For Dad: How glioblastoma bonded, inspired two Lipscomb volleyball players

For Dad: How glioblastoma bonded, inspired two Lipscomb volleyball players

Alyssa Zwolensky was scrolling through Instagram to try to get some insight on her future Lipscomb volleyball teammates. She was, after all, about to make the 700-mile trip to Nashville from her home in Rockledge, Florida, to enroll at Lipscomb a semester early, which understandably caused some nerves. Then she came across the page of Megan Sullivan, who was set to transfer to Lipscomb from Houston for the Spring 2017 semester. Sullivan played sparingly for the Cougars in 2016 and wanted a chance to restart her college volleyball career in a new city. Zwolesnky eventually noticed a picture of Sullivan with her dad, who was sporting a scar on his head. After Zwolesnky did more digging and exchanged a few texts with Sullivan, things took a dark turn. “Also, what type of brain cancer does your Dad have?” Alyssa texted Megan. “I was like, “I don’t know, it’s some long name that starts with a ‘G’,’” said Sullivan, who checked with her stepmother to confirm the scientific name of her father’s disease, which was glioblastoma, an aggressive cancer that affects the brain or spine and currently has no cure. Zwolesnky was stunned. Her father, James, had passed away from the very same type of cancer in April 2016, just five months after his initial diagnosis. “We were just like ‘wow,’” Sullivan said. The connection formed an instant bond between the two girls. Finally, they each had someone who understood the pain glioblastoma can cause a family. “It’s an unreal story,” said Lipscomb volleyball coach Brandon Rosenthal. “For Alyssa to have somebody like Megan, and Megan to have somebody like Alyssa…no...
Apparent water main break causes problems on campus

Apparent water main break causes problems on campus

Lipscomb students awoke to an unpleasant surprise Saturday morning. An apparent water main break on the south side of campus left several buildings without water access. Water was seen gushing from pipes on a grassy hill between Sewell and Johnson Hall, leaving Sewell’s parking lot partially flooded. Sewell, Johnson and High Rise Hall were all without water late into the afternoon. “No sinks, no showers, no drinking fountains and no toilets,” senior High Rise resident Nathienel Hipsley said. “Luckily I filled my water bottle up last night so I had some to brush my teeth and take my pills.” Lipscomb spokesperson Kim Chaudoin sent an email to all Lipscomb students and faculty detailing the University’s plans to fix the problem. Water service was eventually restored to all University buildings other than Sewell by 6:30 p.m. Saturday evening. “The Campus Service Operations team will be shutting down water services to that end of campus from 2-5 p.m. today to make a repair that will restore normal water operations,” Chaudoin said in the statement. During the 2-5 p.m. window, water service to Allen Arena, the Student Activities Center, McQuiddy Gym, Johnson Residence Hall, Sewell Residence Hall, High Rise Residence Hall, Bennett Campus Center, Swang Business Center and the Burton Health Sciences Center was unavailable. Buildings on the north side of campus, like Bison Hall and The Village, were among those unaffected by the water issue. Lipscomb Dining Services has also returned to its normal operating schedule. The incident occurred as many University students and parents gathered on campus for Family Weekend, highlighted by the annual Tau Phi Cowboy Show Saturday night. This...
No silver linings for Caleb Joseph as Orioles finish in MLB cellar

No silver linings for Caleb Joseph as Orioles finish in MLB cellar

BALTIMORE – Caleb Joseph has never been one for moral victories, and a historically-bad MLB season did nothing to change his mind. Joseph’s Baltimore Orioles were inept from the outset and finished the year with a 47-115 record. The former Lipscomb standout refused to sugarcoat the franchise’s worst season since its inception in 1901. “It’s been a disappointment to say the least,” he said. “We lost a historical amount of games. It’s quite a different atmosphere [from what] I’ve been used to in Baltimore.” Joseph drew national media attention in mid-September when he spoke his mind to The Athletic’s Dan Connolly. By that point, Joseph’s frustrations had nearly boiled over. “I’ve never seen sports teams survive seasons like this without people losing jobs, period,” Joseph told Connolly. “Players, you name it. It’s a privilege to be here, but you don’t lose a record number of games and not expect some retribution. Everybody. Every single locker in here should be thinking, ‘You know, I should be fired because I sucked. Period.’” The 32-year-old catcher did not back down from his previous statements, but he emphasized that he’d like to be part of the team’s solution following a fire sale that included trading top players like Jonathan Schoop, Manny Machado, Kevin Gausman, Zach Britton and Brad Brach. “There was a lot that was on my mind that day,” Joseph said of his candid September remarks. “I feel strongly about this organization. This is the only organization I’ve known. I want to fight for it. I had some things to say that were potentially controversial, but I’m a hard worker, and I...
How Lipscomb’s nine professional baseball players fared in 2018

How Lipscomb’s nine professional baseball players fared in 2018

Another baseball season has nearly come and gone. For Lipscomb’s nine former players in the professional ranks, 2018 was a mixed bag. Several players had outstanding seasons, while others struggled to stay healthy and find consistency. Caleb Joseph appeared in a few MLB games with his younger brother, while Michael Gigliotti tore his ACL and missed nearly the entire season. Meanwhile, Chris Nunn found success in the independent American Association after being released by the Houston Astros. Those are just a few of the storylines that can be found in the full breakdown below: MLB (1): Caleb Joseph, C, Baltimore Orioles: 77 GP, 251 AB, 25 R, 54 H, 17 RBI, 3 HR, 10 BB, .215 AVG* After batting .256 in 2017, Joseph’s performance at the plate regressed some this season. He spent one month with Triple-A Norfolk to get more regular playing time, but the Orioles brought Joseph back to Baltimore in June. The Franklin native then got the rare opportunity to pair with his younger brother, Corban, who briefly called up by the Orioles this summer. They are just one of nearly 100 sets of brothers to became MLB teammates. Baltimore (45-110) is set to finish with the worst record in baseball. Joseph has been outspoken about the team’s struggles and told The Athletic’s Dan Connolly that he understands why Camden Yards is mostly empty on game nights. “I don’t blame (the fans) at all,” Joseph said of the Oriole faithful. “I’ve been through really bad seasons in professional sports as a fan in Nashville. It’s not motivating. Of course, I don’t blame them at all (for not...
Lady Bisons upset Kentucky with strong second half

Lady Bisons upset Kentucky with strong second half

Lipscomb women’s soccer coach Kevin O’Brien typically schedules several Power 5 opponents to help the Lady Bisons prepare for ASUN play. However, sometimes his team plays the spoiler role against unsuspecting opponents. Such was the case Sunday night as the Lady Bisons topped Kentucky by a score of 2-1 at the Lipscomb Soccer Complex. “For us, any time we get to play a Power 5, it’s a special thing,” O’Brien said. “We don’t win all of them, that’s for darn sure. But whenever we get a Power 5 win, that’s pretty special.” The win is Lipscomb’s first over an SEC opponent since beating Mississippi State on August 26, 2016. Lipscomb went 0-3-1 against SEC teams in 2017, including a 2-1 loss at Kentucky last September. “We’ve got a squad that doesn’t fear anybody,” O’Brien said. “[Bigger schools] might have more blue-chip recruits or athleticism, but in the end, a lot of it is about heart, determination and a willingness to work for each other.” The Lady Bisons got on the board just eight minutes into the game when defender Hailey Eck looped a pass to Maycie McKay, who sidestepped Kentucky goalkeeper Hannah Leonard and finished an easy chip shot. “We’ve switched [McKay] from being a winger to more out an out-and-out forward, and she’s doing great,” O’Brien said. “She’s composed around the goal and finishes her chances.” Kentucky (4-6) knotted the score at one with a goal from Miranda Jimenez in the 40th minute. The Wildcats thoroughly dominated the first half and outshot Lipscomb 11-2. But the Lady Bisons (5-3-2) kept the Wildcats from scoring again, thanks to six saves from...