Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

Techno-thriller ‘Nerve’ will keep you on edge of seat

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

X’s and O’s from a rookie quarterback coach: being coachable

Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Talbert represents Bisons final time at 2016 Olympic Trials

Professor traveling in France offers perspective on Nice attack, advice to study-abroad students

Professor traveling in France offers perspective on Nice attack, advice to study-abroad students

‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

‘Ghostbusters’ blasts through backlash with remake better than original

NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR

NCAA recognizes Lipscomb Athletics for high APR


‘The BFG’ is soporific family-friendly fantasy

‘The BFG’ is soporific family-friendly fantasy

Although it wasn’t quite “grizzling or horrigust,” The BFG just might be categorized as a “grunicous” (as BFG would say) film to sit through for anyone who’s graduated from elementary school. Moviegoers can’t help but to expect an E.T.-like film upon hearing Steven Spielberg was directing another story about a child developing a friendship with a fantastical being, but The BFG (The Big-Friendly Giant) falls short of the storytelling magic E.T. possesses that we’ve come to expect from Spielberg. The film focuses on Sophie, an orphan, who is snatched by a giant from her bed. The tale continues with an unlikely, yet lovable friendship between Sophie and the giant, whom she dubs “BFG.” BFG isn’t the only giant in the world, though; there are several other giants, who have terrifying names, “Bloodbottler” and “Maidmasher,” for example, who eat children such as Sophie. The rest of the story tells Sophie’s and BFG’s quest to end the terror the other giants inflict upon “human beans,” and even BFG himself. BFG is not entirely without merit. The budding young star, Ruby Barnhill, delivers an admirable performance as Sophie, the orphan who travels to Giant Country. Mark Rylance also provides a wonderful voice performance as the title character. The CGI in the film is striking as well; however, this year’s The Jungle Book’s imagery is much more so. With today’s CGI possibilities, it seems that the scenery could have so much more depth  — “Giant Country” is dull and lacking compared to the intricate and detailed jungle in The Jungle Book. Despite Barnhill and Rylance’s performances, older filmgoers may begin to suffer from boredom...
‘Finding Dory’ is a great catch

‘Finding Dory’ is a great catch

Many wondered if “Finding Dory” would sink or swim, but in typical Pixar-fashion, the animated comedy gets along swimmingly. Ellen Degeneres’ Dory, one of Disney’s most beloved characters, returns to the screen for her own feature film, providing lots of laughs and delighted squeals — from children, college-aged students who grew up with “Nemo” and adults alike — along the way and teaching some valuable lessons about family and focusing on one’s strengths. Among many good qualities, one of the film’s greatest strengths lies in its voice actors, brilliantly voiced by Degeneres (Dory), Albert Brooks (Marlin), Ed O’Neill (Hank), Ty Burrell (Bailey), Diane Keaton (Jenny), Eugene Levy (Charlie) and newcomer Hayden Rolence (Nemo). For moviegoers who are familiar with Pixar’s 2003 hit, “Finding Nemo,” Dory’s “short-term memory loss” ‘disability’ has often landed her in trouble. For example, she, on occasion, wanders off, then forgets where she has wandered off to — causing much despair for the fish who try to keep an eye on her. She forgets that Marlin has told her she’s not supposed to go on the class trip (making it a very awkward situation for Marlin to tell her in front of the class). She can’t even remember when she’s already told Marlin something in the night, so she repeatedly keeps waking Marlin up to tell him. For a moment, she even forgets why she and Marlin trekked across the ocean a few months ago (it was to find Nemo). It would seem Dory can’t remember much of anything important. One day, though, Dory does remember something important — something very important. She has a family. Somewhere out in the...
‘Central Intelligence’ has a lot of Hart 

‘Central Intelligence’ has a lot of Hart 

Kevin Hart and Dwayne Johnson have found a spark in the buddy cop movie genre, and it’s grounded in one theme: being there for others. Calvin Joyner (Kevin Hart) is the All-American high school athlete. He’s the popular kid on the block voted most likely to succeed his senior year. Bob Stone (Dwayne Johnson) is the complete opposite. He’s overweight, mocked, bullied and, as victim of the senior prank, is literally the “butt” of all the jokes. 20 years later, Calvin is seen dealing with issues that many adults deal with. Life has settled in, and he doesn’t see the positives. His life hasn’t gone in the direction he might have imagined back in high school. He was meant for greatness, but, now, he is the accountant for a firm with an inflatable monkey out front. Calvin’s wife, Maggie (Danielle Nicolet), was his high school sweetheart and is considering going to couples counseling to fix their marriage. He almost resents his high school past because he didn’t meet expectations. Bob is quite different. He has lost over 200 pounds thanks to “working out every day for six hours the past 20 years.” Oh, and surprise, he is in the CIA. However, even with his accomplishments, Bob is still dealing with the bullying he endured in high school. Even after 20 years when Bob is faced with his high school bully, he is quiet. The trained assassin only sees his high school past in the mirror. He doesn’t understand who he is. So he seeks out the help of his only friend, Calvin, to help him. Calvin simply gave Bob his...
‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ exemplifies theme of justice

‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ exemplifies theme of justice

The epitome of a story fueled by justice, the classic American novel To Kill A Mockingbird transformed into a play and opened Wednesday night in Shamblin Theater and ran through Sunday as part of the Christian Scholars Conference. Since the theme of the Christian Scholars Conference was justice, To Kill A Mockingbird was chosen because of its timeless commentary on justice. Professional actors portrayed most of the characters in the story, but Lipscomb student Shannon Clark played Mayella Ewell, the 19-year-old “white-trash” (as called in the story) female who accuses Jim Robinson, an innocent black man, of raping her. Mike Fernandez directed the play, and Bethany Rowland, also a Lipscomb student, was the assistant director. Tessa Bryant, the producer, said she has wanted to tell the story for a long time and was excited she now had the opportunity to do so. “True equality, true friendship, true empowerment requires day-to-day engagement,” Bryant said, adding that she hoped the show would inspire the audience — the “jury” — to make that commitment. The children in the play were skillfully portrayed by Hannah Trausht, starring as Scout, William Hearn as Jem and Charlie Webb as Dill. Chip Arnold starred as Atticus and Arnold’s real-life sister Nan Gurley played Maudie Atkinson. Arnold and Gurley’s father was a professor in the music and drama department for over 30 years at Lipscomb. In 1955, Arnold was in his first Lipscomb play as a boy. “One of the biggest joys I have is that I get to work with my sister again, and together we can honor our father’s legacy at Lipscomb,” Arnold said. This is the second time Arnold has played Atticus...
‘Tokens’ promotes theme of justice through music, skits, poetry and more

‘Tokens’ promotes theme of justice through music, skits, poetry and more

Featuring a theme on justice, the Christian Scholars Conference kicked off this week, showcasing a “Tokens” show: “A Change Is Gonna Come,” led by host (and Lipscomb theology and ethics professor) Lee Camp on Thursday night in Collins Alumni Auditorium. Camp created Tokens in 2008 to develop an environment in which he could infuse music, conversation, interviews and humor to successfully discuss academic questions in an inviting setting. The show has featured notable guests such as Vince Gill, Amy Grant and Ricky Skaggs, to name a few. The show Tuesday night spotlighted special guests Ashley Cleveland, Jenny & Tyler, Russell Moore, Linda Pastan, World Fiddle Ensemble, Jenny Littleton, Odessa Settles and The Most Outstanding Horeb Mountain Boys. Throughout the show, Camp said they will be “looking for tokens of a world characterized by a rightful justice.” Along with worthwhile lessons on justice, political jokes abounded and instrumental music filled the room throughout the night. Music varied from Woody Guthrie — as Camp said, “you can’t have a show on justice without a little Woody Guthrie” — to Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Sound of Silence.” Dr. Russell Moore, the president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, was there for the discussion part of the show. Moore told Camp he was wary of talking politics with him, especially presidential politics, to which Camp jokingly responded: “Oh, I don’t want to talk about anything presidential — just Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.” However, Camp mainly focused (seriously and satirically) the show on the conference’s theme of justice. “Probably can’t talk too much about justice without talking about marriage,” Camp joked. “According to...
Women’s basketball coach Greg Brown honors, remembers Pat Summitt

Women’s basketball coach Greg Brown honors, remembers Pat Summitt

The importance of building relationships with members of the team and staff is just one of the things Lipscomb women’s basketball coach Greg Brown learned during his years coaching on the staff of legendary coach Pat Summitt. Summitt, the long-time coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols and a pioneer in the world of women’s athletics died Tuesday after a battle with Alzheimer’s disease.  She was buried Thursday in a private ceremony in Clarksville, near where she grew up. From 2002-2004, Brown was the assistant coach for the Lady Vols while the legendary Summitt was head coach. Brown got his start in coaching college basketball at the University of Tennessee, thanks to Summitt. “I really appreciate her taking the chance on a young high school coach to join the staff,” Brown said. During the time they coached together, Brown and Summittdeveloped a close friendship, like many others Summitt came in contact with. Brown reflected on this, stating that building relationships with others is what Summitt was best at. It’s something that he took away from the years of coaching with her and employs with his own team at Lipscomb. Strengthening relationships with his players even off the court is something Brown said he strives to do. “At the most, you’re going to play 40 games together, but you’re going to be together off the court the whole year,” Brown noted. “I think the first thing that you’ve got to understand is you’ve got to develop relationships. Before they’re going to trust you on the floor, they’ve got to be able to trust that you’re there for them.” Not only does Brown have fond memories of coaching...
Baseball excels with off-season accolades 

Baseball excels with off-season accolades 

After another successful season, Bison baseball didn’t strike out when it comes to off-season accolades. Rising junior pitcher Brady Puckett was named a Louisville Slugger Third Team All-American by Collegiate Baseball on June 2, 2016. Puckett was also named Atlantic Sun Pitcher of the Year and first team all conference the week before. Puckett became the first non-freshman Bison to ever earn an All-America nod from Collegiate Baseball. “What a huge honor this is for him after having such an outstanding season,” Lipscomb Head Coach Jeff Forehand said. “We grow accustomed to what he does when he goes out on the mound, but for others to recognize him as one of the top pitchers in the country is pretty special.” Puckett was a force in the A-Sun as he tossed his way to a 9-2 record and a 2.93 ERA. In his 15 starts this season, Lipscomb was 13-2 and never lost a decision in eight games. Puckett was also one of 12 players that started summer ball nearly three weeks removed from the Atlantic Sun Tournament. They will compete in eight wooden bat leagues ranging from Massachusetts, Louisiana and Wisconsin. Sophomores Michael Gigliotti, Jeffrey Passantino and Pucket will join the top players in the country in the largest amateur baseball league in America since 1885. They are the first Lipscomb players to compete since Hunter Brothers in 2013. Brady Pucket wasn’t the only Bison to be singled out. Freshman Zeke Dodson was named to the Freshman All-American team by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association. Dodson was the only player from the Atlantic Sun to be honored by the NCBWA. Dodson played in...
Ostrom begins training for U.S. Collegiate National Volleyball Team

Ostrom begins training for U.S. Collegiate National Volleyball Team

Incoming senior volleyball player Kayla Ostrom begins training and competing this week for the 2016 U.S. Collegiate National Team – Indianapolis program June 21-30 in Indianapolis. In February, Ostrom attended the USAV Women’s National Team Open Tryout in Colorado Springs at the Olympic Training Center and made the team — one of only 36 women chosen. The program will be divided into three teams, each consisting of 12-players. Those teams, chosen during training, will compete in a round-robin tournament June 26-29 at the USA Volleyball Girl’s National Championships. It will serve as a second tryout for the USA National Team. This is the same tryout that Lipscomb volleyball alumni Jewell Dobson and Lauren Ford attended two years before. Ostrom was presented with the opportunity over winter break by head coach Brandon Rosenthal. “I was on the fence about going, but after talking with many people and praying for direction, I decided to go. I am so thankful I did,” Ostrom said.  Ostrom flew out to Denver for the tryout with Associate Head Coach Billy Ebel, who was working the tryout. After they landed, they hopped in a car and drove to Colorado Springs for the first session the same afternoon.  “Playing with girls from all over the country was way more fun than I expected. There was so much positive energy in the gym. Everyone brought their best effort,” Ostrom said. She said the drills were sometimes crazy; setting 6’5’’middles was a little tricky at first, but she said that, overall, competing in the drills was freeing and exhilarating.  She added that she approached the weekend with the mindset that she was going to have...
Talbert completes career with fastest non-qualifying time in NCAA history

Talbert completes career with fastest non-qualifying time in NCAA history

Since 2012, Madi Talbert has hit the ground running for the Lipscomb Bisons track and field club. On Wednesday, June 8, her historic career was finally completed in Eugene, Oregon, during the women’s 3,000 meter steeplechase at the NCAA Division I Outdoor National Championships. At this years championships, Talbert ran the fastest non-qualifying time of any runner in NCAA Division I Outdoor National Championships history. Her time of 10:07.10 placed her 13th out of 23 competitors — just one spot shy of qualifying. This was Talbert’s fourth consecutive trip to Eugene to compete for the Bisons in the final round in the 3,000m steeplechase, as she made it every year of her college career at Lipscomb. Her freshman year, Talbert finished 23rd out of 24. Her sophomore year, she came in the 16th spot, and her junior year, she  finished 13th, improving each year. In her freshman and sophomore seasons, she received All-American honors. In Talbert’s overall career, she finished with four National Championships appearances, 10 ASUN titles, 20 All-Conference honors and 13 ASUN Runner of the Week awards. Talbert graduated from Lipscomb with a degree in Elementary Education in May, 2016. Photo courtesy of Lipscomb Athletics...
NCAA offers Kelly Young guidance after historic career 

NCAA offers Kelly Young guidance after historic career 

From a field of more than 460,000 athletes participating at NCAA institutions, Lipscomb’s star softball pitcher Kelly Young was one of only 200 selected for the Career and Sports forum in Indianapolis, Indiana. The forum’s mission is simple: to help athletes find a job. As Young is now a Lipscomb graduate with a historic softball career behind her, she must face the challenges of life after sports. “Just to be one of the few people selected to represent Lipscomb is such an honor,” Young said. “It’s nice to know that I have made an impact on administrators and coaches and people that I really don’t work directly with every day. To be selected by the NCAA was a huge honor and an awesome opportunity that I never knew how much I could benefit from.” The program springs from NCAA realization that once many college athletes are done with the sport they have played their entire lives, they will not know how to deal with no longer having that activity as integral to their lives. The purpose of the Career and Sports forum is to give athletes an opportunity to network and learn about themselves and how they can still give back to their sport even if their eligibility is up. Each day consisted of several different panels, such as the overview of intercollegiate athletics, a graduate assistant panel and breakout sessions. “There were athletes of all ages present,” Young said. “Each athlete there ranged from people who didn’t know what to do after college, or athletes that already had graduate assistant jobs set in place, but it was beneficial to...
2016 spring Commencement Ceremony photo gallery

2016 spring Commencement Ceremony photo gallery

Lipscomb celebrated a record number of graduates, a Fulbright scholar, 29 SALT Scholars and three outstanding professors Saturday afternoon in Allen Arena. Over 500 students graduated making it the largest number of students in the university’s history. Chemistry professor C. Kent Clinger gave the invocation, education professor Carrie R. Abood gave the faculty charge and exercise science professor Ruth Henry recognized 29 SALT scholars from six different academic areas. President Randy Lowry charged the students to remember to express gratitude and appreciation to those who helped them get to their graduation. Photos by Ben...
2016 IDEAL Commencement Ceremony photo gallery

2016 IDEAL Commencement Ceremony photo gallery

The smiles of IDEAL students, friends and family lit up Stowe Hall Friday afternoon when Lipscomb awarded eight students in Lipscomb’s IDEAL program with career exploration study certificates. IDEAL is a two-year certificate program for students with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Students in the program attend academic and skill-building classes, work daily internships and hang out with peer mentors and the student body. Photos by Erin...
Lecrae’s Higher Learning tour photo gallery

Lecrae’s Higher Learning tour photo gallery

Class was back in session as two-time Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist Lecrae dropped by Collins Auditorium Thursday night as part of his 2016 Higher Learning Tour.   Photos by Becca Risley...
Mr. Lipscomb pageant photo gallery

Mr. Lipscomb pageant photo gallery

Freshman Cole Buttrey won the third annual Mr. Lipscomb pageant Monday night in Shamblin theater, hosted by Delta Omega to raise awareness for Best Buddies. The pageant consisted of four categories: formal, cold-weather wear, talent and interview.   Photos by Becca Risley   « ‹ 1 of 3 › »...

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