Lipscomb Health Services offers Coronavirus Prevention Tips

Lipscomb Health Services offers Coronavirus Prevention Tips

Director of Health Services at Lipscomb, Erin Keckley’s first advice is, “There is no reason to panic”. In December of 2019, the coronavirus, which is a group of viruses, was discovered when it was transmitted going from animal to animal and then human to human. This is a new virus, having no one previously been exposed to it, nobody is immune to COVID-19 This virus can cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. “The group we need to be the most careful with are the elderly, over the age of 60 years, and those with chronic diseases especially those with compromised immune systems,” said Keckley. “This virus is spread by respiratory droplets,” said Keckley, “So when you cough or sneeze, these droplets float in the air and then eventually land on a surface. Keckley explains important information about when you can get tested for this virus. “It is important to know that there is no vaccine, no specific medication, or point of care testing. For you to be tested for the coronavirus, you have to meet certain criteria. Fever, cough, shortness of breath, cold symptoms, and you have to have been either in contact with someone who has had a laboratory-confirmed case or you have traveled in the past 14 days to one of the areas with a contagious level of two or three,” said Keckley. So far there are only five countries labeled either a level two or three. China, Italy, Iran and South Korea are labeled level three and Japan is the only at level two right now. Keckley wants everyone to be...
Lipscomb students come together to help feed Nashville’s hungry

Lipscomb students come together to help feed Nashville’s hungry

On Thursday evenings, Lipscomb students come together with other volunteers to participate in Feeding the Hungry located at St. John’s United Methodist Church. This event is held weekly and provides a hot meal to anyone in the community who might be in need. “We do the food pantry and the clothes closet,” said Sandra Griggs, St. John’s United Methodist Church pastor and wife of Alan Griggs, associate professor of communication and journalism. Students portion salads, wash dishes, serve the food, clean the tables and do anything they can to help the other service members. St. John’s is open from 3 to 5:30 p.m. on Thursday of each week, and anyone from the community is welcome to come to the clothes closet and get a free meal. Around 7 p.m. is when the volunteers begin cleaning up. Both the food pantry and clothes closet are supplied by a variety of donors. “Deodorant, soap, clothes or leftover food. This stuff is all donated,” said Sandra Griggs. St. John’s Methodist Church has been feeding the community every week for close to 20 years and has plans to continue. “We have all sorts of people come to serve. We have newcomers, church members, and people from all different churches,” she said. “We would love any help we can get for these events. We have high school students that need to do community service, college students, and people from the community. Teenagers can come as long as they have a parent with them.” As a part of Lipscomb’s emphasis on service-learning, students from the University have become regular helpers at St. John’s. “We have...
Her Voice: Selections from the Cheekwood Collections

Her Voice: Selections from the Cheekwood Collections

“Her Voice: Selections from the Cheekwood Collections” is honoring the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in the United States and the 60th anniversary of Cheekwood as a public institution. The exhibit is on display through March 30 in the John C. Hutcheson Gallery in the Beaman Library. These pieces, on loan for the Lipscomb display at Hutcheson Gallery, were donated to Cheekwood over the course of its history. Cheekwood, 1200 Forrest Park Drive in Nashville’s exclusive Belle Meade enclave, is a 55-acre botanical garden and art museum on the historic Cheek estate. “Originally built as the home of Leslie and Mabel Cheek in 1929, Cheekwood is one of the finest examples of an American Country Place Era estate,” according to its web page. “Since being converted into a museum of art and botanical garden in 1960, Cheekwood has presented world-class art exhibitions, spectacular gardens and an historic estate unlike anything else.”  This exhibition at Lipscomb highlights Cheekwood’s long-standing legacy of collecting works by female artists. It displays the voices, creative innovations, and the voices of remarkable women. The gallery includes work by Ida Rittenberg Kohlmeyer, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jane Peterson, Liliane Lijn, Grace Hill Turnbull, Helen Frankenthaler, Dorothy O’Connor, Marilyn Murphy, Betty Woodman, Perle Fine, Louise Dahl-Wolfe and more. Only four of these artists — Lijn, Murphy, O’Connor and Marylyn Ditenfass  — are living, according to  Mia Jaye Thomas, the gallery assistant for the John C. Hutcheson gallery and the administrative assistant for the School of Art and Design. The exhibit was curated by Campbell Mobley, Cheekwood’s curator of exhibitions. It is being staged in conjunction with the 100th anniversary...
Devastating Australian wildfires have an impact on Lipscomb’s campus

Devastating Australian wildfires have an impact on Lipscomb’s campus

A Lipscomb student from Australia said he feels helpless as wildfires that began in July continue to ravage his homeland. “The fires affected me emotionally more than physically, obviously due to being halfway around the world,” said Scott McKenzie, from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The corporate management major with a marketing concentration said he wishes he was home, where he could perhaps do something about the catastrophe. “I felt helpless being in the US and did not know what to do besides try to raise awareness as much as possible. If I were home, I would have been out there doing everything I can to help those risking their lives for the beautiful country of Australia.” CNN News has reported at least 28 people have died nationwide, and in the state of New South Wales alone, more than 3,000 homes have been destroyed or damaged. State and federal authorities are struggling to contain the massive flames, even with firefighting assistance from other countries, including the United States. A Lipscomb environmental sustainability student said there is a need to focus on the human impact on the environment. “People choose to look anywhere but our own impact on the environment,” said Cecelie Eiler, from Freeport, Illinois. “This wildfire is the biggest thing we can hold on to and show people that this is a problem,” said Eiler, who is vice president of Share Our Supper. “We can splash data and numbers in people’s faces all day long but unless you’re a data-driven person you’re not going to connect with that. To make a change people need to visualize the impacts they are...
Campus security prepares for holiday boost in Green Hills-area crime

Campus security prepares for holiday boost in Green Hills-area crime

Just in the past week, there have been ten thefts and two burglaries reported in the Green Hills area. Lipscomb security has stepped up for the holidays knowing the crime rate increases around this time of year. “This has been a pretty good semester for us. We are off to a pretty good start. We want to finish up strong, of course, but so far we have been blessed,” said Lipscomb Security Lt.  Patrick Cameron. There were five burglaries and two motor vehicle theft reports on Lipscomb’s campus within the entire 2018 year, according to the 2019 annual crime report. This has been an increasing number from the years prior but, campus security has done everything they can to secure the campus. “We have tried to, if possible, take lunch or dinner breaks inside the vehicles so we are still out and to have those extra eyes and just to remind everyone that it is that time of year where we do see an uptick in incidents,” said Cameron. “The campus crime rate has not increased but the surrounding areas have. We continue to see, through the weekly reports from Metro, that it’s all around us,” said Cameron. According to Neighborhood Scout, with a crime rate of 52 per one thousand residents, Nashville has one of the highest crime rates in America compared to all communities of all sizes. From the smallest towns to the very largest cities. One’s chance of becoming a victim of either violent or property crime here is one in 19. “We have a good bit of campus secured with cameras and this allows us...