Pro-rated refunds to be issued for room and board after COVID-19 emergency closes campus

Pro-rated refunds to be issued for room and board after COVID-19 emergency closes campus

Lipscomb University will be refunding, via credit or refund, spring semester room-and-board fees on-campus residents and their parents already had paid before the COVID-19 outbreak forced the campus to close, according to President Randy Lowry.   Those same students — who had left their belongings in their dorm rooms before leaving for the extended spring break that turned into the full closure of the campus for the semester — also will be able to reunite with their belongings.  Lowry detailed these solutions Thursday in a live video with the Lipscomb Community.  “We think already, it cost a school like Lipscomb, 5… 6… 8… $10 million, and that’s before we even get into next fall,” said Lowry of the losses due to the COVID shutdown.  About 1,500 people were planning to return to campus living for the rest of the semester at the time the university instructed students that, because of the pandemic, they were not to come back this spring.  As of Sunday, April 5, there 327,253 cases and 9,302 deaths associated with COVID-19 across the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  There are 3,321 confirmed cases and 43 deaths in Tennessee, according to those CDC numbers. While Lipscomb classes have transitioned to on-line learning this spring and for the summer, there are an awful lot of empty beds and dorm rooms on the Green Hills campus. 2020-2021 undergraduate room and board costs are listed on Lipscomb’s website at $13,380 a year, $6,690 a semester. Lowry knows students and parents are concerned about the money they spent on the room and board they are...
End of school year will be one unlike any Lipscomb has ever experienced

End of school year will be one unlike any Lipscomb has ever experienced

Thanks to concerns over the coronavirus, the week after spring break this year will be one unlike any Lipscomb has ever experienced. The university announced the following for the week of March 23-27: Undergraduate students will have an extended week of spring break. Graduate classes will resume; programs will determine the format. Faculty will report to campus to transition classes to a remote teaching and learning environment. In a presentation to faculty and staff on Thursday, President Randy Lowry said that “‘closing’ is not a very good word for this.” “We are open and will at some level stay open because we have certain kinds of needs we need to meet for our students,” Lowry said. “We’ll be here working that week [of March 23] so that on Monday the 30th of March, we can reinstitute the educational piece to our students wherever in the country we might be,” he said. “And we will be prepared at that time to extend that as long as we need to. We have to be prepared for a longer-term engagement with students in some kind of effective way.”  President Lowry expressed his safety concerns of both the faculty and staff, wondering what the right decision for the Lipscomb community would be.  “Is a student better off at home or is a student better off here?” Lowry asked. The university had concerns about students all having a home to return to, he said, if it called for a delay of classes.  “Something as simple as where should they be becomes really complex when you try to work down at a level that’s sensitive...
Lipscomb Full Moon Festival raises $1,315 for YES Mission

Lipscomb Full Moon Festival raises $1,315 for YES Mission

Lipscomb clubs, Delta Omega and Theta Psi host the Full Moon Festival each spring semester to raise money for a different mission. This year the clubs raised $1,315 for “The Mission of Youth Encouragement Services (YES).” The mission of yes is to “enrich the lives of children in Inner City Nashville, helping them to develop academically, physically, spiritually and socially.” The event functions as a philanthropy event but also united the student body through music. Throughout the evening, from 6 pm till 9 pm, students perform high-end karaoke with a live band and singing songs they have rehearsed. There is dancing, fun, and music all geared around a 50’s theme. The event is essentially a sock-hop playing current music mixed with old hits.   Riley Hoag captured a gallery of the event here. ...
Liberty Flames scorch Bisons’ post-season hopes in title game

Liberty Flames scorch Bisons’ post-season hopes in title game

The Bisons’  hopes for an ASUN title and return to post-season glory faded Sunday afternoon when they fell to the Liberty University Flames, 73-57, at the Vines Center in Lynchburg, Virginia. The Liberty Flames (30-4) will go on to the NCAA tournament. The Bisons finish with a 16-16 record after a strong comeback in the second half of the season. Thriller carried Bisons to the championship game: With 3.1 seconds left on the clock Thursday night in Jacksonville, the Bisons earned a 73-71 win over North Florida courtesy of a floater from senior guard Andrew Fleming.  Sophomore center Ahsan Asadullah, who had scored a career-high 40 points Tuesday night in the quarterfinal win over Florida Gulf Coast, led all players Thursday with 27 points and 19 rebounds. With eight seconds remaining and the score tied, senior guard Michael Buckland got the ball to Asadullah, who soon found himself triple-teamed. Asadullah fed the ball to Fleming in the lane, and Fleming tossed in a teardrop for the game-winner. “Ahsan flicked it to me,” said Fleming. “I actually didn’t know he was passing it to me. I’m just happy it went in ’cause that kid [6-7 forward Wajid Aminu) had been blocking my shot a ton, so I’m just happy it went in.” Fleming finished with 26 points, a career-high. Lipscomb led by as many as 10 points, coming off of a strong first half, but the Ospreys saw the momentum swing in their favor to take the lead with five minutes left in the game. The Bisons were able to even the scoring and stop two North Florida shots with less...
Tornado outbreak in Nashville area claims more than 20 lives; Students moved to safety

Tornado outbreak in Nashville area claims more than 20 lives; Students moved to safety

A deadly tornado roared through Middle Tennessee in the early hours Tuesday, leveling homes, businesses and schools and leaving around 50,000 households and businesses without power.  The danger caused Lipscomb to take precautions for students. After the National Weather Service announced the tornado warning for Davidson County around 12:35 a.m., Lipscomb residents were evacuated from their dorms to safe locations on campus. “I started hearing the weather alert on my phone, and then maybe 10 minutes later they said for Johnson Hall to go down to the basement,” said Lipscomb senior Kate Holt. “They [the RAs] were very calm about it.” AP News is reporting at least 22 deaths in Tennessee due to the EF-3 tornado, which had winds measured around 160 mph. The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency on Tuesday declared a level-three state of emergency for Tennessee. President Donald Trump is scheduled to visit Tennessee on Friday. Vice President of Student Life Al Sturgeon emailed Lipscomb students early Tuesday. “Our hearts are with everyone affected by last night’s storms in our Nashville community,” Sturgeon wrote. “Our Security & Safety and Housing & Residence Life departments were up all night keeping watch over campus while several of us monitored the storm.” The lack of sleep after the students were evacuated to safer locales worried Holt.  “This [the storm] could affect someone who has midterms, class, or even an internship they have to perform well in,” Holt said. But the students’ safety came first, considering the widespread violence of the deadly storm. “We have already received reports from employees who have been impacted by the severe weather,” said Vice President of...