GLUTEN-FREE FRIDAY: 12 South’s Burger Up offers tasty gluten-free & vegetarian options

GLUTEN-FREE FRIDAY: 12 South’s Burger Up offers tasty gluten-free & vegetarian options

Well-accessorized burgers, tasty fries and a generous lettuce wrap. All this less than two miles from campus. Welcome to Burger Up.  With holidays officially here and family coming in town, it’s important to know which nearby restaurants combine great flavor with healthy, allergy-friendly offerings that can please everyone. Remember, Uncle Matt is vegetarian, and Aunt Julie is sensitive to gluten and dairy. Thankfully, Burger Up can serve both Uncle Matt and Aunt Julie something tasty to suit them. One of the main things I like about Burger Up is the variety of burgers they have. There’s the hearty Bison burger, the flavorful Troyathlon or Marathon veggie burgers or the savory Turkey burger, all of which can be ordered with an up-charged gluten-free bun. Or, if you’re on the grain-free route, Burger Up even offers a plentiful wrap of fresh, strong lettuce leaves to sandwich your burger. If you go all in on the gluten and dairy fronts, be adventurous and try the Ramsey Pimento Cheese burger, or the Byrd, which combines fried chicken, white cheddar cheese and truffle aioli. Ordering a side of truffle fries is the cherry on top.  My regular order is Burger Up’s turkey burger. Since it automatically comes without cheese, I appreciate not having to worry about paying for something I can’t eat. The burger is topped with mayo and caramelized onions, which really makes the meal. The burger is decently filling, even without the bun, especially if you get a side. The pre-tax/gratuity total for the lettuce-wrapped turkey burger, which comes with fries, ends up being $11, which is quite reasonable for a nice 12...
Lipscomb offers three safety steps for active shooter situations

Lipscomb offers three safety steps for active shooter situations

Lipscomb wants to get ahead of the curve by preparing students and faculty in advance for emergency scenarios. School shootings are happening at an alarming, weekly rate in the United States. While Lipscomb may not be able to avoid an active shooter situation, but it is trying to do everything it can to prevent the situation, as well as to ensure its students and staff are safe and equipped. “We aren’t hopeful that something will happen,” Lipscomb’s Assistant Vice President of Risk Management Kathy Hargis said. “[But] yet, we want to be prepared, just in case that it does.” Hargis trains faculty and staff to hold to a three-step rule in active shooter situations: Flee, hide, and fight. First, students should flee the compromised area, if possible. Second, if they are unable to safely leave the premises, students should hide where they are after turning off surrounding lights and locking nearby doors. The third step is a personal option, according to Hargis. If students are approached by the shooter, students are encouraged to defend themselves by using any surrounding objects as a defense or a distraction. The Bison Alert text messaging system is the emergency communication system through which Lipscomb students receive notifications . In the event of an emergency situation, Hargis believes students will receive the text warning of a shooter, including the shooter’s location on campus. Hargis realizes that students may be frightened, due to the amount of shootings happening lately in the country, but she encourages students to recognize recent shooting facts. “It’s really a small percentage on college campuses of active shooters, when you look...
Homecoming 2018: what to expect

Homecoming 2018: what to expect

Homecoming is right around the corner, with festivities starting this Friday, November 9. One of the many events taking place this weekend is the student-inspired and led Homecoming Parade. The parade will take place on Friday, November 9th from 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Participating students will travel around campus and end in front of Allen Arena on floats featuring the theme, “Tame the Tigers.” Another event this weekend is the Friday evening “Lipscomb Honors: An Evening of Story and Song.” This Country Music Hall of Fame-hosted program begins with a reception at 5:30 p.m. and dinner at 6:30 p.m., and it costs $100. During the event, Lipscomb will bestow honor on several Lipscomb alumni, recognizing “the profound impact they’re making on the world,” according to the Homecoming webpage. Saturday’s main events kicks off with the Hall of Fame induction of seven Lipscomb alumni. The event will be held in the Student Activity Center and will start at 11 a.m. The cost is $25 per person.  The student group tailgate is also happening this weekend, starting at 12:30 p.m. in the Allen Arena Circle. The men’s and women’s basketball games are another celebrated part of the weekend. The women’s team is playing Tennessee State University (TSU) on Friday evening at 6:30 p.m. The men’s game against TSU is at 3 p.m. on Saturday. Both games are free, and you can register for your free ticket online. Alumni from all 10 colleges are expected at the game, Phil Ellenburg, Lipscomb’s Vice President of Alumni Relations, said. They will also mingle at a reunion in McQuiddy Gymnasium during halftime. Finally, the...
Lipscomb organizes hurricane relief trips to Panama City, FL

Lipscomb organizes hurricane relief trips to Panama City, FL

Lipscomb’s Missions department is planning two trips to help Panama City, Florida, hurricane survivors over Thanksgiving and Winter breaks. An email was sent to students earlier this week about the Thanksgiving break relief trip, and students can register for the trip in the email. The deadline for securing a spot is 10 a.m. on November 2. It has been over three weeks since Hurricane Michael hit Florida, taking lives, devastating cities and leaving millions of households without power.  The hurricane may not be active anymore, but countless residents are still feeling the effects of the Category 4 hurricane. Homes still need to be cleaned and rebuilt, and hope needs restoration.  Josh Self, Lipscomb’s Missions Coordinator, has organized two upcoming hurricane relief trips for students to participate in this month and next.  Students played a significant role in organizing the Hurricane Michael relief teams. Several Lipscomb students even have family and friends who were personally affected by the hurricane. “Students immediately began to ask how they could help once Hurricane Michael made landfall,” Self said.  The trips are scheduled during Thanksgiving break, November 15-19 and Winter break, December 13-19. Both trips will go to Panama City, Florida, one of the most-affected cities in Florida. The cost is $200, which covers transportation and travel food. Housing, meals and supplies will be provided by a disaster relief organization that will be hosting Lipscomb’s teams.  Students will be providing relief in a variety of ways, namely “muding-out,” cleaning up, and rebuilding. “Mud-out involves removal of drywall and insulation that was ruined by the flooding,” Self said. “Cleanup will consist mostly of picking up...
Hurricane Michael destroys parts of southeast, affecting homes of Lipscomb students

Hurricane Michael destroys parts of southeast, affecting homes of Lipscomb students

Hurricane Michael tore through parts of the southeast starting October 10th, claiming the title of the worst storm to hit the United States since Hurricane Camille in 1969, according to an ABC News article. “It’s a sad time when you go on Google and search for images of your town and you see devastation, not beautiful beaches,” said Allison Lewis of Lynn Haven, Florida, the town her family lives in, which was recently destroyed by Hurricane Michael. Two of Florida’s panhandle cities, Mexico Beach and Panama City, were especially wrecked by the category four hurricane. Other southeastern states, like North Carolina, Virginia, Alabama and Georgia, were also affected. According to CNN, at least 32 lives have been claimed by the hurricane, and over 1,000 people are missing, according to a BBC News article. Additionally, homes and buildings have been literally ripped apart, and millions of homes are without power. Hurricane Michael’s strength came as a surprise to some. For Orlando-raised Lipscomb student Jeffrey Crisan, the hurricanes he lived through growing up were a fun excuse to play in the rain. “It’s really weird, because, when I lived in Florida and I went through hurricanes, it wasn’t really scary,” Crisan said. He added that his family in Panama City, Florida, felt similarly unconcerned about the latest hurricane, noting that they were “all just hanging out.” Unlike Crisan’s family, Lipscomb student Allison Lewis’ family in Lynn Haven, Florida, which is between Panama City and Mexico Beach, decided to evacuate. However, they “returned right after to help out,” according to Lewis. Being ten hours away from his Floridian family left Crisan more...