Frozen 2 delivers backstory but doesn’t stack up against the first Disney classic

Frozen 2 delivers backstory but doesn’t stack up against the first Disney classic

Disney has re-entered the world of ice, castles, and comedy with its long-awaited sequel, Frozen 2. In the past, Disney has admittingly had trouble with remakes and sequels. However, the animation giant seems to be regaining its quintessential magic with its newest release. The last two Disney sequel releases, Incredibles 2 and Toy Story 4, shattered box office records to become the top two highest-grossing animated features of all time and the Frozen sequel is already right on their heels. Currently, the film is taking the third grossing spot and outpacing these two films in presale tickets alone. Despite a nearly six-year gap since the first Frozen release, Frozen 2 seems to recognize that the fan base itself has grown while leaving room for younger kids to also enjoy the film. Both Elsa and Anna lose their signature braids and dresses in favor of sleek ponytails and pants, seemingly to mark the transition from innocent young girls to courageous adult women. Their quest: to find the origin of Elsa’s ice powers and reunite the kingdom of Arendelle with its mysterious enchanted forest counterpart. Over the course of their adventure, Princess Anna (voiced by Kristen Bell)  worries that her sister’s ice powers aren’t enough to protect her from the world beyond their safe home. Queen Elsa (voiced by Idina Menzel) battles the elements to learn that she’s valued and deserving of a greater purpose than just being queen. Olaf, the living snowman, is given youthful humor that peaks at naivety while Kristoff and Sven, the former iceman/reindeer duo, figure out how to pop the question to an unsuspecting Anna. And...
Students travel to Memphis for a look back in time at the National Civil Rights Museum

Students travel to Memphis for a look back in time at the National Civil Rights Museum

American musician Shawn Amos once said, “Memphis is the place where rock was born and Martin Luther King, Jr., was killed. It’s full of contradictions, abject poverty, and riches that only music can provide.”  Lipscomb’s Office of Intercultural Development and Law, Justice, and Society program invited students to Memphis over fall break to witness this city’s unique dichotomy. Students first visited Beale Street, named by CNN Travel as one of the most iconic streets in America. These three blocks in the heart of downtown Memphis gave students a glimpse into the place where blues, jazz, and rock ‘n’ roll were founded. “As a music lover, I felt like I could feel my roots on Beale Street. It was heavily influenced by the past and that’s where most of today’s music comes from. Memphis is soul and you could feel it when you walked those streets,” senior Noah Kimbrough said. But, the ultimate purpose of the trip was to give students tangible insight into the struggles, sacrifices, and successes of the Civil Rights era and the people who gave the movement life. The National Civil Rights museum stands in conjunction to the Lorraine Motel, the balcony where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot and killed. Each exhibit within shows a different aspect of African American history, from transatlantic slavery of the early 1600s to the beginning of the Obama Administration in 2012. With a recent 200 million dollar update, the museum uses modern technology, live exhibits, artifacts, and film to give students an immersive look at Civil Rights. Lipscomb junior Eden Melles said that “the trip gave her a...
Lipscomb Pharmacy Dept. preps students for flu season with annual Bison Flu Fest

Lipscomb Pharmacy Dept. preps students for flu season with annual Bison Flu Fest

With the chilly fall winds of October, also come the sneezes and sniffles of Flu Season. This annually recurring period usually runs its course between October and May, with an increase of cases ramping up when the weather gets cold. Trying to help reduce flu cases on campus, Lipscomb’s Pharmacy Department is hosting Bison Flu Fest, which offers vaccinations at little to no cost to students. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates there were 37 to 43 million flu cases last year in the United States, with children and pregnant women being at the highest risk. However, Elizabeth Melby, a junior in the nursing program, says this time of year can also be dangerous for college students. On a busy campus like Lipscomb, students may be carriers without knowing it, and the close proximity only increases the risk of contracting the flu. “College students aren’t sleeping as much and have high-stress levels, so their immune systems have to work a little harder to keep up with the stressful environment. If even one student goes to class sick, then everyone else that sat in that chair can potentially spread the virus. Things like the flu spread easily that way.” As a result, the College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences is working to protect the Lipscomb community with the Bison Flu Fest, a solution is more simple than you may think and readily available on campus. During the event which takes place on Wednesday, October 9th from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., certified student pharmacists and physician assistants will be giving free flu shots in Bison Square. Their goal: to...
Lipscomb students “spin” themselves to a healthier community

Lipscomb students “spin” themselves to a healthier community

Before her class began at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Emily Patti spent a few minutes adjusting her seat pedals and fixing her microphone. She greeted students individually as they walked in the door and warmly welcomed new members. Then, she dimmed the lights, got on her bike, and blasted the stereo. This is Spin, the world of indoor cycling, which first found its way to Lipscomb University in 2009. Since then, group fitness has had a sharp increase in participation with Spin being the most attended class on campus. The concept of Spin is simple: a 45-minute fitness session where students ride stationary bikes at various levels of resistance while led by an instructor. This, combined with bass pumping music and a dark room, makes for an immersive yet entertaining workout. In recent years, spin classes have become extremely popular, with celebrities like Beyonce and former President Barack Obama loving the fast-paced and high-intensity workouts that make them break a sweat. But it’s more than just the challenging workout that keeps students coming back week after week. Some students rely on the class environment with an upbeat instructor to keep them involved in this fitness fad.  “I love the fun group vibe here and the music,” said Lipscomb student, Abigail Hardage. “Yes, it’s a challenging workout, but Emily motivates me to be the absolute best. I honestly don’t think I’d be able to do on my own what she pushes me to do each week.” Emily Patti is the instructor for the twice-weekly class, she began teaching after a soccer injury left her unable to exercise with the team. She...
New Exhibit ‘Animators After Dark’ features local legends art work

New Exhibit ‘Animators After Dark’ features local legends art work

A new exhibit in Lipscomb’s Hutchenson gallery was announced this past week to kick off the fall season. The new exhibit titled, “Animators After Dark” features a more dramatic side of the industry experts with works from Tom Bancroft, Tim Hodge, John Pomeroy, and Scott Sava.  These local legends have created some of your favorite films and shows including Veggie Tales, The Lion King, Tom & Jerry, and more. But when the animating ends, these artists go home “after dark” to create their own work. This allows them to express themselves in other mediums without the pressure of deadlines or storyboarding. “This exhibition showcases what Bancroft, Hodge, Pomeroy, and Sava create in their free moments of artistic exploration. With some of the pieces, you will be able to see a clear parallel to the work that these artists create in their “day job”. For example, Bancroft’s pieces still feature his famous Disney characters and Sava’s pieces feature vibrant illustrations of pop culture characters. But, some of the pieces are a stark contrast to the artists’ animation work,” said Mia Jaye Thomas, program coordinator for the Hutcheson Art Gallery. While serving as adjunct professors in the animation department, the four professionals featured in the gallery have helped shape the next generation of students at Lipscomb. Through this gallery, the animators hope to showcase the side projects that they work on when they want to explore their own stories. Ultimately, the illustrations, paintings, and sketches are also a chance to inspire their students to create. “We hope that students and faculty come to see this exhibition (and all of our exhibitions)...