Sparks, a graduate of MTSU, has been a sports writer for 19 years. He has won numerous journalism awards, including National Beat Writer of the Year. Throughout his writing career, he has covered a variety of stories, from reporting on the Titans and the Nashville Sounds to flag football and elementary basketball. Sparks encouraged Lipscomb students to be open to a variety of job opportunities, paid or unpaid. “If you are given an opportunity to work, you say ‘Yes,’” said Sparks, noting that unpaid or low-pay opportunities should not necessarily be looked down upon. “You have to get your foot in the door, [in] some way or some fashion,” Sparks said. Sparks gave an example from his own life, explaining that he often accepted reporting opportunities that were generally looked down upon, an attitude and choice which Sparks said he believes gains reporters respect. He also discussed the importance of work flexibility to non-journalism careers, sharing a story of his friend who wanted to be a loan officer but finally accepted a job as a bank teller, due to his lack of experience, and was later promoted to vice president. “The reason he got there is he finally said, ‘I’ll take whatever bottom position you’re offering me,’” Sparks said. In addition to his career as a professional reporter, Sparks is also...