STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Lipscomb’s accidental author, Tumi Mfoloe

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Lipscomb’s accidental author, Tumi Mfoloe

Tumi Mfoloe, a junior animation student at Lipscomb, accidentally stumbled upon her passion early last year when she was able to self-publish her first novel. In January of 2018, Mfoloe self-published her book, The Meeting, on Amazon under the pen name Tumi Yukii. Soon after, it became available for purchase at Barnes and Noble. She first developed the idea for the book while reading stories on a site called Wattpad, a place where aspiring writers can share their works for free. She claimed that many of the stories that she read all sounded the same, so she took it upon herself to write something different, not really expecting it to go anywhere. Her story features two musicians from New York, Tumi and John, who meet each other on a night out. Unlike other romantic novels Mfoloe had read, this couple has a different type of relationship from that of what is normally seen in media these days. It shows the story of a Christian couple that focuses on the importance of communication in a relationship, along with the decision to save its first kiss as a couple for marriage. “What I love about Tumi and John and everyone else in the book is that they will sit and have a conversation—they’re open to communication,” Mfoloe said. Mfoloe received incredibly positive feedback from her story after it was posted online, as her story was read over 200,000 times. Because of this, she decided to rewrite it and publish it into a novel. “If these people online have liked my book and have said all these great things about it, then probably...
Margot Lee Shetterly discusses her book Hidden Figures at annual Landiss Lecture

Margot Lee Shetterly discusses her book Hidden Figures at annual Landiss Lecture

Hidden Figures is a story about breaking the mould — about progress and about bravery. It’s a story that has been hidden for years but now has been heard by millions. This past Tuesday, the Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering partnered with the English Department’s annual Landiss Lecture Series to bring in author Margot Lee Shetterly to talk about her book, Hidden Figures, in honor of Black History Month. Hidden Figures has been named the 2018-19 Nashville Reads book by the Nashville mayor’s office and the Nashville Public Library Foundation, as well as the Common Read by Lipscomb University’s LIGHT program. Hidden Figures is a story about three women, Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson and Katherine Johnson (formerly known as Katherine Goble), and the work they contributed during the Space Race to launch astronaut John Glenn into space. Shetterly’s father spent his career at NASA Langley in Hampton, Virginia, where Shetterly grew up and where the story takes place. Her father worked with many of the women that she wrote about in Hidden Figures, including Johnson and Jackson. In her lecture, she discussed the how the public, along with the publishers and producers who helped share her story, have received Hidden Figures, and how it became more than anyone could have envisioned. The shocking response started fairly early in the works, as a film producer contacted her about turning the book, which was simply a proposal at this stage, into a movie. “The response to this story has been beyond anything I could have imagined, that the publishers imagined, that the movie people imagined, that NASA imagined, and most certainly, that the women at the core of this...
Honors College finds new home

Honors College finds new home

The Honors College has officially moved on from the basement of Elam and into a new home. A house on campus that was once used as a place for storage has been redone as a relaxing study environment for Lipscomb’s honor students. Director Paul Prill said the Honors program has been in need of more space as more students joined, as it currently has 600 students enrolled. “We finally got a space where we can do things, so now we’re going to try and actually do some of those things,” Prill said. Prill added that he wanted this to be a space for honors students to come and study or hang out. There are plenty of rooms, both upstairs and downstairs, where students can relax or study for their upcoming exam. Prill also said he hopes to hold get-togethers for honors students and possibly sponsor certain events, giving students within the department an opportunity to get to know each other better. “I’m hoping that if we can have some activities here, then people will start to meet other people in different classes,” Prill said. He also noted that the freshman Lipscomb Experience classes will be meeting in the new building, so that freshman will know that the house is available to them. Prill said he hopes this will encourage them to come back throughout their time at Lipscomb. “Students will see this as their space from day one,” Prill said. To help the space feel more like their own, Prill said the Honors College has tried to be intentional about bringing in student-made art — and not just from...
Netflix stirs up controversy with Bird Box viewership stats

Netflix stirs up controversy with Bird Box viewership stats

Netflix decided to remove the blindfold on its viewers by revealing statistics on its well-known Bird Box film. In December 2018, the company announced that Bird Box garnered over 45 million account views within the first seven days of its release, setting a new company record. This was a strange sight from Netflix, as the company normally keeps its viewership statistics private. Many have questioned why the company decided to reveal the number, and if it may have been skewed in some way. According to Netflix, an account has to watch at least 70 percent of the running time before it counts as a view. This means that 45 million accounts have watched most of Bird Box.  This revelation might not be as troubling if Netflix hadn’t had issues with statistics in the past. In 2017, the company was accused of falsifying some of its ratings. The ratings seen by each viewer varies based on individual viewing habits, and Netflix only allowed people to see the ratings from other viewers with similar habits instead of seeing ratings from everyone who had reviewed the film. Netflix is not required to reveal their data to the public. In some cases, doing so could damage the company and restrict its negotiation power with other media companies when acquiring licensing rights. However, some Lipscomb students are buying that the numbers are accurate, despite the company’s lack of transparency. “It makes sense that movies on Netflix would do better than movies in a theater,” junior Brianna Burch said. “As a college student, I can’t always afford to go to theaters to watch a movie. But I have...
‘Glass’ will shatter your mind, and possibly your expectations

‘Glass’ will shatter your mind, and possibly your expectations

Glass is a movie full of thrill and shocking twists and turns, but does it live up to the hype? Many people have been anticipating this sequel to Unbreakable (2000) and Split (2017). Director M. Night Shyamalan, who also served as a writer for Glass, has been working on this film for almost two decades — 19 years to be exact. In this movie, we see the return of the hero and villain of Unbreakable, David Dunn (Bruce Willis) and Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson), who also goes by Mr. Glass. The overpowered hero and the brilliant mastermind meet Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy), who suffers from DID, and whom the audience was introduced to in Split. These three men are held in a psychiatric ward for their supernatural abilities, where psychiatrist Dr. Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson) attempts to convince them that their “abilities” can be explained scientifically. She has each of them recall the first moments they felt like they were different than others, and explains how each of their miraculous feats were simply in their heads. The beginning of the movie starts out very slow, with odd pacing and a hard-to-follow storyline. The viewer is thrown into the movie and, unless the audience knows the storyline of the previous two films, it can be a bit confusing to watch. There are also several points with some very strange cinematography choices, as well as some plot holes that are difficult to look past. Towards the end of the movie, however, are when things get interesting. The story picks up, and the audience can’t help but sit on the edge...