Coronvirus sends Global Learning students home early

Coronvirus sends Global Learning students home early

As the novel COVID -19 continues to spread across the globe, more and more people continue to feel the effects of it, including Lipscomb’s global learning students. Students studying in Florence were moved to Vienna back on February 28th as a precautionary measure since Italy was one of the places under high watch by the CDC. “None of us suspected it to take this huge of a turn for the worst,” said Lipscomb Sophomore Nina Santiago who was studying abroad in Florence. On Friday, students who were studying abroad in Vienna flew back home to the states, their trip being cut nearly in half. President Randy Lowry sent an email to the students abroad and their families that said the following. “This has been a very eventful semester and we are so proud of all of our students for their resiliency and grace in handling all of the changes and uncertainty we have faced over the last few weeks due to the outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19). As you know, the Lipscomb leadership team has been monitoring the COVID-19 situation in Europe on a daily basis. Whether our students are studying on our campus or in locations thousands of miles away from Nashville, our goal of keeping our students safe and secure remains a primary focus.” The students. were taken back by the message but not too surprised. “When we all got the message, we all gasped and started to get really emotional. It’s definitely devastating, but I’m not surprised. I figured it’d probably be coming soon with everything going on, I just didn’t expect it now,” says Rachel...
Roger Wiemers receives the 2020 Mary Morris Award

Roger Wiemers receives the 2020 Mary Morris Award

Roger Wiemers, professor with the college of education, is this year’s recipient of the Mary Morris Award. In memoriam to Mary Morris, this award is given each year to a member of the Lipscomb community who has demonstrated a dedication to service in the community. The service and reception for the award took place on March 12. Morris, also a teacher in the college of education, passed away in 2005. “To meet the Morrises was fantastic, and to know that it came from their daughter who had been a teacher herself as well,” Wiemers said. “And to meet some of the past recipients — it was amazing.” During the ceremony, Wiemers quoted Mother Teresa from a 1979 interview with Johnny Carson on “The Tonight Show” when she won the Nobel Peace Prize: “Do you remember when Jesus came in Jerusalem and he was riding on the donkey and everything?” she asked. “Do you think, Mr. Carson, for one moment, that the little donkey thought that the crowd was giving him the praise and glory instead of Jesus? I feel like Mother Teresa: I am that donkey. And Jesus should get the praise.” Wiemers first traveled to India in 1984 and was then called to Papua New Guinea from 1989-1991. After he traveled back home, he learned that a group of Lipscomb students was located in Prague, Czechoslovakia, so he traveled with them from 1992-1994. In 2007, Wiemers was deeply moved to begin a work in India called the Tamar Ministry in Mumbai with his friend P.D. Prasada Roa. He said that he read an article mentioning that over 200,000...
Disney and Pixar’s newest film, Onward, holds a magic-filled-tale that takes the viewer on a journey full of laughs, growth, and forgiveness

Disney and Pixar’s newest film, Onward, holds a magic-filled-tale that takes the viewer on a journey full of laughs, growth, and forgiveness

Onward features a family of elves with who lost their father before their youngest son was born. Ian Lightfoot, voiced by Tom Holland, and older brother Barley, voiced by Chris Pratt, are two brothers who could not be more different. Single mom Laurel, voiced by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, has done her best to raise them in little New Mushroomtown. This is a world full of mythical creatures that have found a content life living without their gifts from nature. Magic has long been forgotten in favor of a more efficient and easier solution: Technology. The film begins on Ian’s 16th birthday, when the viewer sees him living a life with which he’s not quite satisfied. His shy tendencies, and not to mention his embarrassing older brother, make it hard for him to feel accepted and comfortable at school. Laurel reveals that their father had left behind a gift for the two sons, only to be given to them once they were both older than 16: A wizard’s staff, an enchanted stone and a spell to bring back their beloved dad for one whole day. Ian turns out to have a natural talent at casting spells, and is able to bring back their father. Well, the lower half of him. With the enchanted stone destroyed, the boys must embark on a quest to find another stone in order to bring back the entirety father before time runs out. Barley, who has a passion for table-top magic games, Ian with the wizard’s staff, and the hilarious pair of legs that is their father head out on their journey in order to be...
MLK Day of Service unites students across Nashvile

MLK Day of Service unites students across Nashvile

On Saturday, January 18th, over 600 students from Nashville colleges and universities gathered together to attend service projects in the name of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Students from not only Lipscomb, but Belmont University, Fisk University, Nashville State Community College, Tennessee State University, Meharry Medical College, Trevecca Nazarene University, and Vanderbilt University were divided up and sent all over Nashville to counter at different service sites. Taylor Morrow, a senior at Lipscomb, enjoyed having people from different universities come together to be able to serve. “A lot of people are willing to come out and serve, people from all different backgrounds. It was cool to get everyone from different schools altogether,” says Morrow. This year’s theme for the MLK Joint Day of Service was “Sit-Ins @ 60: Students. Action. Justice,” as a commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Nashville lunch counter sit-ins and those who rallied against racial injustice. These sit-ins, which lasted about three months in the 1960s, occurred at different lunch counters and were a part of a nonviolent campaign to end segregation in Nashville. These sit-ins consisted of primarily African American college students, who were often attacked both verbally and physically during their campaigns. The event kicked off at TSU, where students had a chance to choose which service project they wanted to attend. Those who volunteered had nearly 25 different service opportunities to choose from — including Second Harvest Food Bank, Project Transformation, Feed the Children, and many more. Students were also given the opportunity to attend an interview with Nashville Sit-Ins Leader Dr. Rip Patton before being sent off to their respective...
Shortage of supplies at Starbucks

Shortage of supplies at Starbucks

As many students have noticed over the past week, Starbucks has had a shortage of their goods and supplies, including flavors, cup sizes and more. This has not only caused frustration with students but also with staff and management at Starbucks. Many students were impacted by this shortage, and several questioned why this was happening. “It’s so frustrating!” exclaims Katrina Hughes, a frequent customer at the University’s Starbucks. “I’ve started going to ABP to get my coffee in the morning just because it’s cheaper, and they actually have things.” The General Manager and Operations Manager of Food Services, Wolcott Fary and Anthony Bates, explain the situation, and why the shortage occurred. “It’s all about supply chain,” says Fary. Starbucks was due to have a delivery last week but didn’t receive anything until this past Tuesday, the 10th. This caused management to scramble for solutions, including borrowing from other local Starbucks companies, as well as utilizing the other food services on campus. However, this was only a temporary solution. In the meantime, management wants to compensate for students who were affected by this shortage. Bates, along with other management, have decided to print out vouchers for the students who were affected by the crisis, and is allowing Starbucks to hand them out to those they recognize as were affected. They note that service recovery is vital to them, and want to acknowledge the students’ frustration. “We try to do things that really do show that we’re partners…our job on campus is to take care of the students; that’s the only reason we’re here,” Fary says. Fary and Bates also acknowledged...