Lipscomb business students excel on national exam

Lipscomb business students excel on national exam

Last year, Lipscomb College of Business seniors took part in a comprehensive test known as the Peregrine Exam. It was recently announced that years of hard work by both students and faculty had paid off. The Lipscomb College of Business outperformed all schools with similar accreditation, an accomplishment that reflects well on the university and could eventually boost degree values for current and former students. The Peregrine Exam is a comprehensive test used to measure learning outcomes. It covers various topics that have been taught in business courses. “One of the more important things we learn from the exam is the percentage of correctly answered questions in both the overall exam and in the sub areas,” said Assistant Dean of Accreditation and Assessment John Crawford. The College of Business uses the scores from the Peregrine Exam to shape curriculum by analyzing how B.B.A. students performed in areas both inside and outside of their specific major. However, the College of Business won’t be able to tell whether their curriculum changes are effective until new students cycle through the program and take the exam at the conclusion of their senior years. “The goal is always to do better, but it could be one of those situations where you’re trying to do something in an area where students tend to learn about that particular topic earlier on,” said Crawford. So, how do the students feel about the Peregrine exam? “Students don’t typically go away from the test saying that the material was unfamiliar or that they forgot most of a particular subject,” said Crawford. Similar sentiments were expressed by recent Lipscomb graduate...
Freedom Rider Dr. Rip Patton inspires students in MASK chapel for Black History Month

Freedom Rider Dr. Rip Patton inspires students in MASK chapel for Black History Month

In a chapel meant to foster cultural communication, racial reconciliation and acceptance, Freedom Rider Dr. Rip Patton spoke to students about his fight for desegregation through nonviolence. “Nonviolence is a way of violence,” Patton said to the group of students gathered. “It’s a way of fighting — fighting with love.” During his sit-down in Multicultural Awareness Skills and Knowledge (MASK) chapel with Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Norma Burgess, Patton began the conversation before the first question was asked by drawing a contrast between what Lipscomb students see every day on their walls with what he saw as a college student in segregated Nashville. “I’m sure we’ve all heard the prayer, but when I first walked in through those doors, I saw this up here,” Patton said, gesturing to the words of Mark 10:45 embossed into the top of the stained-glass window in Ezell chapel. “‘I did not come to be served, but to serve and give my life as a ransom for many.’ Think about that,” the Freedom Rider said. “Put yourself in that place. That’s what happened here in Nashville in 1960 through 1964. It took us about four years to desegregate everything in Nashville. Everything you could think of was segregated.” Freedom Riders are those who boarded the buses heading to the most notably segregated cities in the South to challenge Jim Crow laws by using peaceful means in 1961. The rides were a tactic established and organized by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) aimed at desegregating public transportation in the South after the Supreme Court ruled segregation in interstate buses...
Former student-led newsletter resurfaces on campus

Former student-led newsletter resurfaces on campus

After eight years of silence, the Lipscomb Underground is back in circulation. The Lipscomb Underground is a newsletter that was founded in 1994 by former Lipscomb students Todd DuPriest and Justin King. According to their first issue, the Underground was meant to be a free and open-forum news source for Lipscomb’s campus, relying almost entirely on student discussion for its content.  In efforts to stay true to the original intent, the new host senior William Sisson wrote in the first issue since 2008, “This is college. We should be able to spread our ideas without fear of administrative retaliation.” One former contributor who knew the original hosts still calls Lipscomb’s campus home. Lipscomb’s Assistant Director of Security Patrick Cameron said the beginning of the Underground was far from an underground paper as it was once sent to the White House and the Space Shuttle.  “When I was an undergraduate, there were a couple of guys that I was good friends with: Justin King and Todd DuPriest, and Justin and Todd were the original founders of the Underground,” Cameron said. “Since I was good friends with both of them, I had the opportunity to contribute and to publish occasionally.” Senior and Lipscomb Underground subscriber Jay Klein is only a recent patron, and he says he sees the Underground’s role on campus as a facilitator and encourager of free-thinking and...
Beaman Library welcomes 323 hymnals to Bailey Hymnal Collection

Beaman Library welcomes 323 hymnals to Bailey Hymnal Collection

It all started with a passion for music. Clarence Paul Brown, father of Lipscomb professor Larry Brown and grandfather to Lipscomb sophomore Emily Butts, donated 323 hymnals to the The Bailey Hymnal Collection in February. The hymns are to be stored in the Beaman Library Special Collection archives. “Paul’s donation is monumental because to have a collection from a member of the Church of Christ and in the Nashville area is something special,” special collections librarian Elizabeth Rivera said. “What makes his gift so significant is that a lot of them are from the 1920s and they are just treasures of what different churches and denominations used for worship.” Brown began leading singing at the age of 16 and just before donating his collection of hymnals to the archives, he celebrated 70 years of song leading. While several of the donated hymnals were his own, a bulk of the collection came from Michael Moore. Moore was also a song leader and spent several years collecting hymnals. “Unfortunately he died of a heart attack,” professor Brown said. “His widow knew Dad was a good friend of his and loved music too, so she gave them to him. “The books were from multiple people. Inside, you can see they were gifts from lots of different people – all from a lifelong love of hymns.” Because of this donation, which included three CD’s and a few newspaper clippings, the archives now have over 2,800 hymnals. “I know letting go of those hymnals was hard for him because that meant acknowledging that that part of his life was over, but I’m proud of...
Lipscomb history professor nears completion of historically revolutionary book

Lipscomb history professor nears completion of historically revolutionary book

After generating an idea almost 40 years ago, Dr. Jerry Gaw of the Lipscomb Department of History, Politics and Philosophy prepares for the completion of a laborious literary project. His coming book focuses on how David Lloyd George’s Church of Christ background influenced his politics while he served as Prime Minister of Great Britain during the First World War. “I first learned that Prime Minister David Lloyd George was a member of the Church of Christ in 1979 when I was in graduate school,” Gaw said. “I did not get to start research in Britain until 1994 because that’s when I received a grant to do so.” Since that initial 1994 grant, Gaw has only been able to travel overseas for research three other times. After years of compiling and writing, he hopes to be able to send his first draft in for publishing no later than March of 2016. From then, Gaw said it should only take a little over a year before the final product is out on the market. “I have published a book about Joseph Lister and antisepsis, which was my dissertation subject.  The final book I wrote came out in 1999 though,” Gaw said. “Everybody ‘ought to have at least one book in each millennium I think.” Gaw’s working title for his unedited 500-page piece is David Lloyd George and the Politics of Religious Convictions. The book will revolve around Lloyd George’s writings and policies that allude to his upbringing in the Church of Christ and his various social and economic convictions that seem to be results of his religious affiliation. “When I first started doing research in 1994,...