Lumination bids farewell to its 2019 graduating seniors

Lumination bids farewell to its 2019 graduating seniors

On May 4, this year’s seniors will be graduating, including those who have helped contribute to Lumination during their time here at Lipscomb. Whether that was through radio, TV newscast or our online website (or maybe all three!), we have appreciated all the work they’ve poured into this network, as they were an integral part in producing content for Lumination They will be missed by the journalism and new media department, but communication staff and students alike trust that they will be successful as they pursue their careers. Carly Reams 1. What professor has shaped you the most here? In what way? For sure Alan Griggs. He reminds me of such a father figure in the way he really pushes us hard while also truly believing in our talent. Without him, I would not be the journalist I am today! His honest advice has meant so much to me and my time here at Lipscomb. 2. What is your favorite Lipscomb memory? Ah, definitely the Lipscomb vs. Liberty game! I know we lost, but it was so cool seeing Lipscomb come together like that. I love our sports, and all the big games have been my favorite part of college. 3. Is there a favorite article that you’ve written for Lumination during your time here? I can’t pick one, but my feature stories have been a big part of what I love about writing. I think people are the most interesting and important thing to readers, and I feel the same as a writer. Getting to hear so many amazing stories from students has been such a blessing. 4. What are your...
Autism awareness month: exploring what autism is really like

Autism awareness month: exploring what autism is really like

April is known for springtime, rain and Easter. It’s also known as Autism Awareness month, a time to come together and raise awareness for autism. The IDEAL (Igniting the Dream of Education and Access at Lipscomb) Program was founded by Misty Parsley in 2014. It strives to help students with special needs at Lipscomb get the most out of their college experience, including those with autism. Parsley was an autism consultant in her previous line of work, and she has been working with students with autism for most of her career. She now works as the director of special education programs and as a faculty advisor for IDEAL. Parsley said the program strives to individualize how they help students with their needs, everything from their schedule, to finding ways to motivate them to get their work done. “When working with those with autism, you have to somewhat learn as you go,” Parsley said. “You have to be willing to make changes and implement strategies as issues arise and be willing to meet the students where they are. We really just individualize based on their interests, their needs, what’s worked in the past and what we can implement here at Lipscomb.” One student with autism in the program, Cooper Everitt, said the IDEAL program has benefited him, and he enjoys being a part of it. “Lipscomb is a very nice school, and I love doing the IDEAL program,” Everitt said. “It helps me become a better person, to be more flexible and more responsible.” Parsley noted that autism is a constant struggle with social situations and sensory input, and those...
Lipscomb Global Learning students reflect on Notre Dame burning

Lipscomb Global Learning students reflect on Notre Dame burning

The famous Notre Dame Cathedral, home of Paris Archbishop Michel Aupetit, went up in flames on Monday. Residents and tourists watched in horror as their beloved and treasured monument burned. Several Lipscomb students, especially those who studied abroad in past years, have expressed their sorrow on social media. Veronika Jones, a junior who studied abroad in Florence in spring of 2018 saw the cathedral when she was abroad. “It was clear how proud the people of Paris were of the beauty and the history of the city,” Jones said. “I can’t even begin to imagine how this loss is impacting them.” Jones noted how busy the cathedral was, and how everyone visiting was in awe of the building. “I wish I could’ve gone inside while I was there,” she said. “I am happy I at least got to see it though.” Brianna Burch, who is also a junior, studied abroad in London in Fall of 2018. Burch is studying French at Lipscomb, and she said visiting the historic and sacred monument was awe-inspiring and humbling. “I didn’t know any French before coming to Lipscomb, but since then I’ve embraced French culture on a personal level,” Burch said. “So this tragedy was devastating to see. “Mon cœur se brise—my heart breaks for Paris.” The fire reported to have started in the scaffolding surrounding the spire. The cathedral had been undergoing renovations recently, particularly around the spire in general. The fire quickly got out of control, and soon after the roof and iconic spire collapsed. The inner woodwork of Notre Dame also suffered and will most likely not be recovered. Fortunately,...
STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Lipscomb’s accidental author, Tumi Mfoloe

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Lipscomb’s accidental author, Tumi Mfoloe

Tumi Mfoloe, a junior animation student at Lipscomb, accidentally stumbled upon her passion early last year when she was able to self-publish her first novel. In January of 2018, Mfoloe self-published her book, The Meeting, on Amazon under the pen name Tumi Yukii. Soon after, it became available for purchase at Barnes and Noble. She first developed the idea for the book while reading stories on a site called Wattpad, a place where aspiring writers can share their works for free. She claimed that many of the stories that she read all sounded the same, so she took it upon herself to write something different, not really expecting it to go anywhere. Her story features two musicians from New York, Tumi and John, who meet each other on a night out. Unlike other romantic novels Mfoloe had read, this couple has a different type of relationship from that of what is normally seen in media these days. It shows the story of a Christian couple that focuses on the importance of communication in a relationship, along with the decision to save its first kiss as a couple for marriage. “What I love about Tumi and John and everyone else in the book is that they will sit and have a conversation—they’re open to communication,” Mfoloe said. Mfoloe received incredibly positive feedback from her story after it was posted online, as her story was read over 200,000 times. Because of this, she decided to rewrite it and publish it into a novel. “If these people online have liked my book and have said all these great things about it, then probably...
Margot Lee Shetterly discusses her book Hidden Figures at annual Landiss Lecture

Margot Lee Shetterly discusses her book Hidden Figures at annual Landiss Lecture

Hidden Figures is a story about breaking the mould — about progress and about bravery. It’s a story that has been hidden for years but now has been heard by millions. This past Tuesday, the Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering partnered with the English Department’s annual Landiss Lecture Series to bring in author Margot Lee Shetterly to talk about her book, Hidden Figures, in honor of Black History Month. Hidden Figures has been named the 2018-19 Nashville Reads book by the Nashville mayor’s office and the Nashville Public Library Foundation, as well as the Common Read by Lipscomb University’s LIGHT program. Hidden Figures is a story about three women, Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson and Katherine Johnson (formerly known as Katherine Goble), and the work they contributed during the Space Race to launch astronaut John Glenn into space. Shetterly’s father spent his career at NASA Langley in Hampton, Virginia, where Shetterly grew up and where the story takes place. Her father worked with many of the women that she wrote about in Hidden Figures, including Johnson and Jackson. In her lecture, she discussed the how the public, along with the publishers and producers who helped share her story, have received Hidden Figures, and how it became more than anyone could have envisioned. The shocking response started fairly early in the works, as a film producer contacted her about turning the book, which was simply a proposal at this stage, into a movie. “The response to this story has been beyond anything I could have imagined, that the publishers imagined, that the movie people imagined, that NASA imagined, and most certainly, that the women at the core of this...